tieguanyin


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Re: tieguanyin

Postby bagua7 » Aug 14th, '11, 01:08

TIM wrote:Life is tough.... 6 different grades of single estate Anxi Xiping Tikwanyin.
Ranging from 1000 meter above see level, 400+ years old bushes to lowest $120/pound.


Sure tough it is, lol.

Awesome. Where in Asia did you purchase this tea?

I hope I can get quality stuff in my next Asian trip. ;)
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby Wh&yel-appr... » Aug 16th, '11, 02:40

Drax wrote:
TIM wrote:Life is tough.... 6 different grades of single estate Anxi Xiping Tikwanyin.
Ranging from 1000 meter above see level, 400+ years old bushes to lowest $120/pound.


Neat... though, uh... any help on which is which in the picture? :oops:

+1 ...especially since it is not likely there exists a 400+ yr old bush (Dan Cong for sure, upper limit Wuyi/Da Hong Pao) TGY/Ti Kwan Yin:

http://www.xpcmd.cn/post/traditional-ti ... aking.html
“My ancestor Wei Yin discovered a naturally-grown tea tree here in 1723. He then cultivated many tea trees from the parent plant. Two years later, he named the newly-developed tea ‘Tie Guan Yin’. Over time, my ancestor came up with a set of complex procedures to produce Tie Guan Yin tea from the tea leaves. Now, almost 300 years has passed, and I have become the ninth descendant of my family’s Tie Guan Yin tea-making craftsmanship.”
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby TIM » Aug 16th, '11, 15:14

wh&yel-apprentice wrote:
Drax wrote:
TIM wrote:Life is tough.... 6 different grades of single estate Anxi Xiping Tikwanyin.
Ranging from 1000 meter above see level, 400+ years old bushes to lowest $120/pound.


Neat... though, uh... any help on which is which in the picture? :oops:

+1 ...especially since it is not likely there exists a 400+ yr old bush (Dan Cong for sure, upper limit Wuyi/Da Hong Pao) TGY/Ti Kwan Yin:

http://www.xpcmd.cn/post/traditional-ti ... aking.html
“My ancestor Wei Yin discovered a naturally-grown tea tree here in 1723. He then cultivated many tea trees from the parent plant. Two years later, he named the newly-developed tea ‘Tie Guan Yin’. Over time, my ancestor came up with a set of complex procedures to produce Tie Guan Yin tea from the tea leaves. Now, almost 300 years has passed, and I have become the ninth descendant of my family’s Tie Guan Yin tea-making craftsmanship.”


So you think Wei Yin discovered a TiKwanYin tree in 1723 was less than a year old? Plucked it and develop the process of making TKY?

Claiming your ancestor making TGY since the Mid-Qing is one thing.... Praising your Great Great Great Granny Discover the Mother tree, and trying to make a profit out of it is another.

BTW, one of the oldest tea farming family in Anxi which still use their traditional processing method after 13 generations last name is Wong. They are the first whom refine the processing method and made TGY to be a tribute tea to the Emperor in 1742.

Those tea trees been growing there since the Tang dynasty: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tang_Dynasty
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby bagua7 » Aug 29th, '11, 00:11

I need to stock up on TGY.

I was wondering if anyone has tried Xi Ping TGY (2011) from JTS?

Thanks.
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby nw-T » Aug 29th, '11, 19:57

Order some 2005 TGY from Floating Leaves!! A beautiful tea at a great price!
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby esdoudou » Sep 19th, '11, 22:54

debunix wrote:I think the debate over how many infusion max you can get from a tea is strongly biased by preferences for weaker or stronger brew. Someone like me, who likes tea more dilute, can easily enjoy more infusions from the same amount of tea, even without adding additional infusions by brewing overnight a few times.
I agree with you, and one may likes stronger taste, he/she would make less infusions and also may put more loose tea leaves~such as my grandma~~ :)
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby Bubba_tea » Oct 17th, '11, 13:06

I'm interested in trying some decent TGY - anyone else second the JTS recommendation? I haven't tried a 'good' TGY before so I'm open to suggestions. I wasn't really excited about any tea purchases this year so let me have it :lol:
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby bagua7 » Oct 18th, '11, 20:42

Well, don't go with JTS's Long Juan TGY because I tried some this morning (sample I received with a 2011 LJ order) and the quality is very average, I dare say low. :(

Image

Last month I placed an order of Jiu Jiu Jiu TGY from Wang Ling Tea House, following some of the teachatters' recommendations, and the quality was reasonable, much better than JTS's for sure. I think, it's not easy to find high quality TGY online, and if you do you'd be paying top bucks for it anyway, like any other teas.
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Re: tieguanyin

Postby Bubba_tea » Oct 20th, '11, 17:59

bagua7 wrote:Well, don't go with JTS's Long Juan TGY because I tried some this morning (sample I received with a 2011 LJ order) and the quality is very average, I dare say low..


Well - that's why I asked here... people dare to say low when it's low! I have a closet full of 'meh' tea and will experiement in making it into iced tea since it's not much use for drinking gong fu style!
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