Gyokuro


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Gyokuro

Postby Betty Klang » Dec 12th, '06, 18:54

greetings!

I know Gyokuro it's a "Japanese" Tea but I heard some is grown in China... So I was curious where the Adagio Gyokuro comes from?

thanks!
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Postby Chip » Dec 12th, '06, 21:13

I have heard of Chinese sencha, but never Chinese Gyokuro...so I would presume with a 99.99999% probablity that it is Japanese unless it states so otherwise.

In fact I just checked the description which mentions Japan several times.
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Postby Betty Klang » Dec 13th, '06, 15:23

yeah...but i've been on sites that say "This is a Japanese tea...and then mentions its grown in China" ;)

so was just curious... because it didn't specifically say where it was grown. Just that it's a Japanese tea. It goes back to "depends what your definition of "is" is " LOL ;)
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Postby Chip » Dec 13th, '06, 16:47

...when in doubt, ask the vendor...they have contact info on their site. I am sure they will answer your question for you.
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Postby MarshalN » Dec 15th, '06, 03:44

Gyokuro should be from Japan.

I have seen teas from China being called "Yulu", which is the Chinese pronunciation for Gyokuro (same characters), however, Gyokuro the steamed green tea should be from Japan only.

Other tea can, of course, made in the Gyokuro style, but that doesn't quite make it Gyokuro.
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