Liu An/Liu Bao Cha


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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby kingslam » Nov 6th, '12, 02:04

There are two kinds of Liu An.
One kind is wrapped and aged from green leaf.
However, SunYiShun Liu An is not prepared this way.
SunYiShun Liu An is fermented before wrapping and storage, so it often tastes old then its actual age.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby ImmortaliTEA » Nov 6th, '12, 05:25

I was of the opinion that SunyiShun produced both versions of the Liu An baskets and if I'm correct, in this article in Art of Tea Magazine they opened and tasted a 1940's version of SunYiShun Liu An. Why would they make such a big deal about it if it was the fermented variety as you say SunYiShun only produces? Here's the link:
http://www.the-art-of-tea.com/publicati ... ation.html

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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby gasninja » Nov 6th, '12, 10:57

kingslam wrote:There are two kinds of Liu An.
One kind is wrapped and aged from green leaf.
However, SunYiShun Liu An is not prepared this way.
SunYiShun Liu An is fermented before wrapping and storage, so it often tastes old then its actual age.

While it is true that NOW there are two types of lui an produced. I believe before it was stopped being produced in the 50's there was only green lui an but I could be wrong on that. I am also fairly certain Sun Yi Shun now produces green lui an .
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby kingslam » Nov 8th, '12, 02:29

ImmortaliTEA wrote:I was of the opinion that SunyiShun produced both versions of the Liu An baskets and if I'm correct, in this article in Art of Tea Magazine they opened and tasted a 1940's version of SunYiShun Liu An. Why would they make such a big deal about it if it was the fermented variety as you say SunYiShun only produces? Here's the link:
http://www.the-art-of-tea.com/publicati ... ation.html

ImmortaliTEA-


I got my information off the Chinese websites, but it could be wrong.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby wyardley » Nov 8th, '12, 02:59

kingslam wrote:
ImmortaliTEA wrote:I was of the opinion that SunyiShun produced both versions of the Liu An baskets and if I'm correct, in this article in Art of Tea Magazine they opened and tasted a 1940's version of SunYiShun Liu An. Why would they make such a big deal about it if it was the fermented variety as you say SunYiShun only produces? Here's the link:
http://www.the-art-of-tea.com/publicati ... ation.html

I got my information off the Chinese websites, but it could be wrong.


I am by no means an expert on the subject, but I don't think the operation(s) producing Sunyishun since the 80s or 90s is the same outfit that existed before the gap in production. As I understand it, tea produced under that name now is just trading on a famous name from the past.

But the ticket style and name are definitely copied from a tea that was produced before 1943.

Unfortunately, there's no full version online, but some of the other articles in that issue of AoT are worth a read, especially this one:

http://www.the-art-of-tea.com/publicati ... n-tea.html

Basically, according to the author of that article, because the gap in production was so long, even people in that area may not know exactly how the tea was produced -- in other words, a lot of knowledge was lost somewhere along the way, and also, while there is obviously a "right" answer, it may not be clearly agreed on.

I summarized a little bit of the information from that issue in these two threads, in case it's any help, though I don't have a clear answer on how the old liu'an is produced (I've always been under the impression it was essentially raw tea, but I don't have anything to back that up):
viewtopic.php?p=215995#p215995
http://teadrunk.org/topic/256/liuan-and ... roduction/
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby futurebird » Mar 26th, '13, 12:42

jayinhk wrote:Liu'an is fast becoming one of my favorite teas. I love the flavor and it does good things for me. :) It's categorized as an 'old man's tea' here in HK, but I love the stuff! Also since it's less popular, well aged loose liu'an is also very reasonably priced. I could very realistically drink this stuff all day every day.

I got some of the 'fragrant' variety from a dealer near me too. The little flowers really pack a lot of aroma (overpowering early on), but the tea itself is very, very nice, especially in later infusions. Great hui tian and a very pleasant light date flavor, and I can get around 15 good infusions from it.



Wow. I like it too. It has a medicinal taste, but in a good way. I find it's good in the winter. Like cold medicine.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby jayinhk » Mar 27th, '13, 00:47

I hear it's good with dried mandarin peel; I personally prefer to drink it straight. It's very calming and settles my stomach like a good shu.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby jayinhk » Aug 28th, '13, 00:39

Drinking some now--I bought 600g of loose liu an last year (I think) and have had it aging on the counter in a brown paper bag. It tastes much more interesting now--sweet and sour date/prune.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby Teaism » Aug 28th, '13, 01:23

jayinhk wrote:I hear it's good with dried mandarin peel; I personally prefer to drink it straight. It's very calming and settles my stomach like a good shu.


Yes I do that often with aged (20-30years old) mandarin peel. They used to have a lot of it in Hong Kong but the last I sourced in HK last year, most are quite new. I can still find some good aged ones in Singapore and Malaysia. The newer mandarin peel can also be used but it has a different ambience. The best mandarin peel is around 20years old. Too old, it looses its vibrancy. Too young it lacks smoothness and dimension.

I still have a few hundred grams left of 1950s Liu Ann so it taste really nice with aged mandarin peel. For Liu Ann, even without the mandarin peel, usaully small pieces of the bamboo leaves cut from the basket must added in .
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby jayinhk » Aug 28th, '13, 01:39

Sound good, I'll have to track some older peel down. I'm definitely in the right area for it!
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby Teaism » Aug 28th, '13, 02:26

If you are in Hong Kong, you can try Hoong Hum area. Might still have some in old medical hall.
Also remember to store the peel in sealed jar to preserve its flavour.
Hope you enjoy it.
BTW you can also put in one or two grain size of dried liquorice (kan chow)

Have a good day my friend.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby gingkoseto » Aug 28th, '13, 08:32

For Chinese language readers, two great liu bao books to read, 中国六堡茶 and 六堡大事典, by the same author 彭庆中 The second one is more expensive and an upgraded version of the first one. The first one is pretty good too and much more economic. Both can be found in taobao. One of the taobao agent of the second book (who has a logo of 三口居士 is also a liu bao seller that sells great liu bao tea (which also tastes clean...). But the second book is quite expensive and probably can be found with lower price in Malaysia.
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby BioHorn » Aug 28th, '13, 09:21

gingkoseto wrote:For Chinese language readers, two great liu bao books to read, 中国六堡茶 and 六堡大事典, by the same author 彭庆中 The second one is more expensive and an upgraded version of the first one. The first one is pretty good too and much more economic. Both can be found in taobao. One of the taobao agent of the second book (who has a logo of 三口居士 is also a liu bao seller that sells great liu bao tea (which also tastes clean...). But the second book is quite expensive and probably can be found with lower price in Malaysia.


It seems the seller mentioned (Six Fort Tea) has their Taobao shop here:

http://is.gd/gV2ScE

No promises this is correct. I do not read chinese!
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Re: Liu An/Liu Bao Cha

Postby jayinhk » Aug 28th, '13, 20:30

Teaism wrote:If you are in Hong Kong, you can try Hoong Hum area. Might still have some in old medical hall.
Also remember to store the peel in sealed jar to preserve its flavour.
Hope you enjoy it.
BTW you can also put in one or two grain size of dried liquorice (kan chow)

Have a good day my friend.


Thanks, but I don't think I'd have to go that far. :) I'm in the western district and I'm surrounded by stores that sell that kind of thing, including at least a dozen Chinese medicine practitioners!

I appreciate the suggestion for the dried licorice too...that sounds wonderful!
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