Different pot's for different ages?


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby shah82 » Mar 31st, '13, 01:31

/me looks at his gaiwan with fondness.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby gingkoseto » Mar 31st, '13, 09:58

The yixing I use today, I've used it for some dancong, some yancha, some young sheng, some old sheng and once or twice for black tea, all depending on if I feel like to put a tea in it. I do restrict shu to one or two pots. But occasionally I let shu "soil" another pot, and just let it go through "hot showers" more thoroughly afterwards.
I have probably 60 pairs of shoes, wear fewer than 10 pairs of them frequently, and spend the rest of the time feeling guilty for consumerism. I do the same for teapots :mrgreen:
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby theredbaron » Mar 31st, '13, 11:03

gasninja wrote:Do you really wanna drink your dry stored aged tea out of the same pot as wet stored? Also teas with a strong camphor taste .
Seven pots is definitely over kill. But the spectrum of flavors is allot more broad than with a type of oolong. I should have said as many as seven pots could be used to appreciate the full spectrum of sheng puerh. but seven are hardly necessary.



I can't drink wet stored Pu Erh - i find the taste and smell offensive. But yes, if i would drink it i would definitely designate its own pot for it, or use one of my all around pots. Those all around pots i also use for young Sheng, as i just test young Sheng, but wait 10 years or more before drinking it.
I also hardly ever drink Shu.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby Teaism » Mar 31st, '13, 11:12

theredbaron wrote:
gasninja wrote:Do you really wanna drink your dry stored aged tea out of the same pot as wet stored? Also teas with a strong camphor taste .
Seven pots is definitely over kill. But the spectrum of flavors is allot more broad than with a type of oolong. I should have said as many as seven pots could be used to appreciate the full spectrum of sheng puerh. but seven are hardly necessary.



I can't drink wet stored Pu Erh - i find the taste and smell offensive. But yes, if i would drink it i would definitely designate its own pot for it, or use one of my all around pots. Those all around pots i also use for young Sheng, as i just test young Sheng, but wait 10 years or more before drinking it.
I also hardly ever drink Shu.


+1. Wet storage shu is also a tea to avoid for me. The taste and smell is really offensive and I suspect it is not healthy too. The dark brown brooth and the smell of most shu really gave me goose bump. Likewise for wet storage sheng... yucks for me.

Dry storage aged sheng is definately what I like. I have some old shu, but they are a mixture of sheng and shu as the piling is very light. Some older guest prefer those. The brooth of the half sheng/shu is still as orangy and "clean" with nice tea flavour.

For tea pot, I usually assign based on type of tea, e,g one pot for TKY, etc. and for Puer, one for old and one for new. Most pot I use is from 70s to 80s Yixing.

Cheers!
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby futurebird » Mar 31st, '13, 12:09

Is "Hong Kong storage" essentially the same as wet?

I tend to really like such teas. Like this one:

http://www.sampletea.com/product/1980s- ... cake-green

if you have anything like this that you don't want.... oh I'll be very happy to relieve you of those problem teas.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby JakubT » Mar 31st, '13, 13:03

futurebird wrote:Is "Hong Kong storage" essentially the same as wet?

I tend to really like such teas. Like this one:

http://www.sampletea.com/product/1980s- ... cake-green

if you have anything like this that you don't want.... oh I'll be very happy to relieve you of those problem teas.


No, HK storage does not have to be wet at all. Their dry storage is one of very good ways of storage too, I think.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby Teaism » Mar 31st, '13, 13:17

Yes the last few years I travelled to HK and visited a lot of tea houses and friends, the trend is for dry storage. They are dumping their wet storage tea to Malaysia and many in Malaysia is still enjoy the camphor taste.

To me a good Puer is aged dry stored sheng which is flavorful, clean and clear golden broth and last many brews with complex aroma and flavours that linger in the taste bud even after many hours from the last cup.

The woody, brown and camphor shu or wet storage sheng is really not my cup of tea. And I really don't buy or keep any of these tea.
But like they say, it is all up to our personal taste.

Cheers!
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby davelcorp » Mar 31st, '13, 14:58

I don't like young sheng all that much, so I don't drink it very often. When I do, it is to "test" it, so I just use a gaiwan.

For aged sheng, I have a few pots of various sizes that I use depending on the size of leaves, size of sample, and the number of people drinking. I don't drink a lot of heavily wet-stored (in the sense of forced humidity) nor do I like sheng that is stored too dry. Anything from the extremes of the storage spectrum also goes in a gaiwan.

I have one Shu pot. I guess I could also throw the occasional wet-stored sheng into it.

Altogether I have 4 pots for puer (3 for sheng and 1 for Shu).

I also have 2 for aged and heavy roasted oolongs.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby wyardley » Mar 31st, '13, 16:55

JakubT wrote:No, HK storage does not have to be wet at all. Their dry storage is one of very good ways of storage too, I think.

When people say "HK storage", though (i.e., gangshi) they're referring to traditional (i.e., somewhat wet) storage.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby JakubT » Mar 31st, '13, 17:34

wyardley wrote:
JakubT wrote:No, HK storage does not have to be wet at all. Their dry storage is one of very good ways of storage too, I think.

When people say "HK storage", though (i.e., gangshi) they're referring to traditional (i.e., somewhat wet) storage.


That may be so, I just wanted to point out that there is tea from HK that is not wet stored.

I even think that most tea is not wet stored there (like with deliberately added humidity).
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby gasninja » Apr 1st, '13, 10:45

futurebird wrote:Is "Hong Kong storage" essentially the same as wet?

I tend to really like such teas.
if you have anything like this that you don't want.... oh I'll be very happy to relieve you of those problem teas.



+1
don't get me wrong I love dry storage as well. But some teas need humidity to make them age perfectly. See how much a tai bing changes in fifteen years with no humidity.
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Re: Different pot's for different ages?

Postby Emmett » Apr 6th, '13, 02:10

I was not able to drink any aged teas that had the wet storage taste until I tried them in a very dark porous yixing pot that I was using for shu. Now I can really enjoy them as the pot removes much of the early wet storage taste and I am left with many great flavors from the tea.
I just bought a small purion to try as I have read that it also smooths out the rough flavors of some aged teas.

I use medium porous yixing for all the young and dry stored sheng to bring out the youthfull flavors. Also for wuyi teas.

A really high fired yixing for light teas like dan cong so you get full flavor.

Every pot that I own gives a different flavor to the same tea.
I have experimented with all of them and found which I like best for each type of tea.
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