High snobbery


Learn about tea-related establishments open across the world.

Re: High snobbery

Postby JillDragon » Sep 13th, '09, 03:46

Sheesh why don't people get a grip?! That's the downside of internet anonymity - you can be as rude, *BOO*, and childish as you want and chances are no one will call you on it so you'll get away with it, whereas if the person said something similar in the real world there would be consequences.

Me? I'd be glad to have any tea room in my town in British-Columbia - we've still got a bit of a hicktown mentality despite having grown beyond that population-wise, so tea hasn't really taken off (yet). There are lots of nice tea rooms in Vancouver that I've heard of, but that's still a 4 hours drive away, so not something I can do on a regular basis. :D
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Re: High snobbery

Postby tenuki » Sep 13th, '09, 05:17

I had some friends that opened a coffee shop in a well known midwestern town. They did things a bit differently, like randomly taking days off and just putting up a sign saying 'gone fishing'. But they always did a very brisque business and had no problems making ends meet. One day I noticed they had taken tea off the menu. I asked them why, I knew that about half their morning crowd were tea drinkers. They simply said 'We decided we didn't like tea drinkers very much.'

:lol:
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Re: High snobbery

Postby Riene » Sep 13th, '09, 10:03

As far as I know, there's only one tearoom in my area. I've been there a couple times and it's a bit too floofy for me--but it's exactly what they advertise themselves to be! It's all pink and ruffles, floral china and fancy sweets. They host parties for the Red Hat ladies and little girls who want a fantasy birthday tea.

My point is--this is what they advertise themselves to be. They do a good business and the guests seem to be enjoying themselves. If you're expecting a Zen Garden experience or formal British hotel tea, this isn't it. Sadly, I note they've been slammed for not being what someone else wanted them to be. :?
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Re: High snobbery

Postby Riene » Sep 13th, '09, 10:23


Question--are the tea reviews removed after a while? I just went to check on the three places I've reviewed (all during summer 2008, all positive) and none of my reviews are still there. One of the sites had no reviews at all left, and the others had only a couple whereas they'd had dozens before. *puzzled*
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Re: High snobbery

Postby Chip » Sep 13th, '09, 13:25

Interesting, were the reviews on the forum, or in the actual TeaMap. TeaMap is hosted by Adagio.

If it is on the forum and posts are missing, I would like to know about it as Moderator.

Thanks.
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Re: High snobbery

Postby Riene » Sep 13th, '09, 18:41


The posts were all on the TeaMap, and my guess is that reviews greater than a year old have been removed, judging from the dates on the remaining posts.

It's nbd, it just surprised me a bit.
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Re: High snobbery

Postby Chip » Sep 13th, '09, 20:18

Well, TBH I am relieved that it was not another TC glitch :idea: :arrow:
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Re: High snobbery

Postby AlexZorach » Oct 24th, '09, 16:14

I agree with the general sentiment here! I think there is room in the world for many different types of tea rooms.

I really like chamekke's comment about judging a tea room by how well it does what it aims or intends to do, rather than by your personal notion of what it should do, although I think there's still some room for the latter in all reviews!

I personally prefer tea places that have a "Bohemian" feel. One of my main "beefs" with Victorian-style tea rooms is that they typically are only open during lunch-time hours, and that they're less versatile--you need to have things well blocked out, not suitable for a more casual meeting. I enjoy tea at all times of day...and when a place doesn't open till 10 and closes at 3 or 4, it's cut out the most likely times I would visit it. There's a tea room here in Newark, DE that was open till about 7PM when it first opened, and I went there several times. It cut its hours back to 4PM and I haven't been back since, because I'd typically want to meet people there for tea around "tea time"--4 or 5-ish.

At the same time, one thing I really like about the Victorian-style tea rooms is that they force you to slow down your pace of life...you step into them and it's like you've stepped out of our fast-paced society! That can be really refreshing. Some of the more casual in-and-out coffee shops that sell good tea can still remain unpleasantly fast-paced!
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