Smokiness in longjing


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Smokiness in longjing

Postby mageta » Dec 28th, '12, 17:26

I just got some longjing from teaspring and as I'm drinking it I notice a subtle smoky flavor in there. I've had this style of tea from adagio and another vendor before and have never noticed that characteristic. Is this due to the fact that this tea is pan fried?
User avatar
mageta
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Sep 27th, '

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby JRS22 » Dec 28th, '12, 22:21

I had the same problem with several different chinese greens from Teaspring a few years ago. I wasn't certain if the smoky flavor was supposed to be there, but I didn't like it. I'm curious to see other opinions.
User avatar
JRS22
 
Posts: 1099
Joined: Nov 7th, '0

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby Tead Off » Dec 28th, '12, 23:42

AFAIK, all Longqing teas are pan fried but I don't ever recall having smoked taste and flavor in them. This would be due to the processing of it not very carefully.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3552
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby mageta » Dec 29th, '12, 01:40

I don't find it offensive at all, I kind of like it. The dry leaves themselves don't really smell like it, but once they've been brewed the smell starts to come through and it's in the flavor as well.
User avatar
mageta
 
Posts: 38
Joined: Sep 27th, '

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby Tead Off » Dec 29th, '12, 23:16

mageta wrote:I don't find it offensive at all, I kind of like it. The dry leaves themselves don't really smell like it, but once they've been brewed the smell starts to come through and it's in the flavor as well.

Green teas are traditionally delicate and many people drink them for their fresh, vegetal taste, which varies by different regions. While smoke can give a pleasant flavor, it tends to obscure the actual flavor of the tea unless the smoky quality is sought as a result. In LQ teas, this is not the case. Too many delicate nuances can be hidden by smoke.

One green tea that I've encountered intentionally processes the tea to be smoky. It is a green tea from Laos. I can't say I enjoyed it very much but I've enjoyed some Puerh teas that had some smokiness to them.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3552
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby Chip » Dec 30th, '12, 02:20

Is it possible that the so called "smokiness" is more of a toastiness? Lowest grade of LJ from TeaSpring (and many other vendors' LJ offerings) are somewhat toasty either a result of not so great pan firing or because the tea lacks depth otherwise so they intentionally add a toasty note. As a result the leaves are often a more light brownish color versus the fresh green color.

Sure beats the "deer jerkey" LJ reported by Iannon a couple years ago. :mrgreen:
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22208
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby SilentChaos » Dec 30th, '12, 09:59

Chip wrote:Is it possible that the so called "smokiness" is more of a toastiness? Lowest grade of LJ from TeaSpring (and many other vendors' LJ offerings) are somewhat toasty either a result of not so great pan firing or because the tea lacks depth otherwise so they intentionally add a toasty note. As a result the leaves are often a more light brownish color versus the fresh green color.


SO FAR, I've found this to be true without exception. SO FAR.
User avatar
SilentChaos
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 426
Joined: Feb 2nd, '1
Location: Taipei

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby Chip » Dec 30th, '12, 12:36

... but I have also sampled excellent LJ from TeaSpring, beautiful production, leaves, taste and aroma.

And to be honest, their lowest grade's "toastiness" was not overwhelming nor bothersome to me. It was just something to expect from a really very decent "everyday LJ."

I do not like smoky green teas, this was not a smoky sensation. However I did not have 2012 harvest LJ from TeaSpring!
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22208
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby SilentChaos » Dec 30th, '12, 14:04

Ooops, my mistake, I didn't mean to say anything about teaspring. My comment was solely about lower grade longjings; that they tend to be pan fired heavier and exhibit more 'smokiness' or 'toastiness'.
User avatar
SilentChaos
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 426
Joined: Feb 2nd, '1
Location: Taipei

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby Chip » Dec 30th, '12, 14:24

SilentChaos wrote:Ooops, my mistake, I didn't mean to say anything about teaspring. My comment was solely about lower grade longjings; that they tend to be pan fired heavier and exhibit more 'smokiness' or 'toastiness'.

Yeah, I got that. :mrgreen:

The big question for me though ... is this toasty from the pan or smoky from the "fire?" There is a big difference in my mind.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22208
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Smokiness in longjing

Postby SilentChaos » Dec 30th, '12, 15:04

Hmmm...do you mean toasty from being in contact with a hot pan, or just from the heat but not necessarily the pan, or from being exposed to heat/smoke from an actual burning fire? I'm guessing these days it's probably from contact with an electric pan. :roll:
User avatar
SilentChaos
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 426
Joined: Feb 2nd, '1
Location: Taipei


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation