Storing with charcoal


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Storing with charcoal

Postby lordsbm » Mar 4th, '13, 21:17

I'm from Singapore, so mold is likely the worst problem of storing pu erh for me. I only have 1 pu erh kept untouched from 2005 in a dark cupboard with a plastic bag over. I don't know how much it changed, but some small parts has white mold.

I'm thinking of just using those sling pu erh bag they are selling in China that can hold a tong. Lay a layer of charcoal on the bottom with a cardboard to cover it, then stack the tong above.

Is it wise to use charcoal? Or should I just use those disposable dehumidifier tubs? The problem is those tubs normally takes up more space and suck out the moisture and stored the water in the tub which I'm not that comfortable with. :roll:
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby Tead Off » Mar 5th, '13, 00:13

lordsbm wrote:I'm from Singapore, so mold is likely the worst problem of storing pu erh for me. I only have 1 pu erh kept untouched from 2005 in a dark cupboard with a plastic bag over. I don't know how much it changed, but some small parts has white mold.

I'm thinking of just using those sling pu erh bag they are selling in China that can hold a tong. Lay a layer of charcoal on the bottom with a cardboard to cover it, then stack the tong above.

Is it wise to use charcoal? Or should I just use those disposable dehumidifier tubs? The problem is those tubs normally takes up more space and suck out the moisture and stored the water in the tub which I'm not that comfortable with. :roll:

Charcoal is said to absorb smells. You would want to store your tea away from any strong smells in any case. Would you really need charcoal in your box absorbing the smell of the tea? I would think oxygen absorbers and dessicants would be preferable to keep moisture at a manageable level.

Since you are in Singapore, why not try the method suggested by Teaism who is also in Singapore and reports excellent results with.
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby lordsbm » Mar 5th, '13, 01:19

Tead Off wrote:Charcoal is said to absorb smells. You would want to store your tea away from any strong smells in any case. Would you really need charcoal in your box absorbing the smell of the tea? I would think oxygen absorbers and dessicants would be preferable to keep moisture at a manageable level.

Since you are in Singapore, why not try the method suggested by Teaism who is also in Singapore and reports excellent results with.


Thanks for the reply. I never considered the "odor" absorber property of charcoal. Thanks :D

May I know which thread Teasim method is in? I don't recall coming across it^^;

I do know some in Singapore store in cardboard and envelopes near an open window. But due to my apartment limited space, I have problem finding such an unoccupied area in my home. The room I intend to store is much more humid for some reason.
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby Tead Off » Mar 5th, '13, 02:06

You can pick up the discussion here, viewtopic.php?f=20&t=18208&start=75
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby lordsbm » Mar 5th, '13, 02:34

Tead Off wrote:You can pick up the discussion here, viewtopic.php?f=20&t=18208&start=75


Thanks a lot :) Maybe I'll try sealing it or even vacuum seal, as the one I kept from 2005 did had some mold despite being kept in a food grade plastic bag.
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby Bad Jedi » Mar 5th, '13, 03:06

Tead Off wrote:
lordsbm wrote:I'm from Singapore, so mold is likely the worst problem of storing pu erh for me. I only have 1 pu erh kept untouched from 2005 in a dark cupboard with a plastic bag over. I don't know how much it changed, but some small parts has white mold.

I'm thinking of just using those sling pu erh bag they are selling in China that can hold a tong. Lay a layer of charcoal on the bottom with a cardboard to cover it, then stack the tong above.

Is it wise to use charcoal? Or should I just use those disposable dehumidifier tubs? The problem is those tubs normally takes up more space and suck out the moisture and stored the water in the tub which I'm not that comfortable with. :roll:

Charcoal is said to absorb smells. You would want to store your tea away from any strong smells in any case. Would you really need charcoal in your box absorbing the smell of the tea? I would think oxygen absorbers and dessicants would be preferable to keep moisture at a manageable level.

Since you are in Singapore, why not try the method suggested by Teaism who is also in Singapore and reports excellent results with.


I'm just wondering how Oxygen absorbers will help the guy with moisture management ?
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Re: Storing with charcoal

Postby Tead Off » Mar 5th, '13, 04:18

Bad Jedi wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
lordsbm wrote:I'm from Singapore, so mold is likely the worst problem of storing pu erh for me. I only have 1 pu erh kept untouched from 2005 in a dark cupboard with a plastic bag over. I don't know how much it changed, but some small parts has white mold.

I'm thinking of just using those sling pu erh bag they are selling in China that can hold a tong. Lay a layer of charcoal on the bottom with a cardboard to cover it, then stack the tong above.

Is it wise to use charcoal? Or should I just use those disposable dehumidifier tubs? The problem is those tubs normally takes up more space and suck out the moisture and stored the water in the tub which I'm not that comfortable with. :roll:

Charcoal is said to absorb smells. You would want to store your tea away from any strong smells in any case. Would you really need charcoal in your box absorbing the smell of the tea? I would think oxygen absorbers and dessicants would be preferable to keep moisture at a manageable level.

Since you are in Singapore, why not try the method suggested by Teaism who is also in Singapore and reports excellent results with.


I'm just wondering how Oxygen absorbers will help the guy with moisture management ?

The dessicants do that, not the oxy absorbers. Ideally, you would need both depending on your climate and storage condition. Then again, you could always rely on luck and not do anything.
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