Identifying "White Yunnan"


White and yellow teas are among the most subtle.

Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby debunix » May 23rd, '10, 09:55

Both white and green teas will oxidize after infusion, from exposure to air (and perhaps dissolved gasses in the water, too?). I've done the experiment....

Image

Three different teas infused and left to sit for 3 hours. It was very difficult technically to get the before and after pictures to match,but I hope it's clear that the green tea oxidized to a pale but distinctly brownish color.
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » May 24th, '10, 06:16

debunix wrote:Both white and green teas will oxidize after infusion, from exposure to air (and perhaps dissolved gasses in the water, too?).


Ah, so it's hard to tell from a picture alone whether a tea is green or white? Here is a picture anyway. I just placed the leaves in cold water and let them stand over night (probably about 15 hours by now). It's almost the colour of a lighter black tea. Come to think of it, I probably should have done the same thing with green tea for comparison. Oh well. :P

tea.jpg
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » May 28th, '10, 04:33

After a few days of infusion, the "White Yunnan" was darker than a black tea. I've tried the same with a green tea now, and it's still quite light. I guess that rules out the green Mao Feng suggested earlier?
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby debunix » May 28th, '10, 04:57

Both green and white teas will oxidize to brown if left long enough after brewing, so this doesn't differentiate between them.

I've noticed a significant overlap in flavor and appearance between some of my green and white teas. Without an expert to sniff it and brew it and drink it, I don't know how you'd tell the difference.
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby gingkoseto » May 28th, '10, 10:56

I am ready for some experiment too :lol:

Theoretically oxidation of white tea is catalyzed by its own enzyme and green tea oxidation is non-biological oxidation, so the former should be faster than the latter. But it depends on how active enzyme the white tea has. Let's compare our results later :D
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby debunix » May 28th, '10, 12:58

gingko wrote:I am ready for some experiment too :lol:

Theoretically oxidation of white tea is catalyzed by its own enzyme and green tea oxidation is non-biological oxidation, so the former should be faster than the latter. But it depends on how active enzyme the white tea has. Let's compare our results later :D


Ideally we would sit over a long relaxed afternoon of gong fu cha, and just look, sniff and sip the green and white tea samples as they sit out and oxidize. Sounds like a good tea day!
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » Jun 4th, '10, 16:25

It seems this tea is green after all. I got the following information from the supplier. Does the description match the Mao Feng suggested earlier?

China green Yunnan leaf tea

This Chinese green leaf tea has a large dark green coloured leaf with a very high amount of silvery tips. It is processed from the Yunnan large-leaf tea plant.

During a year there are three production periods for this tea: Spring production from the end of February to May, summer production from the end of May to August and finally the autumn production from August to Novermber. It goes without saying that each production season brings out its own quality with its own characteristics. The tea leaves which are tightly rolled give a bright yellowish-green beverage with a mellow taste and a lingering, fragrant aroma.

The main production areas for this tea can be found in regions of about 1300–2000 meters above sea level in natural environment. There the tea plants grow at an average temperature between 12°C and 23°C.
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » Aug 7th, '10, 19:50

I ordered several "green/white" teas from Yunnan Sourcing in order to learn more about teas from the area and compare: Two different Mao Fengs, two different Bi Luo Chuns, and one Silver Strand. While they each have different characteristics, they are all more grassy and milder in flavour than the "White Yunnan" I'm hoping to identify. The "White Yunnan" is very fruity and sweet, almost like a mild first flush Darjeeling (but it does grow astringent and bitter if brewed too long). Does this added information make it easier to guess what it is, or is it still a bit hopeless? :)
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby entropyembrace » Aug 9th, '10, 15:52

absence wrote: The "White Yunnan" is very fruity and sweet, almost like a mild first flush Darjeeling (but it does grow astringent and bitter if brewed too long). Does this added information make it easier to guess what it is, or is it still a bit hopeless? :)


I´ve noticed that Darjeeling-like fruity-sweet character in other white teas which have darkened a bit through what I assume is enzyme action.
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » Aug 10th, '10, 14:19

entropyembrace wrote:I´ve noticed that Darjeeling-like fruity-sweet character in other white teas which have darkened a bit through what I assume is enzyme action.


Interesting. Is that something that happens over time, or does it have to do with the production method?
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby entropyembrace » Aug 10th, '10, 16:56

absence wrote:
entropyembrace wrote:I´ve noticed that Darjeeling-like fruity-sweet character in other white teas which have darkened a bit through what I assume is enzyme action.


Interesting. Is that something that happens over time, or does it have to do with the production method?


it seems be from some point in the production...there´s some white teas which are consistantly rather dark.
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Re: Identifying "White Yunnan"

Postby absence » Aug 11th, '10, 06:05

entropyembrace wrote:it seems be from some point in the production...there´s some white teas which are consistantly rather dark.


"White Yunnan" is rather dark, but so is Silver Strand from Yunnan Sourcing, which is astringent and more grassy rather than fruity and sweet. I guess it goes both ways with the darkness. :)
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