What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong

Ali Shan
2
8%
Li Shan
8
33%
Shan Lin Xi
3
13%
Qi Lai
1
4%
He Huan Shan
0
No votes
Da Yu Ling
5
21%
Long Feng Shia
0
No votes
Tian Fu
0
No votes
Cui Feng
1
4%
Other
4
17%
 
Total votes : 24

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Jan 1st, '13, 05:31

Tead Off wrote:For me, the best gao shan are not roasted but green. The fruitiness and aroma is all there in the leaf and the oxidation process will bring it forth. There is nothing wrong with the roasted teas, but like dancong teas, the best ones are not roasted or highly oxidized.


I am a beginner, so the "roasting" is an assumption on my part. Those teas I am talking about are not roasted like yancha. They are green, but not as green as the very green ones. So maybe it is oxydation. I do not know. They have all the gamut of aroma and flavor. First few steeps taste vegetal, next ones floral, then the stone fruitiness shows up, usually around 4th or 5th steep, then around 9th steep it is yet another taste, maybe more woody.

I do not like very green gao shan cha and I was able to narrow down my dislike to the Chin Shin varietal, which unfortunately seems widespread.
Which means there are a lot of Taiwanese teas I will not like.
brunogm
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Dec 18th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby ethan » Jan 1st, '13, 14:49

brunogm, I've sampled several Thai teas from "cultivars" the same as some Taiwanese teas. For most, I disliked the heavy vegetal flavor, but unlike you never got into so many infusions to take the tea past that.
How are you preparing your tea? Ratio of tea to water etc.
Thanks.

My favorite tea is one of those Thai/Taiwan teas that was given a healthy, significant amount of oxidation. By favorite, I mean a tea that I drink daily (2 - 4 cups).
True Taiwanese tea that I have enjoyed the most is Spring lishan, & would be a favorite like lobster is to eat--not for regular use but indeed highly memorable etc.
ethan
 
Posts: 434
Joined: May 27th, '
Location: Boston, MA 2/3; Thailand 1/3

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby ImmortaliTEA » Jan 1st, '13, 16:59

brunogm wrote:
Tead Off wrote:For me, the best gao shan are not roasted but green. The fruitiness and aroma is all there in the leaf and the oxidation process will bring it forth. There is nothing wrong with the roasted teas, but like dancong teas, the best ones are not roasted or highly oxidized.


I am a beginner, so the "roasting" is an assumption on my part. Those teas I am talking about are not roasted like yancha. They are green, but not as green as the very green ones. So maybe it is oxydation. I do not know. They have all the gamut of aroma and flavor. First few steeps taste vegetal, next ones floral, then the stone fruitiness shows up, usually around 4th or 5th steep, then around 9th steep it is yet another taste, maybe more woody.

I do not like very green gao shan cha and I was able to narrow down my dislike to the Chin Shin varietal, which unfortunately seems widespread.
Which means there are a lot of Taiwanese teas I will not like.


Please tell me what your brewing parameters would be if you were to brew a green style Gao Shan? (brewing vessel type & size, amount of dry leaf, type of water, temperature of water, and infusion time). If you can give me all of this info I can understand a little more about how your tea is possibly coming out based on how YOU brew so I would greatly appreciate this information.
User avatar
ImmortaliTEA
 
Posts: 227
Joined: Apr 12th, '
Location: Sunrise, FL

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby wyardley » Jan 1st, '13, 20:14

Just to be clear, I wasn't talking about heavily oxidized Taiwanese high mountain teas. I'm just talking about tea that has a slightly higher level of oxidation relative to the most vegetal examples of the genre. It may still not create a visible "red edge", but it's perceptible in the taste and aroma of the tea.

I still prefer gaoshan teas that are just shy of neon green, and that's one reason why I often actually prefer the tea from seasons when the weather / harvest isn't quite as good, because it seems like those are the seasons when farmers will oxidize the leaf a little more. While I appreciate that there are some objective measures of good tea, the "best" tea for me is the one which tastes best to me.
User avatar
wyardley
 
Posts: 1921
Joined: Jan 11th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Tead Off » Jan 1st, '13, 22:38

wyardley wrote:Just to be clear, I wasn't talking about heavily oxidized Taiwanese high mountain teas. I'm just talking about tea that has a slightly higher level of oxidation relative to the most vegetal examples of the genre. It may still not create a visible "red edge", but it's perceptible in the taste and aroma of the tea.

I still prefer gaoshan teas that are just shy of neon green, and that's one reason why I often actually prefer the tea from seasons when the weather / harvest isn't quite as good, because it seems like those are the seasons when farmers will oxidize the leaf a little more. While I appreciate that there are some objective measures of good tea, the "best" tea for me is the one which tastes best to me.

I've often tried to compare the spring and winter harvests of the same tea. I have asked Taiwanese tea people which one is the best? I have gotten different replies. Sometimes I think winter is better but then I move onto a spring, and I also fall in love. They both probably have their own merits and a lot depends on the weather.

I also favor slightly oxidized gaoshan but have had some lovely higher oxidized teas, too. It probably depends in whose hands the tea is put through its processing. I'm not a great fan of roasted teas in general but there are exceptions.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3372
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby debunix » Jan 1st, '13, 23:03

there's definitely a seasonal difference, and I like both the spring and the winter versions of Ali Shan. Winter is mellower, warmer, a little richer; spring is more delicate, more floral, and a little more tempermental.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 4978
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Jan 2nd, '13, 05:15

ethan wrote: I've sampled several Thai teas from "cultivars" the same as some Taiwanese teas. For most, I disliked the heavy vegetal flavor, but unlike you never got into so many infusions to take the tea past that.
How are you preparing your tea? Ratio of tea to water etc.


Ethan,

My message was not clear, because the teas I was describing were the "not too green" gao shan cha, not the Thai oolongs. With these gao shan cha, I get up to 14 cups I like. I could probably get more, but I never tried, because after 14 cups I am so filled with tea I cannot drink any more without exploding.

With the Thai oolongs I get about 10 cups I like, so less cups than the gao shan, and the separation in flavor between steeps is not as clearly marked. I gather this indicates that as Tead Off said, the Thai tea are not as high quality as my gao shan.
The difference is that the Thai teas are about 10 €/100 gram, so I am finding them great value for money, "every day" teas.
The gao shan are more than 100 €/100 grams, so they are not for every day.
In my mind, these are too different niches, one for the occasionnal threat, the other for every day drinking.

I do not know what is this heavy vegetal flavor you are referring to. Maybe it is this particular taste I found also in Japanese tea. I decrease it by adjusting brewing parameters.

My brewing parameters vary from tea to tea.
For those Thai teas, my optimum was around 5 grams in 120 ml, starting at 90°C, with steeps increasing progressively from 30 seconds to 1 minute.
So I guess I am under packing gaiwan and under brewing those teas, by most standards.
brunogm
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Dec 18th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Jan 2nd, '13, 05:28

ImmortaliTEA wrote:Please tell me what your brewing parameters would be if you were to brew a green style Gao Shan? (brewing vessel type & size, amount of dry leaf, type of water, temperature of water, and infusion time). If you can give me all of this info I can understand a little more about how your tea is possibly coming out based on how YOU brew so I would greatly appreciate this information.


When I test teas I always use the same brewing parameters the first time. In the case of the gao shan I did not like, I did not try other parameter variations, because I decided it was not worth it since I disliked the teas.

My standard testing parameters:

- 120 ml gaiwan (always the same gaiwan for all teas)
- Volvic water
- 5 grams of leaf
- water starts at 95°C
- steeps start at 30 seconds and each successive steep increases 10 seconds.

This is for the first test, because afterwards, I tend to increase tea/water ratio and use smaller vessels. My personal preference is in the area of 8 grams / 100 ml, and Volvic water (for oolongs).
brunogm
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Dec 18th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby etorix » Jan 3rd, '13, 16:07

Thai teas from Taiwan "cultivars" : is there a source for these?

im still exploring Taiwan teas from various sources, but i cant see where to get the Thai versions easily, to sample
User avatar
etorix
 
Posts: 202
Joined: Feb 16th, '
Location: London England

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby brunogm » Jan 3rd, '13, 19:10

etorix wrote:Thai teas from Taiwan "cultivars" : is there a source for these?

im still exploring Taiwan teas from various sources, but i cant see where to get the Thai versions easily, to sample


Thai teas are out of topic, but this is my fault, I should not have talked about them. I should have started a different topic called Thai teas.
My apologies to all for hijacking the thread.

I do not buy them from the internet, but here is what I found:
http://siam-tee.de/
I think I will try their teas, never done it though.

It looks like they sell only teas from Doi Mae Salong, but my favorite one is a Jin Xuan from "Royal Project", which I could not find on the internet.
If you find some, I am interested in the link.
brunogm
 
Posts: 39
Joined: Dec 18th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby ethan » Jan 4th, '13, 18:03

etorix,
Upton tea & a few other vendors have a couple of thai teas, but the thai teas are overpriced & the descriptions of the tea are way off (IMHO). I am in thailand now hoping to return w/ a broad range of tea. (I drink the only one that I liked everyday, but I think I should be able to find more than one.) PM me in March if you haven't had success w/ finding samples.
ethan
 
Posts: 434
Joined: May 27th, '
Location: Boston, MA 2/3; Thailand 1/3

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby wyardley » Jan 4th, '13, 18:32

I think the simplest way to get the stuff from Thailand is to buy cheap gaoshan tea "from Taiwan".
User avatar
wyardley
 
Posts: 1921
Joined: Jan 11th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby Oni » Jan 8th, '13, 07:05

Actually Da Yu Ling is a Li Shan tea, it is rare and grown high, I bought this year from t oolong, one veteran farm and one 105k. I
I also tried Houde`s Da yu lings. I think taiwanese oolong a whole category of oolongs, they have a certain style, modern high mountain oolongs resemble green teas, they are very lightly oxidized.
I think Li SHan and Shan lin Xi are my favourites, Da Yu Ling and Long Feng Xia.
User avatar
Oni
 
Posts: 1139
Joined: Nov 28th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby jayinhk » Jan 9th, '13, 10:39

SIlentChaos on this board is based in TW and brought me a nice number of samples of TW gaoshan when he visited HK, as well as some aged oolong. Drinking some good aged DongDing right now and it is very calming.

I haven't tried tea from all of the high mountain villages yet, but the spring SLX I tried this year knocked my socks off. I've never experienced such a wide range of flavors in any other tea.
User avatar
jayinhk
 
Posts: 875
Joined: Aug 28th, '

Re: What is your favourite Taiwan High Mountain Oolong?

Postby ethan » Jan 9th, '13, 19:15

"Spring SLX" ? lost me
ethan
 
Posts: 434
Joined: May 27th, '
Location: Boston, MA 2/3; Thailand 1/3

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation