Jiangtea

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Jiangtea

Postby Oni » Nov 30th, '11, 14:58

http://www.jiangteaonline.com

Does somebody know about this vendor, it looks interesting, they sell only high grade teas.

User avatar Oni
Posts: 1146
Joined: Nov 28, '08

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Poohblah » Nov 30th, '11, 20:17

If their tea is high grade, then this would be quite a find, because their prices are not all that high.

User avatar Poohblah
Posts: 929
Joined: Mar 04, '10
Location: somewhere over the rainbow

Re: Jiangtea

Postby wh&yel-apprentice » Nov 30th, '11, 20:57

Oni wrote:http://www.jiangteaonline.com
, they sell only high grade teas.


what makes you say that? "Superfine" has no real quality distinction, they could claim that of *any* grade from roadside schwag to Da Hong Pao from the protected trees that isn't for sale :mrgreen:

http://www.jiangteaonline.com/da-hong-pao.html
The most popular is a group by the name of Shuixian (Water Goddess, aka Chinese Sacred Lily). Yes, you are right, the same name as that traditional cheap restaurant tea. Others include Rougui, Meijian, and other cultivars from Anxi, Taiwan, and Eastern Fujian, such as various strands of wulongs and Da’bai.

copy this text from link above, put it in your browser search with Google or others and see>>> word 4 word the same as description of Wuyi on the 'teaguardian' site I gave you a link for.

Still trying to get blood from a turnip? If it looks too good to be true, it usually is.

Da Hong Pao @95USD/500G is *not* going to be "high grade' by any but the most dishonest palate/business practices...even at wholesale prices.

wh&yel-apprentice
Posts: 138
Joined: May 11, '09

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Oni » Dec 1st, '11, 02:06

wh&yel-apprentice wrote:
Oni wrote:http://www.jiangteaonline.com
, they sell only high grade teas.


what makes you say that? "Superfine" has no real quality distinction, they could claim that of *any* grade from roadside schwag to Da Hong Pao from the protected trees that isn't for sale :mrgreen:

http://www.jiangteaonline.com/da-hong-pao.html
The most popular is a group by the name of Shuixian (Water Goddess, aka Chinese Sacred Lily). Yes, you are right, the same name as that traditional cheap restaurant tea. Others include Rougui, Meijian, and other cultivars from Anxi, Taiwan, and Eastern Fujian, such as various strands of wulongs and Da’bai.

copy this text from link above, put it in your browser search with Google or others and see>>> word 4 word the same as description of Wuyi on the 'teaguardian' site I gave you a link for.

Still trying to get blood from a turnip? If it looks too good to be true, it usually is.

Da Hong Pao @95USD/500G is *not* going to be "high grade' by any but the most dishonest palate/business practices...even at wholesale prices.

If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is not. I always take these highest grade claims with a grain of salt, one cannot tell the diffrence between teas by looking at a picture, teachat is a good way of sharing experience, I trust yor opinion more than the sweet talk of a vendor.

User avatar Oni
Posts: 1146
Joined: Nov 28, '08

Re: Jiangtea

Postby bryan_drinks_tea » Dec 1st, '11, 10:27

of course they sell 'fine tea'. :wink: no vendor would ever be caught selling cheap crap. :lol:
It's also kinda funny that they are selling a raw pu'er from "1997" for 46 bucks. With all due respect to the OP - I wouldn't recommend buying tea from this vendor.

User avatar bryan_drinks_tea
Posts: 510
Joined: Oct 07, '09
Location: South Carolina
Contact bryan_drinks_tea:

Re: Jiangtea

Postby AlexZorach » Dec 1st, '11, 12:51

I agree with others' skepticism. I see heavy use of the terms "topgrade" and "supergrade", but what does this mean? For example, they sell Shou Mei, $20 for 250 grams, but I've sampled quite a lot of this style of tea and just looking at their picture of dry leaf, it's not anywhere near the highest grade/quality of this tea that I've seen...the leaf is mostly broken, and I've bought mostly unbroken shou mei for a lower price. This doesn't guarantee that it's not great quality...who knows if the photos accurately reflect the tea?

I can't really truly say anything about this company without actually trying their teas, but I would not be like, super impressed.

I also don't like that they don't offer samples or even small sizes. 250g or 500g of tea is a lot of tea to be stuck with if it turns out to be low quality.

