theanine high


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Re: theanine high

Postby FlyedPiper » Jul 20th, '11, 21:53

Theanine can also be purchased in pill form. The Japanese add it to soft drinks and a lot of other things. It's perfectly safe and non-habit forming. I keep L-Theanine on hand for caffeine overdoses and sleep. It's great for "catching up" on quality sleep, as it causes a deep, restful sleep. I usually find myself waking up an hour or two earlier than usual when I take it- fully rested.

Also, if you're looking for a natural anti-anxiety medication the suppliments might be a good choice. Look for suntheanine. It's more potent.

Matcha is the king of theanine in it's natural, unsynthesized form.
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Re:

Postby oak » Aug 5th, '11, 15:15

ryan wrote:Glad this topic is getting some traffic!

I also suffer from anxiety as well which may be why tea has a more dramatic effect on me than other people I have shared tea with. I haven't noticed the effect with anything other than green tea but its possible that is because I drink good quality green but cheap everything else. =)


It happens to me with gyokuro, sencha and pu erh. But doesn't happen to me with black tea. I don't know why, and don't believe that it is for the price because I buy vey cheaply in ebay. I like to try everything and the budget does not give for any more.

Of all forms I had to fit to the minimum the grams of these teas.
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Re: theanine high

Postby Sam. » Aug 5th, '11, 19:07

The most profound theanine high I've experienced has been with sheng pu-erh. After I reach the 5th or later brew in a short session I often begin to feel a palpable head high.
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Re: theanine high

Postby Mintaka » Sep 7th, '11, 17:19

I have this sensation with most teas. It's one of the many reasons I love drinking it so much. Though recently I've noticed it mostly with matcha (because of the high level of theanine and since we consume the entire leaf minus veins and stems). Some others that seem to work well with me are greener oolongs, strongly brewed greens and some assams.

I love it. It coats my brain with a feeling of calm and blissful wellbeing. Similar to having your head massaged, but internally. That sounds kinda weird, but it's the best way I can describe it.

Yay tea highs. :mrgreen:
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Re: theanine high

Postby Flonihoncha » Sep 12th, '11, 10:26

Theanine is an amino-acid which produced in the brain the release of alpha-waves creating the sensation of relaxation.
Together with others amino-acids, theanine is the main element of green tea sweetness/umami taste.
The quantity of theanine is particularly high in shade grown teas such as gyokuro and matcha (and kabuse-cha). Theanine seems to be produced in the roots, then it goes on the leaves where it began be to transformed into a tanin, the catechine (a poly-phenol) under the influence of photosynthesis (there if of course intermediate phases).
So, as the time goes by, the sweet theanine rate in leaves is getting down as astringent cathechine rate is growing up. By shading threes, we can diminuate the photosynthesis effect and then, obtain leaves with more theanine.
By the way, there is similar process with caffeine. Shade grown teas contains also more cafeine than usual ones.

Comparative data of teas types elements rates (% of dry parts, Tanin/Cafeine/Amino acid):
Superior gyokuro : 10.74 / 3.48 / 4.77%
Superior matcha : 7.83 / 3.29 / 5.50%
Superior sencha : 13.44 / 2.64 / 2.94%
Low grade sencha : 14.43 / 2.94 / 1.57%
Superior Kamairi cha : 13.33 / 2.59 / 3.55 %
(from the textbook (II) of the Nihoncha Instructor Association)
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Re: theanine high

Postby sherubtse » Sep 12th, '11, 13:36

Flonihoncha wrote:Theanine is an amino-acid which produced in the brain the release of alpha-waves creating the sensation of relaxation.
Together with others amino-acids, theanine is the main element of green tea sweetness/umami taste.
The quantity of theanine is particularly high in shade grown teas such as gyokuro and matcha (and kabuse-cha). Theanine seems to be produced in the roots, then it goes on the leaves where it began be to transformed into a tanin, the catechine (a poly-phenol) under the influence of photosynthesis (there if of course intermediate phases).
So, as the time goes by, the sweet theanine rate in leaves is getting down as astringent cathechine rate is growing up. By shading threes, we can diminuate the photosynthesis effect and then, obtain leaves with more theanine.
By the way, there is similar process with caffeine. Shade grown teas contains also more cafeine than usual ones.

Comparative data of teas types elements rates (% of dry parts, Tanin/Cafeine/Amino acid):
Superior gyokuro : 10.74 / 3.48 / 4.77%
Superior matcha : 7.83 / 3.29 / 5.50%
Superior sencha : 13.44 / 2.64 / 2.94%
Low grade sencha : 14.43 / 2.94 / 1.57%
Superior Kamairi cha : 13.33 / 2.59 / 3.55 %
(from the textbook (II) of the Nihoncha Instructor Association)


Thanks for posting this info, Flonihoncha. I found it to be very interesting & informative. :)

Best wishes,
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Re: theanine high

Postby Drax » Sep 13th, '11, 07:04

Flonihoncha wrote:Theanine seems to be produced in the roots, then it goes on the leaves where it began be to transformed into a tanin, the catechine (a poly-phenol) under the influence of photosynthesis (there if of course intermediate phases).


