What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong

Ali Shan
2
8%
Li Shan
8
33%
Shan Lin Xi
3
13%
Qi Lai
1
4%
He Huan Shan
0
No votes
Da Yu Ling
5
21%
Long Feng Shia
0
No votes
Tian Fu
0
No votes
Cui Feng
1
4%
Other
4
17%
 
Total votes : 24

What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby bagua7 » Dec 31st, '12, 02:19

Let's see what are the Teachatters' preferences when it comes to Taiwanese alpine teas.

Please specify any other varieties not listed in the poll that you like better.

Enjoy!
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Dec 31st, '12, 11:37

I voted "Other" because I found my preferences were not based on geographical origin, but on age (I like aged ones) and cultivar (#12 and 17 are my favorite).
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Chip » Dec 31st, '12, 11:39

Other ... I like many, including Wenshan Baozhong.

I notice the omission of the enigmatic Dong Ding (or perhaps it is listed in a name I do not recognize)?
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby debunix » Dec 31st, '12, 15:51

I voted Ali Shan because I've had wonderful experiences with it, but the vote should come with an asterisk, because I've had quite a few lovely Ali Shans from Norbu, and have only tried the others once or twice (Da Yu Ling, Li Shan) or not at all (the rest).
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Dec 31st, '12, 16:24

Is Dong Ding a stricto sensu Gao Shan Cha?

Looking at a map, it is cultivated to the West of Shan Lin Xi, in what seems to be lower elevations and not located on the mountain range.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby wyardley » Dec 31st, '12, 16:50

brunogm wrote:Is Dong Ding a stricto sensu Gao Shan Cha?

Looking at a map, it is cultivated to the West of Shan Lin Xi, in what seems to be lower elevations and not located on the mountain range.

I believe there is some amount of dong ding grown at higher elevation, but I think you're also correct that most of it is grown at lower altitudes.

Personally, I don't have a strong preference for region among these (nor do I find the taste from a particular area quite as characteristic as some people) -- I'd rather have a good tea from any area / season, though I do tend to prefer things with a bit more oxidation and a bit fruitier taste.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby AdamMY » Dec 31st, '12, 17:16

wyardley wrote:
Personally, I don't have a strong preference for region among these (nor do I find the taste from a particular area quite as characteristic as some people) -- I'd rather have a good tea from any area / season, though I do tend to prefer things with a bit more oxidation and a bit fruitier taste.


+1 :mrgreen:
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Dec 31st, '12, 17:26

wyardley wrote: I'd rather have a good tea from any area / season, though I do tend to prefer things with a bit more oxidation and a bit fruitier taste.


It looks like we have similar tastes. Not geographically based.

Personally, I found two solutions, one expensive and one cheap.

Expensive/Oxydation = aged oolongs
------------------------------------------------
I suspect it is more about roasting than oxydation, but anyway, whether it is roast or oxydation, those teas look and taste less green.
An aged Alishan and an aged Dayuling are among my two favorite teas ever.
But given the price, I will not drink them every day.

Cheap/fruitier = Thailand
----------------------------------
I am finding the newer varietals like #12 (Jin Xuan) or #17 (Bai Lu) or even #13 (Cui Yu) are fruitier.
My solution is to buy them from Doi Mae Salong in Thailand. So it is not Taiwan but Thailand. But they are the same cultivars, absolutely great, and much cheaper than the Taiwanese grown ones.
Those are cheap enough that I have no qualms about drinking them every day.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Ambrose » Dec 31st, '12, 17:34

I enjoy all kinds of mountain teas, however more than others I tend to enjoy Lishan. :D
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby rhondabee » Dec 31st, '12, 18:11

Most of the time my favorite is Li Shan, and I buy it the most. However, it does depend on the current season. This spring I preferred a Shan Lin Xi, but I'm going to have to try this winter's Li Shan. I like Bao Zhong a lot, but I don't think is grown on high elevation land, so it is not considered high mountain oolong.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Baci15 » Dec 31st, '12, 18:28

Is Lao Cong Shan Cha a high mountain tea? Norbu calls it an "indigenous taiwan mountain tea" from yuchich township, nantou county. If it is, I'll put "other".

https://www.norbutea.com/LaoCongShanCha?category_id=60
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby bagua7 » Dec 31st, '12, 23:30

Chip wrote:I notice the omission of the enigmatic Dong Ding (or perhaps it is listed in a name I do not recognize)?


According to Tea Masters, Stéphane, that tea doesn't qualify as a high mountain one due to elevation issues, as already mentioned:

"That's probably why this is a Dong Ding oolong, located at just 700 meters below sea level. It's not a high mountain tea. They start around 1000 meters altitude."

Link.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Chip » Dec 31st, '12, 23:36

I believe Da Yu Ling is about to pop up on my list shortly! And perhaps other TCers! :wink:
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Tead Off » Jan 1st, '13, 00:36

brunogm wrote:
wyardley wrote: I'd rather have a good tea from any area / season, though I do tend to prefer things with a bit more oxidation and a bit fruitier taste.


It looks like we have similar tastes. Not geographically based.

Personally, I found two solutions, one expensive and one cheap.

Expensive/Oxydation = aged oolongs
------------------------------------------------
I suspect it is more about roasting than oxydation, but anyway, whether it is roast or oxydation, those teas look and taste less green.
An aged Alishan and an aged Dayuling are among my two favorite teas ever.
But given the price, I will not drink them every day.

Cheap/fruitier = Thailand
----------------------------------
I am finding the newer varietals like #12 (Jin Xuan) or #17 (Bai Lu) or even #13 (Cui Yu) are fruitier.
My solution is to buy them from Doi Mae Salong in Thailand. So it is not Taiwan but Thailand. But they are the same cultivars, absolutely great, and much cheaper than the Taiwanese grown ones.
Those are cheap enough that I have no qualms about drinking them every day.

For me, the best gao shan are not roasted but green. The fruitiness and aroma is all there in the leaf and the oxidation process will bring it forth. There is nothing wrong with the roasted teas, but like dancong teas, the best ones are not roasted or highly oxidized.

Unfortunately, I do not share your enthusiasm for Thai oolongs and I have never had one that I would compare to a good Taiwanese gao shan. It's true that the plants are Taiwanese cultivars but the soil, growing conditions, and even the processing are not going to match Taiwanese production. If you enjoy them, great. They are certainly cheaper.

I will be up in Mae Salong in 10 days and also crossing over to Takhilek in Burma to see if there is any Puerh being offered in the market.
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Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby ImmortaliTEA » Jan 1st, '13, 04:16

Tead Off wrote:
brunogm wrote:
wyardley wrote: I'd rather have a good tea from any area / season, though I do tend to prefer things with a bit more oxidation and a bit fruitier taste.


It looks like we have similar tastes. Not geographically based.

Personally, I found two solutions, one expensive and one cheap.

Expensive/Oxydation = aged oolongs
------------------------------------------------
I suspect it is more about roasting than oxydation, but anyway, whether it is roast or oxydation, those teas look and taste less green.
An aged Alishan and an aged Dayuling are among my two favorite teas ever.
But given the price, I will not drink them every day.

Cheap/fruitier = Thailand
----------------------------------
I am finding the newer varietals like #12 (Jin Xuan) or #17 (Bai Lu) or even #13 (Cui Yu) are fruitier.
My solution is to buy them from Doi Mae Salong in Thailand. So it is not Taiwan but Thailand. But they are the same cultivars, absolutely great, and much cheaper than the Taiwanese grown ones.
Those are cheap enough that I have no qualms about drinking them every day.

For me, the best gao shan are not roasted but green. The fruitiness and aroma is all there in the leaf and the oxidation process will bring it forth. There is nothing wrong with the roasted teas, but like dancong teas, the best ones are not roasted or highly oxidized.

Unfortunately, I do not share your enthusiasm for Thai oolongs and I have never had one that I would compare to a good Taiwanese gao shan. It's true that the plants are Taiwanese cultivars but the soil, growing conditions, and even the processing are not going to match Taiwanese production. If you enjoy them, great. They are certainly cheaper.

I will be up in Mae Salong in 10 days and also crossing over to Takhilek in Burma to see if there is any Puerh being offered in the market.


Wow there is much wisdom in those words. I have the exact same point-of-view towards BOTH Dan Chong & Gao Shan as you. I truly feel that the highest quality examples of both of these are always gonna be green light roast, light oxidation style (this is a common fact to those who specialize in Dan Chong oolongs specifically but has been especially obvious for me based on all of the examples of both categories I've tried over the years). There are few things more blissful in life than a 20% green-style Song Zhong Dan Chong (except maybe Shui Xian and 8582 lol but this is about Gao Shan oolong so that's neither here nor there). I could never choose just one type of lighter oolong that is my favorite overall but if I had to narrow it down I could bring it to a minimum of 4: Bao Zhong, Song Zhong (or any 20% Dan Chong), Bai Ji Guan (not sure if this is considered light because of oxidation but its certainly drastically lighter than all other Yan Cha so I personally consider it a light tea), and finally Da Yu Ling. For purposes of this vote as it is just out of Gao Shan teas and not all teas I instinctively (highest elevation) and intuitively (experiences with all other Gao Shan's) choose Da Yu Ling because I can't get enough of the stone fruit specifically!
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