User avatar AlexZorach
Posts: 285
Joined: Sep 23, '09
Contact AlexZorach:

Re: Jiangtea

Postby wh&yel-apprentice » Dec 1st, '11, 15:12

From teaguardian's author/site owner Leo Kwan in response to an email I sent alerting them to the issue:

Thank you very much for warning us of the copyright infringement incident. It seems to me that the site you named is copying materials from a few sources, including some writings I did before Tea Guardian. This is common in Mainland Chinese behavior, however depressing the situation is


Lol, Leo is Chinese so I don't think TC member Ginko can get upset about any 'cultural' stereotype implications :D

Hmm, to answer Oni's question here and on other threads in trying to get the best quality teas for 'eye-of-the-beholder' 'cheaper' 'more reasonable prices'

IIRC, there have been some comments already about JerryMa's less that 'great' quality teas, at what seem like bargain prices...much lower than Dragon Tea House. But then not *everyone* thinks DTH has the real 'quality' teas...only you can decide for yourself, unfortunately. I see all kinds of ratings good and bad on Steepster.

How about that AAAAA Long Jing or AAA+ DHP?
http://www.ebay.com/itm/2011-Pre-Ming-S ... 3f08e8486d

Think I'd rather have the microscopic sized just forming buds in the AAAAAAAAAAAAA+++++ grade- surely it must better than all the others >>> does tea master processing really matter at all? :P I do give credit for detailed images showing sizes of various grades of LJ they are selling.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/Special-Grade-D ... 415b5862fe

^500g@$65 USD! For AAA+ grade, surely must be the highest quality ever! Can at least give JerryMa credit for naming the 'brand' manufacturer/distributor of that particular tea.

http://www.ebay.com/itm/2011-Spring-Sup ... 3f089e3b8c

^unfortunately, as with almost *all* tea sellers, there is no way to distinguish what various grades actually denote/define>>>what is the difference btw "supreme & premium", or super this, or "royal" "imperial" that???:

http://teamasters.blogspot.com/2009/06/ ... om-lu.html
Stephane on Lu Shan tea:
It's not easy to get me excited with Jinxuan Oolong. That's why I don't select it very often. The vast majority are high yield, low elevation productions aimed at beginners (= cheap and fragrant). They are to tea what rosé is to wine drinkers.

And yet, there are some specialized wineries that make very good rosé. Likewise, there are also some excellent Jinxuan Oolongs to be found. What you need are good ingredients: a high mountain plantation, good spring weather and a farmer dedicated to quality.

wh&yel-apprentice
Posts: 138
Joined: May 11, '09

Re: Jiangtea

Postby gingkoseto » Dec 1st, '11, 23:25

wh&yel-apprentice wrote:From teaguardian's author/site owner Leo Kwan in response to an email I sent alerting them to the issue:

Thank you very much for warning us of the copyright infringement incident. It seems to me that the site you named is copying materials from a few sources, including some writings I did before Tea Guardian. This is common in Mainland Chinese behavior, however depressing the situation is


Lol, Leo is Chinese so I don't think TC member Ginko can get upset about any 'cultural' stereotype implications :D



Oh I do get upset and would openly express it... I get equally upset when Americans say American kids are not good at math... I don't think this is even about China, or tea sellers, or commercial activities... I think this is about how people see this world with different approaches.

Ignorance has no country boundaries. Frowning power is small on each individual, but better than tolerating ignorance. :twisted:

On the other hand, I do agree this kind of behavior happens a lot in China (although not sure what he means about the difference between mainland and non-mainland). In rapid economic development, human greed is expressed in most bold ways. This happens/happened in a lot of countries during their rapid economic growth. Then when a society is more economically developed, only a small number of people can steal and rob without being punished by the law.

Last edited by gingkoseto on Dec 3rd, '11, 09:12, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar gingkoseto
Vendor Member
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24, '08
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Cole » Dec 1st, '11, 23:45

If Jerry's DHP and other oolongs aren't high quality, I'd love to hear a couple other recommendations. I enjoyed his samples very much, but I'm also utterly new to chinese oolongs; so it's hard for me to be partial.

I have nothing but good things to say about his puerh and shipping habits, although I find his grading system to be a little tough to decipher. I enjoyed his AA+ DHP more than the AAA+, but I'm not sure if I was brewing it correctly.