Wow, this is an impressive claim for two chemical substances that are nowhere near related. I would really like to see the supposed biological pathways that convert theanine into a polyphenol, if you have any reference!
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Re: theanine high

Postby gingkoseto » Sep 13th, '11, 08:53

Drax wrote:
Flonihoncha wrote:Theanine seems to be produced in the roots, then it goes on the leaves where it began be to transformed into a tanin, the catechine (a poly-phenol) under the influence of photosynthesis (there if of course intermediate phases).


Wow, this is an impressive claim for two chemical substances that are nowhere near related. I would really like to see the supposed biological pathways that convert theanine into a polyphenol, if you have any reference!

Theanine is a light-sensitive chemical that gives rise to ethylamine when degraded in light. Ethylamine participates in the synthesis of catechin. :D
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Re: theanine high

Postby Drax » Sep 13th, '11, 09:13

gingkoseto wrote:
Drax wrote:
Flonihoncha wrote:Theanine seems to be produced in the roots, then it goes on the leaves where it began be to transformed into a tanin, the catechine (a poly-phenol) under the influence of photosynthesis (there if of course intermediate phases).


Wow, this is an impressive claim for two chemical substances that are nowhere near related. I would really like to see the supposed biological pathways that convert theanine into a polyphenol, if you have any reference!

Theanine is a light-sensitive chemical that gives rise to ethylamine when degraded in light. Ethylamine participates in the synthesis of catechin. :D


Thanks, gingko, I see how degradation of theanine would regenerate glutamic acid and also give ethylamine... So then, ethylamine is basically a 2-carbon source for the building of catechins (sort of like how isoprene gets used)? Any idea how the nitrogen gets recycled? (sorry for all the Qs... I love biosynthesis stuff!)
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Re: theanine high

Postby gingkoseto » Sep 13th, '11, 18:32

Drax wrote:... So then, ethylamine is basically a 2-carbon source for the building of catechins (sort of like how isoprene gets used)? Any idea how the nitrogen gets recycled? (sorry for all the Qs... I love biosynthesis stuff!)

really?! :shock:
I think ethylamine only participates into the synthesis and it's not a precursor. But I can't find a detailed illustration of the pathway, and can't believe someone would look for it :P I do have a tea chemistry ebook that I've barely read (too much organic chemistry stuff! :evil: ) but think it's a good reference book to look things up. If you are interested, pm me your email address and I can email it to you.
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Re: theanine high

Postby Drax » Sep 13th, '11, 19:22

:lol: PM sent, many thanks!

If it makes me seem more sane, I have a PhD in chemistry and I took a number of biochemistry courses along the way... Hrm, so does that make me seem more sane, or crazier...? hehe...
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Re: theanine high

Postby Terri » Sep 13th, '11, 21:58

I have crohn's disease and I can't describe the feeling I get drinking some teas..the relief it gives me that my medications can't do being it be a natural anti-inflammatory.
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Re: theanine high

Postby solitude » Sep 14th, '11, 07:10

amidic bond is very strong and usually strong acidic or alkalic conditions has to be used to break it, in nature of course these things are done by enzymes much more efficiently, and degradation by light? maybe an enzyme activated by light.

Biosynthesis of polyphenols from ethyl amine which comes from theanine is not very probable in my opinion. If it is true than this should be specific only for tea since there are many plants containing polyphenols but not theanine.
The biosynthesis of polyphenols starts usually from cinnamic acid, gallic acid and other aromatic carboxylic acids.

For those who have access to scientific journals and are interested here are some references:

nice review about the polyphenols
Plant Polyphenols: Chemical Properties, Biological
Activities, and Synthesis, Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2011, 50, 586 – 621

biosynthesis of polyphenols
From lignins to tannins: Forty years of enzyme studies on
The biosynthesis of phenolic compounds, Phytochemistry 69 (2008) 3018–3031
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Re: theanine high

Postby gingkoseto » Sep 14th, '11, 22:02

Oh my goodness, you crazy chemists! :mrgreen:

The most detailed explanation I found only says ethylamine is converted into acetaldehyde which participates (with its mere 2 carbons) into synthesis of catechin, which has >10 carbons. But I guess this contribution is still important and (at least partially) caused the fresh flavor in new green tea to turn into bitter flavor in older green tea.
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Re: theanine high

Postby Flonihoncha » Sep 15th, '11, 08:30

Nihoncha Instructor textbook explain like this:
Theanine (y-glutamylethylamide), when arrive in leaves, begin to be decomposed into glutamic acid and ethylamine. Ethylamine is decomposed into ammonia which is used in regeneration of nitrogen, and into carbon used in synthesis of cathechin and polyphenol.
Also, the role of theanine seems to be bring nitrogen from roots to leaves.

Of course, i'm sorry, my first post was a "short-cut", too simple. Products of theanine decomposition are used for the synthesis of cathechin. Important thing is to understand that if you can reduce theanine decomposition (by shading the leaves, or by reduce temperature), you also reduce cathechin and other polyphenols increase. Thats mean more umami, less astringency and bitterness.

I let more detailed stuff to chemistry lovers :D
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