Digital thermometers and Tradition


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Intuit » Sep 6th, '09, 16:49

This will be amusing.

For twenty points on our daily pop quiz, when you do think the common thermometer (that is, the Hg form) came into common use?

Also, there are many, relatively accurate, approximate methods for estimating temperature. The oldest methods have been in use for cooking and food processing for.....probably before the advent of writing. :lol:
Intuit
 
Posts: 981
Joined: Dec 17th, '

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby woozl » Sep 6th, '09, 21:21

random guess kelvin 1800's ?
User avatar
woozl
 
Posts: 774
Joined: Jan 27th, '
Location: Alice's Tea Party

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Seeker » Sep 7th, '09, 02:45

1714, Gabriel Fahrenheit. But that would be the invention - as for when they came into "common use", mid to late 1700's?
User avatar
Seeker
 
Posts: 1732
Joined: May 22nd, '
Location: Northern California

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Tead Off » Sep 7th, '09, 02:51

ummaya wrote:
Rainy-Day wrote:I'm planning to learn to brew tea perfectly


That's exactly what I told myself when I started to drink Japanese greens but since then I realized that perfection is something that goes one step further each time it seems I get one step closer to it.

Gradually and continuously improving my brewing skills seems a more achievable goal than reaching perfection.


This reminds me of a little aphorism that goes like this:

Perfection ceases with the first breath
And, returns with the last.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3488
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby ummaya » Sep 7th, '09, 06:15

Tead Off wrote:Perfection ceases with the first breath
And, returns with the last


I am glad I am imperfect. :mrgreen:
ummaya
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Tel Aviv Israel

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Chip » Sep 7th, '09, 12:04

I can brew sencha w/o the newer tools of the trade including a digital thermometer as I did yesterday while at a family picnic, but generally I simply prefer to use them. I enjoy using such digital and modern devices as a scale, thermometer, and timer (which I set to count up versus count down since I do NOT like the beeping).

These enhance my enjoyment of the whole process and enable a sensing person such as me who lacks intuitive traits to brew superb tea each time, and allows me to quantitativeley alter the brew to taste and mood.

What is important is, they are "right" for me, enhancing versus detracting the tea experience.

But brew as you like, like as you brew! So, find what is right for you and do not suffer from false guilt. They are modern, yes, but I fail to see how this makes them wrong.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22181
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Tead Off » Sep 7th, '09, 12:24

ummaya wrote:
Tead Off wrote:Perfection ceases with the first breath
And, returns with the last


I am glad I am imperfect. :mrgreen:


You have no choice. :lol:
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3488
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby ummaya » Sep 7th, '09, 13:01

Chip wrote:They are modern, yes, but I fail to see how this makes them wrong.


Wrong? Certainly not. They are "right" and useful and I bet that many among the ancients would use them instead of using their intuition.

What is important is, they are "right" for me, enhancing versus detracting the tea experience


Exactly like I find most of the time the "teacup transfer method" right for me.

person such as me who lacks intuitive traits


Are you not underestimating your intuition ?
ummaya
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Tel Aviv Israel

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Rainy-Day » Sep 8th, '09, 00:11

Tead Off wrote:
ummaya wrote:
Rainy-Day wrote:I'm planning to learn to brew tea perfectly


That's exactly what I told myself when I started to drink Japanese greens but since then I realized that perfection is something that goes one step further each time it seems I get one step closer to it.

Gradually and continuously improving my brewing skills seems a more achievable goal than reaching perfection.


This reminds me of a little aphorism that goes like this:

Perfection ceases with the first breath
And, returns with the last.


What I meant is reaching the same results as I do with thermometer and timer, without.
User avatar
Rainy-Day
 
Posts: 179
Joined: May 4th, '0
Location: NJ

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby ummaya » Sep 8th, '09, 02:02

Rainy-Day wrote:What I meant is reaching the same results as I do with thermometer and timer, without.


I am sure it is possible to get the same results but not all the time. If you improve your brewing skills you may maximize the right hits and minimize the misses (and the degree of the misses)

Sometime I check by curiosity to see if reach the temperature I want when I use the "teacup transfer method" ; most of the time it is exact and even when it differs it is a matter of a couple of degrees.

I never tried to brew without using a digital timer. What method of counting the seconds do you use?

What about a digital scale ? I never use one (I don't have one) so I guess that even if use a digital thermometer and timer my brewing method still lacks precision.

