Differences


Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.

Differences

Postby drone1952 » Feb 18th, '13, 17:02

The first question a beginner:
Can you tell me if there are differences between black Russian tea and black Chinese tea?
Thanks
George
drone1952
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 18th, '

Re: Differences

Postby Chip » Feb 18th, '13, 20:15

First off, welcome to TeaChat.

There are many many forms of Chinese Black tea from many different regions of China.

Russian (Caravan) tea is usually some form of smokey black that has some historisity linked to it, though likely not much real application today. Often the tea had a smokey character.

Today it is usually blended with black teas from other tea growing countries. Looking at a google search would certainly add to the confusion about Russian Caravan.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22091
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Differences

Postby Evan Draper » Feb 18th, '13, 20:39

A more generous interpretation of George's question might be, how do the cultivars of tea grown in the former Soviet republics differ from those of Chinese red tea? But I don't know the answer....
User avatar
Evan Draper
 
Posts: 339
Joined: Jan 23rd, '
Location: Philadelphia

Re: Differences

Postby gingkoseto » Feb 18th, '13, 21:40

In terms of brewing method and forms of tea, there is little commonness between Russian black tea and Chinese black tea.
Russia black tea used to be mostly imported from China. But nowadays the largest export countries to Russia are Sri Lanka, India and Kenya. So in terms of tea cultivars and taste profiles, maybe it can be a comparison between Ceylon and Chinese black teas?
User avatar
gingkoseto
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24th, '
Location: Boston, MA

Re: Differences

Postby Teaism » Feb 19th, '13, 00:21

Chip wrote:First off, welcome to TeaChat.


Russian (Caravan) tea is usually some form of smokey black that has some historisity linked to it, though likely not much real application today. Often the tea had a smokey character.

.



In the past, the smoky black tea in Russia is from Wuyi call Lapsang Sauchong. I have a Russian friend who is really crazy over this tea. Some times we butter-trade this tea with the lovely Russian wild honey. The name Lapsang Sauchong is from Chinese word of Chen Shan Xiao Chong literally translated meaning as Real Mountain Small Type ( Small Type refer to the tippy leaf). The smokiness comes from burning of the native pine tree leaves to dry the tea leaves. It was discovered by accident, just like the botrytis wine, when the soldier came to celebrate victory, the tea leaves are dried in a hurry by burning pine leaves, and the rest is history. This tea is rare now as the base is use for producing the Jin Ju Mei tea which cost thousands per kilo. Lapsang Sauchong is a great tea for smoking food too, some great cold smoked duck is smoked with this tea.

The are some other good black tea in China like Qi Men Hei Cha ( Kumming Black Tea). Most black can be aged beautifully if kept in airtight canister.

Cheers!
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 646
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: Differences

Postby drone1952 » Feb 19th, '13, 04:24

Thank you all.
All started 30 years ago when I bought Kakuzo Okakura's book "The Book of Tea", at that time Romania was communist. At that time in country were only Russian and Chinezesti tea. The reasons why I started my posts with this question.
My posts will attempt to clarify Questions that I did not have answers.

George
drone1952
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 18th, '

Re: Differences

Postby ethan » Feb 19th, '13, 06:47

teaism, I never encountered the term "butter-trade" before. Means?

(I'll also look it up, but I am guessing it is an unique teaswap term.)
ethan
 
Posts: 433
Joined: May 27th, '
Location: Boston, MA 2/3; Thailand 1/3

Re: Differences

Postby Chip » Feb 19th, '13, 10:27

Come to think of it, I received a sample of Georgian (sp?) tea 4ish years ago ... I had a weird feeling about it and never tried it. 8) In fact, I still have it. I received it in a sample tin that was taped shut, I never even broke the seal! :?
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22091
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Differences

Postby Teaism » Feb 19th, '13, 10:44

ethan wrote:teaism, I never encountered the term "butter-trade" before. Means?

(I'll also look it up, but I am guessing it is an unique teaswap term.)

Hi Ethan,

I am not sure the origin of this term but it is widely use in Asia. It means exchanging one item with another item without monetary transaction between parties. In my earlier post context, I exchange my Lapsang Sauchong with my friend's Russian wild honey.

Cheers!
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 646
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: Differences

Postby drone1952 » Feb 21st, '13, 08:01

For the moment my favorite is Darjeeling tea. Certainly not say no to a Ceylon tea.
My little collection of tea but do not know how to post.
Attachments
phpECXJ3rAM.jpg
phpECXJ3rAM.jpg (27.34 KiB) Viewed 2167 times
phpMiBUDXAM.jpg
phpMiBUDXAM.jpg (28.97 KiB) Viewed 2167 times
phpZUdgwSAM.jpg
phpZUdgwSAM.jpg (36.07 KiB) Viewed 2167 times
drone1952
 
Posts: 4
Joined: Feb 18th, '

Re: Differences

Postby SlientSipper » Feb 26th, '13, 07:55

I always say, try them out for yourself to best understand.

but, the responses here seem to cover it well.
User avatar
SlientSipper
 
Posts: 322
Joined: Nov 21st, '


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation