Official Pu of the day


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby BioHorn » Oct 2nd, '12, 15:34

Staring at 30 g of '97 7542. Sure wish I had a tong of this cake...
May have gone overboard on the sharpen. Still getting used to these small images sizes (ahem...Chip.)
Image

Nice red beet juice example. I love this tea.

This pic came put pretty funky with the photo editing software. The tea is not so red.
Image

Clumps of dirt on beetroot.
Image
User avatar
BioHorn
 
Posts: 526
Joined: May 2nd, '1
Location: Shaker Heights, Ohio USA

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 3rd, '12, 01:33

These days, I've been chipping away at this 2006 Xizhihao "yin" cake. It gives a kick-start to my mornings. Good energy without the jitters.

Image
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby debunix » Oct 4th, '12, 00:05

A drop-chunk-of-tea-into-thermos-and-run day today, and the 2007 Golden Needle White Lotus was up to the task, sweet, caramelicious, and a bit earthy despite several hours neglectful steeping.

I only have another 3 or 4 sessions of this tea left. Might be time to put another beeng on the shopping list--there's always a need for a reliable dump it in & run tea in my office tea drawer.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 5036
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby jayinhk » Oct 5th, '12, 14:29

2005 CNNP 7542 I got direct from Kunming last week. I broke up about 80g of it today. The first few infusions are still a little more bitter and astringent than I'd like, but the aroma is great. I transferred the tea from my porcelain pot to my Yixing at around infusion four and the difference was staggering. Drinking sheng (or even aged shu) out of porcelain just doesn't do it for me anymore!
User avatar
jayinhk
 
Posts: 913
Joined: Aug 28th, '

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 7th, '12, 20:23

I revisited the 2001 Menghai Yiwu Zhengsan single estate sheng, which as I remember, a personal favorite of Davelcorp http://puerh-tea.livejournal.com/78414.html a few years back. It was also reviewed by the wise Hobbes http://half-dipper.blogspot.com/2007/05/2001-menghai-yiwu-zhengshan.html.

At 11 years of age, it certainly is showing a sign of maturity. Its color now deeper brown/red than when I first obtained it. The tea liquor is smooth with great clarity. What's most interesting is the chaqi: heavy and calming at the same time. Heavy in the sense that I felt my body sank with a heavy feeling, though in a very relaxing and calming sort of way. Warmth spread throughout my body, causing light perspiration. It's a welcome feeling.

Image
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby shah82 » Oct 7th, '12, 20:30

How do you feel your teas are aging, in general? Do you have a special pumidor?
shah82
 
Posts: 1135
Joined: May 9th, '0

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 7th, '12, 21:54

shah82 wrote:How do you feel your teas are aging, in general? Do you have a special pumidor?


Shah: the small stash that I keep at home is probably not aging as ideally considering that it is kept in a closed cabinet with a bowl of water to keep the alcove from getting too dry. Los Angeles air can be unforgiving in its dryness, for pu'er tea at least.

Most of my pu'er, however, are sleeping at an offsite wine-storage facility, where the temperature and humidity are controlled (~60'F/~60%). I'd like to believe that that's a more ideal environment for tea-keeping. But honestly, I haven't had the chance to do a side-by-side tasting between a tea that I have at home vs. the tea that I keep offsite.

So, I'm curious to find out, too. I do have a few more of this same 2001 Menghai Yiwu Zhengsan tea offsite -- the one at home being from the same tong as the rest. So it would be interesting to do a side-by-side tasting to find out just how the offsite environment is treating my teas.
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby shah82 » Oct 8th, '12, 00:09

I've been nursing a theory that a more ambient approach to storage makes for more interesting old tea. Cook it too evenly with a static humidity, and you'll get a cake with one major theme. Variance allows for different colonies of microflora to be active at different times, resulting in a more complex aged cake. That's why a proper warehouse technique is valuable, and well done traditional storage is superior to simple wet storage--as the jians are regularly moved to different microclimates in the warehouse. Do be advised that puerh needs *heat*, from what I understand. 60 degrees F strikes me as too cool.

The Menghai One-Leaf is, at least, a cheaper tea! Can get it from Skip4tea for about $245. Which is kind of unusual, since many 2001 Yiwu are quite expensive. I have noticed that the enthusiasm for this tea has gone down over time, with some cites of weakness in the soup. So it's interesting that you found it good. Perhaps it's all about outwaiting quiet periods, or something.
shah82
 
Posts: 1135
Joined: May 9th, '0

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 8th, '12, 02:54

Shah: I think what you said about ambient approach to storage is not a mere theory, but in fact what's done by pu'er traders and collectors. Had I the mean to do so, I would've done the same. The problem with LA climate for tea storage is its excessive dryness. So, lacking a dedicated space at home that I can use to store my teas properly, it seemed to me that the wine storage facility is the lesser evil -- it has got the humidity and the temperature is not devastatingly cold -- at least I hope not. So I placed most of my teas there not because I think it's better than your theory, but because it is the best option I have at the moment.

Regarding the 2001 Menghai Yiwu Zhengsan tea, thinking back to today's morning session with it, the tea soup was indeed nothing special. It's simply and ordinarily pleasant: smooth and characteristically Yiwu in taste profile. But what striked me as very welcoming was how my body reacted to it. I literally felt so relaxed and calmed, a feeling not unlike being in a meditative mood during a qigong exercise. That I liked very much! The tea soup, taste and mouthfeel seemed secondary and unimportant when the chaqi impresses me positively. My 2 cents.

You seem very much in-touch with the market, prices and product varieties. Are you in the tea trade by any chance?
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby shah82 » Oct 8th, '12, 11:59

Traditional geek monomania.
shah82
 
Posts: 1135
Joined: May 9th, '0

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 8th, '12, 13:51

shah82 wrote:Traditional geek monomania.


Hey, no need to throw insults! :lol:
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby 135F2 » Oct 8th, '12, 17:55

This morning I found a 1992 Xiaguan tuocha hiding among my stash at home and I decided to give it a go. I can't remember the last time I brewed it, but it must have been years ago. It was purchased from a tea friend, who at the time was unloading a number of stuff for cheap, and I got this tuocha for a mere $10.

It's now 20 years old. It made me wonder how an aged, cheap, Xiaguan tuocha would fare.

The most pleasant thing about this tea is the smell of the leaves. When dry, it gives off a lot of fruity high notes (plummy). When wet, a good amount of green, grassy notes are present, too.

As with XG tuochas that I have come across, the compression is very dense. So much so that I overestimated the amount of dry leaves that went inside my gaiwan.

8s, 8s, 10s, 10s, 12s, 15s

The liquor is not impressive. It's cloudy and rough on the mouth and throat. The body is thin. The feeling or energy that I get from this tea was weak, a bit messy and heady, which I did not enjoy.

To sum, except for its decent fragrance, it's an unimpressive 20 years-old tea.

Image
User avatar
135F2
 
Posts: 89
Joined: Oct 2nd, '1
Location: Los Angeles

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Catfur » Oct 8th, '12, 18:27

Those pics don't look like 20 year old tea to me. Guess your home storage is ultra dry.
User avatar
Catfur
 
Posts: 128
Joined: Jun 19th, '
Location: Carlsbad, NM

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby shah82 » Oct 8th, '12, 18:45

Yeah, you can find sales of this sort of stuff in puerh livejournal.

The fact of the matter is, Houde still has '80s tuo still for sale. There be a reason why most dry stored tuos are not popular. Zillions upon zillions of years to age that iron sucka. If I had it here in Atlanta, it wouldn't be great. There are Singpore dry storage 1999/2000 Dayi/Lincang Tea Factory tuos that just aren't that interesting. If one keeps up with the Chinese forums, there are various disappointed threads about how their early 2k Xiagun tuo hasn't aged a day since they bought it all that time ago.
shah82
 
Posts: 1135
Joined: May 9th, '0

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby wyardley » Oct 8th, '12, 20:33

I agree that, for Xiaguan tea, the tight compression means this is plausible as early 90s based on the color of the tea, and the pictures of the leaves.

But, this is one reason that, for my taste, this kind of tea is best with some pretty heavy traditional storage. I have some 90s xiaguan cakes (also tightly compressed) which are still fairly fresh tasting, despite having some less-than-dry storage.
User avatar
wyardley
 
Posts: 1927
Joined: Jan 11th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation