The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic


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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby paul haigh » Mar 5th, '13, 12:05

I recently read an article about substituting silicon carbide for silica (not 1:1) in glaze recipes in order to get a very localized (in the glaze only) reduction effect for copper. Very interesting idea for electric firing, though I wouldn't guess that it's super consistent and would need specific firing schedules. That's also not helpful for shinos, which are unlikely to contain silica as a raw ingredient.

Never mind... just tawkin...
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby biglou13 » Mar 6th, '13, 12:30

Is there a way to dumb down house/studio's clear glaze. Aka add something to it. It is sometime too shiny.

In a formal sense. is there a rule for foot proportion (primarily Chawan) to size of bowl. I've had a few slump a little at cone 6 around a small foot? I've seen small foot/kodai on high fired pot and no slump. (Granted rules are meant to be pushed and broken)

I was toying with emulating carbon trapping with the limitations of electric/reduction/cone 6/7. I had some carbon burn through glaze. I think the spotting is beautiful. I understand its technically a flaw.
What's your opinion?
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby JBaymore » Mar 10th, '13, 14:57

Paul,

It works. You have to make sure to use ultra-fine silicon carbide...... (400-600 mesh) otherwise you tend to re-invent the Natzler's "crater glazes" :lol: .

best,

.................john
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby JBaymore » Mar 10th, '13, 15:03

biglou13 wrote:Is there a way to dumb down house/studio's clear glaze. Aka add something to it. It is sometime too shiny.


Biglou,

Ther are lots of ways to do it "right".....but they involve uinderstanding glaze chemistry. "Quick and dirty" (and not necessarily the way you would want to do it).... increase the clay content of the recipe slightly (EPK, kaolin, ball clay, etc.)... the added alumina and silica will raise the melting point of the glaze....so it will then be slightly underfired at the cone you are firing to. Another is simply add flint....the added silica will do the same thing to the coner range. The QUALITIES of the glaze by doing this may not be what you want though...and no guarantees on the stability of the glaze to hold colorants and resist chemical attack.

biglou13 wrote:In a formal sense. is there a rule for foot proportion (primarily Chawan) to size of bowl.


Personally... I think this is stuff to ask your hands-on teacher there.

best,

...............john
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby paul haigh » Mar 12th, '13, 09:37

I agree with John on that- if you're making functional ware then you probably want a nice stable glaze. Personally, I might take some 400 grit wet/dry sandpaper to it to take the shine down a notch unless you can find a tested glaze.
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First class under my belt

Postby FiveStar » Mar 12th, '13, 11:55

Had my first beginning wheel class last night. TONS of fun! My teacher was extremely impressed with my centering. She asked if I'd ever done it before, and I told her the truth: I'd simply watched a ton of youtube vids of throwing :lol: .

Had a great time, learned some basic wedging, thre 3 nice cylinders, 2 of which my bottom was too thin. So I either cut through with the wire, or the form just came off in my hand. But I did manage to make a nice cylindrical tumbler! A bit short, but not too much clay in the bottom. I'm going to take advantage of a couple of hours of open studio on Sunday before class again on Monday.

I can see where this could get really addictive. The takeaway message from the first class was MINDFULLNESS too the fullest at all times. When I rushed, or got excited in any way while touching the clay, or if the wheel was moving too fast, bad things happened. Pretty much once I threw a cup and wired it off, I got so excited that everything after that sucked. But while I took things slow, life was good.

Will show pics if I can take any with muddy hands...
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby paul haigh » Mar 12th, '13, 13:00

That is the beginning of the end, 5star!
You can check the depth of the clay on the bottom with a needle tool- make the bottom a bit thick, check with the tool, thin a bit... if you want to learn trimming then you need to leave a little extra.

You will start developing muscle memory and your form will start to become more natural- just like all the little things you no longer think about when driving a car.

Please post pics!
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby biglou13 » Mar 13th, '13, 20:21

5 star after your hooked. Some one here will,give a list of places and times for the rehab meetings.....

Paul teach at studio modified a glaze I'm making by increasing. Epk. Ty

Ive made many chawan And each one i learn something new. I will never stop My practice. making other forms gives me insight and experience . What other tea wares other than Chawan gunomi, yunomi or other pottery (not tea related) for that matters are any of you making?
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby AdamMY » Mar 13th, '13, 21:37

To the members just getting into Pottery, when you start having finished pieces please feel free to post in this thread: http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=36&t=17444

I could use some company! I am currently enrolled in my Second Ceramics class, I sort of jumped to the big one rather hurriedly, it is my local Institute of Arts Anagama Class, in which I will get to help with the wood firing ( I need to work 2 or 3, six hour shifts.

But because that kiln is only fired once, it will be one big firing in early may!
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Re: First class under my belt

Postby GreenwoodStudio » Mar 13th, '13, 22:24

FiveStar wrote: I'm going to take advantage of a couple of hours of open studio on Sunday before class again on Monday

Great idea!

Glad your enjoying your class!
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby FiveStar » Mar 19th, '13, 12:49

Not sure what they are putting in the clay at this studio, but I cannot stop wanting to go back. I've made some serious doorstops, but I've actually managed to make a couple of nice cups, yunomi, and guinomi. I already spent half my "Free Studio" time this past sunday, and got some 1 on 1 time with the resident artist whose aesthetic fits mine. She had me throw off the mound, and THAT was reeeeeally fun. So yesterday during class, she gave a kick-wheel demo and threw me up on there. I think I'm a Kick-wheel convert. Much slower pace, but I didn't have any more trouble centering than with an electric wheel.

I also managed to trim right through the bottom of a cup too! Humbling.

Anyone know where I can get a used kick wheel on the cheap in the North Carolina area? :D
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby biglou13 » Mar 19th, '13, 21:51

Its great your enjoying class's.

I find my cups and bows are better with a slow wheel.

Have someone there show you how to pinch. I recently got the technique down. No wheel necessary. I feel like it opened a new world for me. It feeds the need....I also thinking enhances your wheel work.

I've also been playing with coil/ pinch then finish on banding wheel. Ala shiho kanzaki. (See you tube)

As soon as started hand building I was graced with a free electric wheel. Ala Craig list. So Craig's list /search tempest is your friend.

It took me awhile to understand trimming. Until recent aha moment thanks to teacher. And i still ocassionally trim through.... No worries make more...
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby paul haigh » Mar 20th, '13, 08:27

FiveStar wrote:Not sure what they are putting in the clay at this studio, but I cannot stop wanting to go back. I've made some serious doorstops, but I've actually managed to make a couple of nice cups, yunomi, and guinomi. I already spent half my "Free Studio" time this past sunday, and got some 1 on 1 time with the resident artist whose aesthetic fits mine. She had me throw off the mound, and THAT was reeeeeally fun. So yesterday during class, she gave a kick-wheel demo and threw me up on there. I think I'm a Kick-wheel convert. Much slower pace, but I didn't have any more trouble centering than with an electric wheel.

I also managed to trim right through the bottom of a cup too! Humbling.

Anyone know where I can get a used kick wheel on the cheap in the North Carolina area? :D


Craigslist will have kickwheels come up occasionally. You might also consider joining a local clay group- NC is filthy with potters. One club of note is John Britt's ( http://ncclayclub.blogspot.com/). Groups like that will have their own classifieds, opportunities, etc. I am the editor for our local potter's guild's newsletter, and we have had a few kickwheels up for sale/ free in the past year.
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Weight of clay

Postby biglou13 » Mar 26th, '13, 16:30

For those that do not throw off the hump, what weight of clay do you use, for formal matcha Chawan, and/or other tea ware items.

I'm practicing, for now , on more precise and repetitive forms? Especially trying to learn to impart that "balance"

I recently held a "real" Japanese Chawan in with box/tomobako, ukon-nuno/ tumeric colored cloth, certificate, owner doesn't recall potters name. It was amazing to see and even more so to handle. Amongst its MANY aesthetically pleasing values, I was impressed with its "balance", way it felt in my hands, the weight, the balance of its parts..... Whch one can not understand/experience from pictures. This quality is lacking in my Practice. It was very humbling, and very educational experience.

I will take pictures next time I'm privileged to hold it.
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Re: Weight of clay

Postby JBaymore » Mar 26th, '13, 18:05

biglou13 wrote:For those that do not throw off the hump, what weight of clay do you use, for formal matcha Chawan, and/or other tea ware items.


Hi biglou. I teach courses on making chadogu (teawares).

While there are exceptions to every rule that a chajin (tea person) can break, the sort of "target" weight for a good stoneware chawan (at about 13 cm dia. and 9 cm h, fired) is about 454 grams (1 pound), finished fired. So the wet forming weight can allow for the trimming of the kodai (foot) and the drying of the water of formation out of the piece...... plus adding in the addition of the weight of any slips and glazes and firing chemical changes. Once you get over about 550 g in that size, they start to feel "too heavy". (A lot of western potters chawan are too heavy. Look nice....but heavy.)

Some Ido style chawan weigh in at only about half that..... and true (Japanese) raku wares and porcelains are typically a bit lighter than stoneware ones.

You hit the nail on the head on the "balance" issue! Perceptive. THAT is as important or likely more so than the total raw weight. To be a little technical here, the center of mass of the bowl needs to be located somewhere in the physical center of the volume occupied by the form. When you move it, it balances about its spacial center.

Attention to the forming of a chawan for actual Chanoyu use is intense...and few "make it". I've been a potter for over 40 years and I get about a 10-20% success rate for saleable ones.

Welcome to the world of clay. Keep working.

best,

..................john
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