EDITED: I guess that to be precise while using modern instruments you should use a thermometer,a timer and a scale. I read more about people using a thermometer and a timer and less about a scale (more about teaspoon and heaping teaspoon). I have no idea if their importance is equal.
ummaya
 
Posts: 93
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Tel Aviv Israel

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Rainy-Day » Sep 8th, '09, 22:23

ummaya wrote:
Rainy-Day wrote:What I meant is reaching the same results as I do with thermometer and timer, without.


I am sure it is possible to get the same results but not all the time. If you improve your brewing skills you may maximize the right hits and minimize the misses (and the degree of the misses)

Sometime I check by curiosity to see if reach the temperature I want when I use the "teacup transfer method" ; most of the time it is exact and even when it differs it is a matter of a couple of degrees.

I never tried to brew without using a digital timer. What method of counting the seconds do you use?

What about a digital scale ? I never use one (I don't have one) so I guess that even if use a digital thermometer and timer my brewing method still lacks precision.

EDITED: I guess that to be precise while using modern instruments you should use a thermometer,a timer and a scale. I read more about people using a thermometer and a timer and less about a scale (more about teaspoon and heaping teaspoon). I have no idea if their importance is equal.


I don't mean getting exact temperature or time, but making tea that tastes as good. A few degrees and a few seconds off are not a problem. I have a scale but I never use it, it's a very small jewelry scale and it's only suitable for teas like sencha or some darjeelings that you can fit in the scale's bowl.

I don't have any method for counting seconds and I think that's not necessary. If you pay attention to the passage of time, you can get close enough to make tea that will taste just as good. It's a skill and like any other skill, it needs time and practice.
User avatar
Rainy-Day
 
Posts: 179
Joined: May 4th, '0
Location: NJ

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby 3rik » Feb 3rd, '11, 02:45

It is beautiful to use a digital thermometer than the traditional. In digital thermometer it has a new feature that you can set a time. But in traditional timer there is no automatic turn off.
3rik
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Feb 3rd, '1

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Oni » Feb 4th, '11, 02:38

I have had gyokuro prepared at a Japanese fireplace, with traditional devices, with no use of modern aids, for aesthetic purposes, the result was very good, but the man did not measure time with a watch, nor did he use a thermometer, he said that the water should be as hot as the forehead of a man who has fever, he put his hand above the houhin and felt it.
At home I use a thermometer, a scale, a watch, I brew each and every session of tea to my certain standards, but this does not let me experiment unwillingly, only when I am determined to it.
With gyokuro I really need to measure, but with chinese teas I do not measure, this glass method really needs no measuring.
User avatar
Oni
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: Nov 28th, '

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby AlexZorach » Feb 4th, '11, 13:32

I use an analog thermometer. But...two comments come to mind:

* The only reason I use a thermometer is to get an exact, objective reading so that I can communicate with others, online, about what brewing temperature I use. In the practical sense I never actually use the thermometer when brewing tea, I just look at the bubbles in the bottom of the pot I typically use to heat water for tea. You don't need a thermometer for brewing tea, it's only really needed for communicating brewing temperature with others.

* There are many ways to observe temperature in the physical world. There are the bubbles forming in the pot...but even, if you want to go outdoors, there is a range of temperatures (maybe about 10-30 degrees) which is pretty relevant in winter time, within which you can estimate the temperature to within 1-2 degree accuracy by looking at the degree to which rhododendron leaves curl. My mother taught me this. Other broadleaf evergreens curl similarly.

I'm sure there are other ways of assessing temperature besides looking at bubbles!
User avatar
AlexZorach
 
Posts: 285
Joined: Sep 23rd, '

Re: Digital thermometers and Tradition

Postby Shambles » Feb 5th, '11, 13:59

ummaya wrote:What about a digital scale ? I never use one (I don't have one) so I guess that even if use a digital thermometer and timer my brewing method still lacks precision.

EDITED: I guess that to be precise while using modern instruments you should use a thermometer,a timer and a scale. I read more about people using a thermometer and a timer and less about a scale (more about teaspoon and heaping teaspoon). I have no idea if their importance is equal.


I have an analogue thermometer, which I find useful when I'm new to a particular tea, to establish the basic parameters - how does it taste if I. . .? - but this tends to stay in the cupboard most of the time. I couldn't live with a digital readout, or a scale for that matter. Any timing is done on a handwind wristwatch which is older than me, but for longer timings I switch to an egg timer.

Perhaps it's laziness, but. . . I don't want to drink the same cup of tea every time. (I always brew it stronger on a cold day, for instance.) Repetition is death to me.
User avatar
Shambles
 
Posts: 15
Joined: Sep 21st, '
Location: Vancouver, BC

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation