New Technique White Tea


White and yellow teas are among the most subtle.

Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby teaisme » Oct 18th, '10, 16:51

This is not the first time i've heard of white tea being aged.

Don't really think this is a 'gimmick', just something new in market for a specific taste
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby Sirwill » Oct 18th, '10, 19:07

churng wrote:This is not the first time i've heard of white tea being aged.


I have seen cakes labeled as "White Beengcha," or something to that extent.
But I have not seen any loose.
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby teaisme » Oct 19th, '10, 14:29

viewtopic.php?f=5&t=10409

Dragon tea house also has some 2006 shou mei and a 2005 baimudan.
I've seen aged whites in other places too but can't recall off top of head

Don't ever remember seeing an aged silver needle though.
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby debunix » Oct 19th, '10, 14:35

I 'aged' a silver needle stored in a tin can for about 2 years, and at the end of that time, got a silver needle from another source that was fresh, and quite a stunning difference. Definitely did not benefit from aging, at least not under my conditions.

On the other hand, I've been loving my 2007 'White bud' sheng puerh from Norbu that I mention here a lot, and at first, the leaves did have a bit of a silver needle look to them--thin, downy haired, and pale.
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby teaisme » Oct 19th, '10, 18:14

yeah it seems leaf ages better then bud
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby Nenugal » Oct 28th, '10, 09:06

The Premium Organic New Technique White Tea arrived today! My first impression is that it looks similar to a high quality Bai Mu Dan, and actually it tastes very similar to Bai Mu Dan too. Quite good!
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby Sirwill » Oct 28th, '10, 20:09

Glad you enjoy it! Is there any pronounced difference in taste? Or are any of the flavors more prominent?
Sounds decent!
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby Nenugal » Oct 29th, '10, 02:21

Sirwill wrote:Glad you enjoy it! Is there any pronounced difference in taste? Or are any of the flavors more prominent?
Sounds decent!

I Wish I could explain more clearly but my experience with white tea (and tea in general!) is limited and the only white teas I've had are a very nice Silver Needle from teaspring and a cheap low quality Bai Mu Dan from a local shop. My first impression is that the taste of the New Technique is what I would expect from a good Bai Mu Dan after tasting my relatively poor BMD and imagining how BMD could taste if I spent more money to get a better one. The leaves are less broken and the buds are more hairy. The smell and taste is stronger and fresher as if it is more recently picked than my old BMD.
After tasting it again, it still makes me think of a more powerful version of BMD, but now I also notice a hint of some notes (fruity?) that I remember from my Keemun Mao Feng from teaspring (a black tea!). Intriguing! I'm glad I bought it and looking forward to get to know it better.
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Re: New Technique White Tea

Postby legend » Nov 3rd, '10, 06:22

TIM wrote:Image
Had sometime to break-up the cake and store half of it in my new onggi. Taste a bit too commercial... a convention, plantation tea :roll:


This is a duplicate from my other post...
Just a note the tea cake is not an actual White tea (白茶 bai cha) like Bai mu dan, or Yin zun bai hao. It is a kind of large variety white leaf made in a similar process to Sheng Pu er, but as with white tea the leaves are left to ferment just a bit. A true white tea would break down from the heat it takes to form in to a cake, thus you will never see a white tea this way. Domestically here in China it is called "New Process Tea 新工艺" and is marketed as white tea or as white Puer or Moonlight Puer (白月光 Bai yue guang.) Actually the technical and correct name would be New process tea because that is what it is. Traditionally there arent any white, green, or yellow teas that would be treated in this way. If they are authentic valued teas there would be very little remaining by the next years Spring harvest anyway. I am not saying that experimentation in ageing/storage is negative, just that traditionaly it never was done becasue the nutrition of the green/ white tea would fade therefore its value would be lost as well. In the case of teas made for ageing (Black tea, Pu er, certain Wu Longs) the nutrition of a good tea would be increased from secondary fermentaion thus the value would increase accordingly.
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