Earl Gray


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Earl Gray

Postby Teaffany » Nov 26th, '06, 23:39

Earl Gray is a black tea, isn't it? I am another potentially mad tea-smoking amateur, and I was wondering if anyone had tried Earl Gray and had some information about it? Someone today told me it may have hallucinogenic effects. I have only tried twice and have not noticed anything, which is good, right?
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Postby karia » Nov 27th, '06, 10:01

i LOVE earl grey i have 7-10 kinds.

anyway,

Earl Grey tea
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Earl Grey tea is any tea blend with a distinctive flavour and aroma derived from the addition of oil extracted from the rind of the bergamot orange, a fragrant citrus fruit. Traditionally the term "earl grey" was applied only to black tea; however, today the term is also applied to both green and white teas that contain oil of bergamot.

The blend is named after the 2nd Earl Grey, British Prime Minister in the 1830s, who reputedly received a gift, probably a diplomatic perquisite, of tea flavoured with bergamot oil. The legend usually involves a grateful Chinese mandarin whose son was rescued from drowning by one of Lord Grey's men, although this blend of tea was first made from fermented black Indian and "Ceylonese" (Sri Lankan) teas. Green tea is much more popular in China than black. Thus, it seems somewhat unlikely that they would have had a recipe for what we now call Earl Grey to bestow on visitors, though over the years many other varieties of tea have been used. Also, Lord Grey never set foot in China. In another version though, it's the son of an Indian raja being rescued from a tiger by one of Grey's servants.

The tea proved so popular in the Prime Minister's drawing room that his tea merchants, Twinings in the Strand, were given a sample and asked to come up with a close match. Twinings sold the first "Earl Grey's tea" in the British market. Twinings Earl Grey blend includes China tea, Indian Darjeeling, Ceylon, and a hint of Lapsang souchong, a strong, "smoky" black tea. Although it is often served black (without milk), many of the upper classes (contrary to belief) drink it with a little milk (which gives the tea a murky grey colour, similar to that of dull washing up water).

Jacksons of Piccadilly claim that it was they who originated Earl Grey's Tea, Lord Grey having given the recipe to Robert Jackson & Co. partner George Charlton in 1830; according to Jacksons the original recipe has been in constant production and has never left their hands. Theirs has been based on China tea since the beginning. This rivalry between the two tea brands continues despite both being owned by the same parent company today.


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my personal favorites are:
Double earl grey from stash (bag)
earl grey decaf from adagio (loose)
earl grey from rishi (loose)

ironically, i cant stand any of twinings teas. :lol:
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Re: Earl Gray

Postby Chip » Nov 27th, '06, 12:06

Teaffany wrote:Earl Gray is a black tea, isn't it? I am another potentially mad tea-smoking amateur, and I was wondering if anyone had tried Earl Gray and had some information about it? Someone today told me it may have hallucinogenic effects. I have only tried twice and have not noticed anything, which is good, right?



Oh no, not another tea smoking thread...or am I missing something here.

Thanx for the info on Earl Grey, Karia.
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Postby deadfingers » Nov 29th, '06, 01:02

karia wrote:
Although it is often served black (without milk), many of the upper classes (contrary to belief) drink it with a little milk (which gives the tea a murky grey colour, similar to that of dull washing up water).


Wow I think just reading that makes me want to not even try Earl Gray. Just the thought of drinking dish water makes me gag some. :oops: :shock:
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Postby kimber45acp » Jan 31st, '07, 02:30

Earl Grey is a very good tea which is mostly black, but as stated it could mean any tea flavored with bergamot. The bergamot adds a nice taste to the tea and makes it fragrant. Its a nice citrus flavor. I personally like it with milk and sugar.
I don't recommend you smoke it though. If your looking for hallucinogenic effects their are other things out there that will get the job done.
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everyone

Postby Teaffany » Jan 31st, '07, 08:23

Thank you for getting back to me about Earl Gray! The e-mail telling me about it got lost in my inbox until now...
I am currently trying to cut down smoking as my lungs are killing me... Better to drink tea for now but I will look into the ones that were suggested to me.. :wink:
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Postby Mike in KY » Mar 25th, '07, 17:25

China blacks don't completely suit my palate and tend to bother my stomache or make me slightly queezy. On the other hand I drink pot after pot of Assams and Ceylons ( except for Vithanakande and similar more China-like Ceylons.)

That it's mostly China tea explains why I have the same problem drinking Earl Grey. One cup doesn't bother me, unless it's particularly heavy on the bergamot. I find that Twinnings Lady Grey is more understated and overall more likeable than most Greys I've tried, with only slighly more strength than ordinary Lipton's, if you don't mind drinking something called Lady Grey. They should have called it Light Grey. :lol:
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