Brewing Grandpa Style


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Brewing Grandpa Style

Postby sherubtse » Jul 27th, '12, 15:35

I have had my first few sessions brewing "grandpa style". And, in general, they haven't been at all sucessfull.

Anyone have any tips or suggestions for how to get this technique right? What others seem to take for granted is a real challenge for me.

Thanks.

Best wishes,
sherubtse
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Re: Brewing Grandpa Style

Postby AdamMY » Jul 27th, '12, 17:18

Most importantly is the tea you are using, some tea lends itself to grandpa style wonderfully, while others are just lack luster. But just like any style of brewing you need to be able to adjust based on the tea itself.

For greener teas, I often just cover them in hot water then wait a bit for things to cool ( both the kettle and the water in the bowl) before I top it off with water. For darker teas, I do something similar but usually fill about half way, instead of just to cover. This I found helps keeps the leave settled at the bottom, and while developing a good sound root, does not overly stew the leaves to no end ( hence why greener teas get less water so the water that hits them cools a lot quicker).

That is the biggest trick I have found.
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Re: Brewing Grandpa Style

Postby sherubtse » Jul 27th, '12, 19:32

AdamMY wrote:Most importantly is the tea you are using, some tea lends itself to grandpa style wonderfully, while others are just lack luster. But just like any style of brewing you need to be able to adjust based on the tea itself.

For greener teas, I often just cover them in hot water then wait a bit for things to cool ( both the kettle and the water in the bowl) before I top it off with water. For darker teas, I do something similar but usually fill about half way, instead of just to cover. This I found helps keeps the leave settled at the bottom, and while developing a good sound root, does not overly stew the leaves to no end ( hence why greener teas get less water so the water that hits them cools a lot quicker).

That is the biggest trick I have found.


Many thanks for the help, Adam! :)

Your comments re over-stewing the leaves are especially helpful. That is something I really need to work on not doing.

Best wishes,
sherubtse
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Re: Brewing Grandpa Style

Postby sherubtse » Jul 28th, '12, 06:16

AdamMY wrote:Most importantly is the tea you are using, some tea lends itself to grandpa style wonderfully, while others are just lack luster.


Which teas have you found to be the best to brew this way?

Thanks.

Best wishes,
sherubtse
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Location: Toronto, Canada

Re: Brewing Grandpa Style

Postby AdamMY » Jul 28th, '12, 10:19

sherubtse wrote:
Which teas have you found to be the best to brew this way?

Thanks.

Best wishes,
sherubtse


Less delicate teas, such as green teas that tend to have a lot of body. Hong Cha ( Red/ Black teas), Oolongs are really difficult, in theory Yancha should work, but I've had a harder time getting it to work properly with Yancha. But oddly enough I did get a decent grandpa style session with a Taiwanese Gaoshan.
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