User avatar Cole
Posts: 108
Joined: May 15, '11

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Tead Off » Dec 2nd, '11, 00:33

Cole wrote:If Jerry's DHP and other oolongs aren't high quality, I'd love to hear a couple other recommendations. I enjoyed his samples very much, but I'm also utterly new to chinese oolongs; so it's hard for me to be partial.

I have nothing but good things to say about his puerh and shipping habits, although I find his grading system to be a little tough to decipher. I enjoyed his AA+ DHP more than the AAA+, but I'm not sure if I was brewing it correctly.

If you are new to tea drinking, it will take quite awhile to be able to decipher what people call high quality from mediocre. The main thing is to enjoy the tea you are drinking and try recommendations from posters who mention certain vendors who are known for selling good teas. You will not always agree with others, but, the point is to develop your own taste and pay attention to your own experience.

User avatar Tead Off
Vendor Member
Posts: 4503
Joined: Apr 01, '09
Location: Bangkok

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Oni » Dec 2nd, '11, 04:59

I observed that ebay tea is low grade stuff, Hojo enlightened me, when I compared his Tai Ping Hou Kui to dragon teahouses top grade, but this leaves me with few options from where to buy tea, because lower grades do not satisfy me anymore, I need high end stuff, I trust very few vendors for this.

User avatar Oni
Posts: 1146
Joined: Nov 28, '08

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Cole » Dec 2nd, '11, 11:59

Thanks, TeadOff!

I've got a couple more of Jerry's samples to work through, and a bag of DHP I bought from Puerh shop (which I don't expect to be stellar), so I was just fishing for suggestions of reliable vendors. I've been drinking loose leaf tea for over 10 years, but the only reason why I even tried (and discovered that I enjoyed) chinese oolongs was because Jerry was so forthcoming with the samples. Now that I'm almost out, I'm wondering where to proceed next!

All the conjecture in the world won't make a tea taste good -- the only way to truly understand any tea is through firsthand experience and experimentation. TeaChat is such a useful bastion of knowledge, I just can't help but poll you folks and try and give back whenever I can help someone else in need.

User avatar Cole
Posts: 108
Joined: May 15, '11

Re: Jiangtea

Postby chinatealover » Dec 4th, '11, 21:20

Actually, I have noticed that Jiangteaonline is a china loose tea wholesaler in China, they select the super grade tea in their wholesale shop and put them on the retail online shop..
jiangteaonline dot com/about dash jiangtea dot html

Actually, when you go to China wholesale market, and they are not so expensive like on the retail market...

and they have a blog, they are trying to promote china tea knowledge and china tea culture.. but as chinese, they are good at English..
they would use "google translate tool and ...
jiangtea dot blog dot com/

Last edited by Chip on Dec 5th, '11, 02:01, edited 2 times in total.
Reason: [Moderator edits, links broken] see forum rules under Introductions regarding self promoting posting/linking and new members posting links.
chinatealover
Posts: 1
Joined: Dec 04, '11

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Chip » Dec 4th, '11, 22:52

chinatealover wrote:Actually, I have noticed that Jiangteaonline is a china loose tea wholesaler in China, they select the super grade tea in their wholesale shop and put them on the retail online shop..

Actually, when you go to China wholesale market, and they are not so expensive like on the retail market...

and they have a blog, they are trying to promote china tea knowledge and china tea culture.. but as chinese, they are good at English..
they would use "google translate tool and ...

They, they, they? Do you not mean "we, we, we," Richard Jiang? Or is this an amazing coincidence?

Please see our forum rules under TeaChat Announcements and User Guide.

User avatar Chip
Mod/Admin
Posts: 22818
Joined: Apr 22, '06
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Jiangtea

Postby Oni » Dec 5th, '11, 06:28

The vast majority of tea comes from a wholesale market, it is their behavior shown at the movie "All in this tea" that worries me, like blending higher quality tea from the right origin with other similar teas and selling it as a famous tea, like the laws that permit to use a famous name if the tea contains at leas 50% of it, it should be 100 % if you are asking me, teas should have a protected origin, and tea farmers should be protected from the abusive market, something like fair trade would be good, there are local farmers who sell high quality tea and they are not appreciated, there are few of those that reach the western market.
I mean tea from wholesale large market can be very good, but I am willing to pay more for small scale super high quality controlled origin tea.

User avatar Oni
Posts: 1146
Joined: Nov 28, '08


Today's Poll



Community

In total there are 2 users online :: 1 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest