I need an answer please


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I need an answer please

Postby TeaNotCoffee » Aug 27th, '07, 15:13

Well I have been drinking tea for a long time now and i love it but i see a lot of people putting milk in there tea. For the past couple years since i started drinking tea i never used milk because i heard it takes the health benefits away. Is this true or not because i wouldnt want to waiste i good cup of health beneficial tea.
Someone get back to me on that! :)
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Re: I need an answer please

Postby Mocha Wheels » Aug 27th, '07, 15:22

TeaNotCoffee wrote:Well I have been drinking tea for a long time now and i love it but i see a lot of people putting milk in there tea. For the past couple years since i started drinking tea i never used milk because i heard it takes the health benefits away. Is this true or not because i wouldnt want to waiste i good cup of health beneficial tea.
Someone get back to me on that! :)


i don't know if that's true or not but i think adding anything spoils the natural flavor of the tea... it's in my novice opinon that it is better to find a tea you like w/o adding things to it.
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Re: I need an answer please

Postby TeaNotCoffee » Aug 27th, '07, 17:27

Mocha Wheels wrote:
TeaNotCoffee wrote:Well I have been drinking tea for a long time now and i love it but i see a lot of people putting milk in there tea. For the past couple years since i started drinking tea i never used milk because i heard it takes the health benefits away. Is this true or not because i wouldnt want to waiste i good cup of health beneficial tea.
Someone get back to me on that! :)


i don't know if that's true or not but i think adding anything spoils the natural flavor of the tea... it's in my novice opinon that it is better to find a tea you like w/o adding things to it.



Well i enjoy green tea very much i was just wondering if it tasted good with milk and if the milk took away its health benefits..
but thank you for your input.
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Postby Aqueoustransmeg... » Aug 27th, '07, 22:49

adding milk is not going to undo the health benefits of tea. it's going to add calories and fat but it's not going to make the tea leaves stop putting out the good stuff :P
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Postby Mary R » Aug 27th, '07, 22:59

Well, substances in the milk can bind to many of the different polyphenols in tea...which would prevent you from getting their benefit...but I'm not getting more technical than that. It's far too late to make my brain hurt.
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Postby TeaNotCoffee » Aug 28th, '07, 04:47

Thank You, I'm liking the feedback.
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Postby Wesli » Aug 28th, '07, 22:25

The only way it would "take away" health benefits is by adding calories to the drink, therefore taking away the weight-loss aspect and adding sugar to the drink, which may hurt your teeth.
In my honest opinion, milk serves no purpose but to deaden the intricacies in the flavor of the tea. If you can learn to appreciate tea for what it truly is, then by all means do so.
"One would not want to experience life through the veil of a drug, so why experience tea through the veil of cream or sugar?" -Wes Crosswhite

:arrow: Rage
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Postby Mocha Wheels » Aug 28th, '07, 22:32

i LOVE that quote! if you must alter the flavor of tea sweetening it... i'd suggest using honey since it has nutritional value- or splenda, at least that is calorie free
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Postby Mary R » Aug 28th, '07, 22:48

and both honey and splenda have unique tastes associated with them that can interfere with the taste of whatever tea you're trying.

If you're going to indulge a tea 'vice' by sweetening, go the full monty and add plain white sugar. It's practically pure sucrose and is just simply sweet.
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Postby Space Samurai » Aug 29th, '07, 00:47

I always just figured that in the begining, whatever tea that was imported to Europe was probably crap. Adding milk and sugar the only wat to make it palatable. Hell, even now a lot of higher quality Indian teas taste kind of bland.
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Postby skywarrior » Aug 29th, '07, 02:02

spacesamurai wrote:I always just figured that in the begining, whatever tea that was imported to Europe was probably crap. Adding milk and sugar the only wat to make it palatable. Hell, even now a lot of higher quality Indian teas taste kind of bland.


I read somewhere that the milk thing got started when people thought that hot tea would be too hot for their good china, so they used milk in an effort to cool down the tea. No idea about the sugar, except maybe people have a sweet tooth.
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Postby Mary R » Aug 29th, '07, 10:36

I'm not entirely sure about the sugar either...but those Brits do have themselves a sweet tooth. Their candy options put ours to shame. I remember reading that the milk was sort of an economical necessity for the lower classes. Milk was cheap and tea expensive, so milk helped to stretch the tea out longer. I think I remember reading that it was a noted mark of wealth when you could afford to drink and serve milkless tea.
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Postby Daughteroftheki... » Aug 29th, '07, 23:00

To quote from an old thread: "I drink what I like 'cause I like it."
While I really like most teas on their own or with just a bit of sweetening (stevia), I add a bit of milk depending on my mood. When the tea seems a little strong or I just want a smoother taste, a little milk in chai or chestnut or chocolate tea is very nice. I used to add a spoonful to Darjeeling, but when I found the kind I really like, I liked the tea better straight.
And even though I'm pretty much a tea-totaller, an occasional splash of Bailey's Irish Cream can be quite lovely in cup of black tea in the evening.
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Postby Mary R » Aug 29th, '07, 23:20

Mmmm....Bailey's.... 'Irished' coffee got me through many an early morning class. And got me more participation points. :)
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Postby Mocha Wheels » Aug 30th, '07, 09:04

daughteroftheKing wrote:To quote from an old thread: "I drink what I like 'cause I like it."
While I really like most teas on their own or with just a bit of sweetening (stevia), I add a bit of milk depending on my mood. When the tea seems a little strong or I just want a smoother taste, a little milk in chai or chestnut or chocolate tea is very nice. I used to add a spoonful to Darjeeling, but when I found the kind I really like, I liked the tea better straight.
And even though I'm pretty much a tea-totaller, an occasional splash of Bailey's Irish Cream can be quite lovely in cup of black tea in the evening.


Bailey's! lol the only way to improve a cup of tea in my book :wink: yeah, actually... now i think about it, it's just like a person who likes coffee drinking a frappuccino- i love coffee and frapuccinos! :D
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