Paying teaware tuition


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby brian » Feb 15th, '10, 09:22

subdude, is that kyusu from yuuki-cha? I've been looking at them and that one caught my eye, I really like the look. Do the rings around it have ridges, or are they just painted? It looks from the photos like it has a really nice texture.
User avatar
brian
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Feb 5th, '1
Location: Colorado

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby subdude1 » Feb 15th, '10, 15:01

brian wrote:subdude, is that kyusu from yuuki-cha? I've been looking at them and that one caught my eye, I really like the look. Do the rings around it have ridges, or are they just painted? It looks from the photos like it has a really nice texture.


Yes, Brian, it is from Yuuki-cha. The rings are indeed raised and the pot has a really nice texture. Sasame filter. Excellent balance when pouring.
Btw, I love your avatar. I'm a Monty Python fan from way back.
User avatar
subdude1
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Oct 20th, '

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby Chip » Feb 15th, '10, 15:13

I believe the rings are formed by the addition of a thin layer called "slip" to the surface, not "paint." Slip is added to create effect, texture, color.

Some artisan purists would not add slip, nor paint to their works.

It is also often added to the surface of handles and spouts where slip adds grip and durability, looks like this one has it there as well.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby subdude1 » Feb 15th, '10, 15:56

Well, all this talk about my kyusu made me dig it out and give a try with some slightly old Fukujyu sencha. Actually came out pretty tasty :D

Chip, it appears that the ridges are formed by "engraving". In other words, the light colored clay (slip or possibly a glaze) is added and then scraped away, revealing the darker color underneath (the same color clay as used for the spout and handle).
User avatar
subdude1
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Oct 20th, '

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby Chip » Feb 15th, '10, 16:31

subdude1 wrote:Well, all this talk about my kyusu made me dig it out and give a try with some slightly old Fukujyu sencha. Actually came out pretty tasty :D

Chip, it appears that the ridges are formed by "engraving". In other words, the light colored clay (slip or possibly a glaze) is added and then scraped away, revealing the darker color underneath (the same color clay as used for the spout and handle).

Glad to hear the Fukujyu Japanese green (?) came out tasty for you in your Kyusu ... I can't seem to remember this selection however? Any info?

I have looked at some slipped Kyusu-s here. It seems like a "stencil" type process. Tape is applied (in the case here, Momiji leaves," the slip was then applied, then the leaves were removed leaving the contrast of smoother under layer and rougher raised layer. This created a multi dimensional layer or depth ... and color contrast. Here the slip is green.
Image

Perhaps this is how they also created the striping? But I only pretend to know what I am talking about. :mrgreen: Hopefully some potters will jump in. The only explanation I ever heard was in broken Japenglish.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby Chip » Feb 15th, '10, 16:39

This Kyusu BTW could be a TeawareTuition entry. While it is really "stylin'" it lacks function of Kyusu costing a fraction of this artisan creation. It is extremely well made, except in the area of function. The lid opening is way too small making pouring leaves in difficult and cleaning a task, the water does not drain completely when pouring (a huge issue for Japanese teas). And the handle is very small, in fact I had to get some help in multiple grips for Kyusu from Toru so I was comfortable using it. This one requires a sort of knuckle ball grip. :roll:

It looks grrrrreat on the shelf, but it has been a year since last use. I should check out the sasame screen to see if I can resolve the draining issue.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby gingkoseto » Feb 15th, '10, 17:03

My goofy shoe paste yixing :mrgreen:
Image

Image

This is my tuition shoe paste Yixing teapot. Luckily so far this happened only twice, so it's not that painful to look back. I am generally a conservative buyer, but I swear this one looked really nice in photo of the selling page. The seller was not a tea/teapot specialized one (an expensive seller though...) so I thought there wasn't much common ground to argue with them about the clay materials. So I just kept it as a decor piece on shelf. Most of my friends are not frequent tea drinkers, so they don't realize this is an evidence that I goofed :D
User avatar
gingkoseto
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24th, '
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby subdude1 » Feb 15th, '10, 17:45

Chip wrote:Glad to hear the Fukujyu Japanese green (?) came out tasty for you in your Kyusu ... I can't seem to remember this selection however? Any info? .


Sorry Chip. Not much info on this tea. Bought it from a local vendor last summer. Handwriting on package just says "Japan Fukujyu". My guess is a light steamed sencha, but I'm rather green when it comes to Jap. teas :wink:

Chip wrote:... It seems like a "stencil" type process...
Perhaps this is how they also created the striping? But I only pretend to know what I am talking about. :mrgreen: Hopefully some potters will jump in. The only explanation I ever heard was in broken Japenglish.


It looks to me more like the light color "slip" was put over the entire body of the pot and then the lines were formed by scraping away the slip with a round pointed tool (ie. chisel or similar) because the darker lines (grooves actually) are concave. Kinda like running a spoon perpendicular to a mound of ice cream (weird analogy, but all I could think of). :?
User avatar
subdude1
 
Posts: 61
Joined: Oct 20th, '

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby Chip » Feb 15th, '10, 17:48

Ohhh, interesting subdude. Thanks for the info.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby iannon » Feb 15th, '10, 22:46

Chip wrote:Ohhh, interesting subdude. Thanks for the info.

i agree with subdude.. I have this kyusu as well.. got it after the tokoname smash of '09. it is actually my only kyusu now and I use it constantly for all my Japanese green brewing
User avatar
iannon
 
Posts: 1631
Joined: Dec 30th, '
Location: The foot of the great Smoky Mountains

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby brian » Feb 16th, '10, 10:10

Thanks iannon, Chip, and subdude for the kyusu info/discussion. I'll keep that one in mind when the time comes for me to "move up" from my glazed starter kyusu. I really like the look and glad to hear that it's performing well for some of you.
User avatar
brian
 
Posts: 104
Joined: Feb 5th, '1
Location: Colorado

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby JBaymore » Feb 18th, '10, 21:40

Chip was correct in how that leaf pattern kyusu was decorated. Using real green leaves fo the resist. The deeper lines are the actual veins in the leaves.

Common technique.

best,

..............john
User avatar
JBaymore
 
Posts: 1671
Joined: Sep 15th, '
Location: Wilton, New Hampshire USA

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby InsanityPrelude » Feb 23rd, '10, 23:48

I have a little infuser basket that fits the opening on my teapot perfectly- but the lid doesn't fit on top of it, because of the little hook that's meant to keep the lid from falling off when you pour. It's too small for any of my mugs, though.
InsanityPrelude
 
Posts: 10
Joined: Feb 23rd, '

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby entropyembrace » Feb 25th, '10, 04:03

No real mistakes lingering around...the closest thing is a yixing pot which I can´t use anymore since I smashed the lid by dropping a bowl on it...actually I´m surprised the whole pot didn´t get destroyed...I feel bad though it was a Christmas gift from my brother :( I still keep the pot without the lid because it´s pretty.

All the other old teaware I don´t use anymore has gone to the garbage dump...uhm...I´m clumsy :oops:

What I have learned is that short pots and cups with wide bases tend to live longer... :lol:
User avatar
entropyembrace
 
Posts: 1906
Joined: Mar 3rd, '0

Re: Paying teaware tuition

Postby debunix » Feb 25th, '10, 04:20

entropyembrace wrote:short pots and cups with wide bases tend to live longer... :lol:


It's frustrating that a lot of the inexpensive teaware in my local shops has very narrow bases, even if the bowl/cup itself is wide and short, it balances on a narrow foot. Quite annoying for those of us who are not naturally graceful.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 5020
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Previous

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation