Which of these oolongs can be paired?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Which of these oolongs can be paired?

Postby fire_snake » May 1st, '11, 15:52

I'm playing around with dedicating Zhuni pots to particular oolongs.

I'd appreciate it if I received some education about what pairings are acceptable (even encouraged) and what pairings are to be avoided. Let's assume I have several quality Zhuni pots and can get more if required.

Please note, one of the pots has had a lot of Dong Ding brewed in it (from Hojo, not the deep-fired variety.)

Do we categorize and pair based on roasting (high, medium, low), or oxidation (high, medium, low), or both?


---------------------------------------------------------------
Oolongs that need to be paired with pots:

Gao Shan Luanze (origin: Li Shan - 2200 m, Taiwain)
from Teamasters

Sumatra Highland Chin Chin (high elevation - I think, light Indonesian)
already has a pot dedicated to it
described here: http://tea-journey.blogspot.com/2010/10 ... aopia.html

Gao Shan Hung Shui (origin: Shan Lin Shi, Taiwan)
(as seen here: http://teamasters.blogspot.com/2009/05/ ... olong.html)

Wild Concubine (origin: Feng Huang, Taiwan)
as seen here: http://teamasters.blogspot.com/2011/01/ ... -from.html

Yu Shan (honey oolong, Taiwan)
from Hou De
2010 Autumn Yu-Shan Organic Honey-Aroma Oolong, Hand-Harvested ...
Hou De Asian Art & Fine Teas 2010 Autumn Yu-Shan Organic Honey-Aroma Oolong, Hand-Harvested - Harvest: 2010 Autumn Method: Hand harvest


Dong Ding (Premium, from Hojo)
as seen here: http://hojotea.com/item_e/o06e.htm
------------------------------------------------------------



By "pairing", I mean which of the above are safe to brew in the same pot. I assume that most high elevation oolongs that have similar roasting/oxidation characteristics can all be brewed in the same pot. But for now, let's just work with the teas in my list.

Of course, I *could* dedicate each to a pot. Simplest (but not the most economical) solution. In this case, some pots would go unused for a time, which would be a shame. Using this method I'll end up with a lot of pots.

I know I asked a pretty loaded question over which there is still plenty of debate, but I'd certainly appreciate some direction in this matter.

Thanks for reading,

Christian
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Re: Which of these oolongs can be paired?

Postby edkrueger » May 2nd, '11, 10:39

All of those should be fine in the same pot, especially the same zhuni pot.
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Re: Which of these oolongs can be paired?

Postby teaisme » May 2nd, '11, 16:29

+1
kinda agree there, they really shouldn't interfere with each other very much (as long as you don't let the green oolongs sit too long after brewing) , but finding a pot that brews all of these optimally to your taste would be a more difficult task

It would prob be easier to just find one pot suitable for the greener taiwan oolongs, then one that is good for the roasted ones. I find that the one usually good with the roasted ones also works pretty well with blacks.
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Re: Which of these oolongs can be paired?

Postby edkrueger » May 2nd, '11, 19:46

churng wrote:+1
kinda agree there, they really shouldn't interfere with each other very much (as long as you don't let the green oolongs sit too long after brewing) , but finding a pot that brews all of these optimally to your taste would be a more difficult task

It would prob be easier to just find one pot suitable for the greener taiwan oolongs, then one that is good for the roasted ones. I find that the one usually good with the roasted ones also works pretty well with blacks.


I think that is too specific when dealing with zhuni. I'd just find one zhuni that is great for oolong in each size you need. [The blacks, however do need a different pot. I usually brew them in a porcelain gong fu pot, but I don't gong fu blacks too often anyways.] However, I think you are right about finding the pot that brews the tea best. I'd say its more important to find the pot the brews the tea the best. Any of Ting's links should help with that.
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