Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?


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Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby fire_snake » Aug 22nd, '11, 10:25

Hi Teaheads:

So are there any adverse, long-term effects (perhaps similar to, but not limited to, alcohol consumption)? Brain cell "death", etc. Might be a silly question, so go easy. :wink:

I'm asking because I am getting the most magnificent buzz from Stefan's Winter Wild Concubine. I'm grandpa-ing it in a mug. I'm on the fourth infusion (I think) and I'm just waaaay out there. It's delightful. It's the second time in a week I'm doing this. The buzz lasts for hours.

I assume it's fine, because after all, what better substance to put into your body than Oolong?

Just checking, though.

Christian
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby tingjunkie » Aug 22nd, '11, 23:09

The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby gingkoseto » Aug 24th, '11, 07:03

tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)

:lol: :lol:
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby fire_snake » Aug 25th, '11, 13:56

:lol: :lol:

Thanks for putting my mind at ease.

I'm doing it again, this time with the 2011 Spring Si Ji Chun Oolong from Zhu Shan.

We'll see what develops. :wink:

Christian

EDIT:

The lighter Oolong (as opposed to the Winter Wild Concubine) produced far less of a buzz after multiple infusions, and didn't last quite as long. Still very nice, though. It goes down very smooth and the taste, while not robust, is very pleasant.
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby BioHorn » Aug 26th, '11, 12:40

(A bit off forum, but) If you are looking for a cha qi buzz, try Tim's Mandarin Tea Room '06 Sheng Puerh.
fire_snake wrote::lol: :lol:

Thanks for putting my mind at ease.

I'm doing it again, this time with the 2011 Spring Si Ji Chun Oolong from Zhu Shan.

We'll see what develops. :wink:

Christian

EDIT:

The lighter Oolong (as opposed to the Winter Wild Concubine) produced far less of a buzz after multiple infusions, and didn't last quite as long. Still very nice, though. It goes down very smooth and the taste, while not robust, is very pleasant.
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby fire_snake » Aug 26th, '11, 14:23

Ah yes, the Puerh.

I've heard some interesting (and very encouraging) stories. I haven't had any decent Puerh yet. However I fear that if I do, whatever level of EWS and TAD I already have will be terminal.

I hear there is no cure for Puerh. Only more Puerh.

Christian


BioHorn wrote:(A bit off forum, but) If you are looking for a cha qi buzz, try Tim's Mandarin Tea Room '06 Sheng Puerh.
fire_snake wrote::lol: :lol:

Thanks for putting my mind at ease.

I'm doing it again, this time with the 2011 Spring Si Ji Chun Oolong from Zhu Shan.

We'll see what develops. :wink:

Christian

EDIT:

The lighter Oolong (as opposed to the Winter Wild Concubine) produced far less of a buzz after multiple infusions, and didn't last quite as long. Still very nice, though. It goes down very smooth and the taste, while not robust, is very pleasant.
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby bagua7 » Aug 26th, '11, 23:10

fire_snake wrote:Hi Teaheads:

So are there any adverse, long-term effects (perhaps similar to, but not limited to, alcohol consumption)? Brain cell "death", etc. Might be a silly question, so go easy. :wink:


Thinking too much causes more damage to your brain, trust me. :wink:

tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)


Did you just read my mind? :shock:

:lol:
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby sherubtse » Aug 27th, '11, 15:54

tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)


Some folks may also suffer from mild (or major) addiction to caffeine. Like coffee, drinking lots of tea can make one dependent on caffeine. Cutting down or ceasing its consumption will then result in nausea and headaches.

Best wishes,
sherubtse
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby the_economist » Aug 27th, '11, 17:11

therefore, don't cut down :)
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby Chip » Aug 27th, '11, 21:09

sherubtse wrote:
tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)


Some folks may also suffer from mild (or major) addiction to caffeine. Like coffee, drinking lots of tea can make one dependent on caffeine. Cutting down or ceasing its consumption will then result in nausea and headaches.

Best wishes,
sherubtse

Not to mention irritabiliTea! :twisted:
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby Catfur » Aug 27th, '11, 21:31

Chip wrote:
sherubtse wrote:
tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)


Some folks may also suffer from mild (or major) addiction to caffeine. Like coffee, drinking lots of tea can make one dependent on caffeine. Cutting down or ceasing its consumption will then result in nausea and headaches.

Best wishes,
sherubtse

Not to mention irritabiliTea! :twisted:


Does Adagio sell that one?
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby sherubtse » Aug 29th, '11, 13:59

the_economist wrote:therefore, don't cut down :)


Sometimes it is unavoidable .... :(

Best wishes,
sherubtse
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby Oni » Sep 12th, '11, 01:50

tingjunkie wrote:The only long term effects of high quality oolong consumption I worry about are EWS and TAD. (Empty Wallet Syndrome and Teaware Acquisition Disorder)

This illness is very common and unpleasent among tea drinkers, tea and teaware are getting ever more expencieve, it is becoming the playground for rich people, but I really need the teaware from time to time, it makes me soo happy.
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Re: Neurological/Physiological effects of tea-drunkenness?

Postby tingjunkie » Sep 12th, '11, 17:34

I hear ya Oni. With the way China's economy is going, I see buying Yixing pots as building a savings account I can use and appreciate! That's provided I don't drop or get hopelessly attached to my pots of course. I have a feeling it will be more like a savings account I'm building for my future generations who won't care about selling them off! :lol:
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