Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby JBaymore » Apr 23rd, '13, 10:45

For the lip.... if the body is still wet enouigh, add a coil of clay and form it into the thickened flange.

Do you have a banding wheel yet? (A kitchen lazy susan can double for this.)

best,

................john
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » Apr 23rd, '13, 11:32

that worked like a charm... one nice thing bout this clay is it "glues" well. score slip and smooth and it seems too not mind.

Oh and I *do* have a banding wheel it came with the ox horn.
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby debunix » Apr 23rd, '13, 11:45

futurebird wrote:Here are some more photos after a lot of carving on the spout....
also I did not plan well for the lid. Maybe I can add a lip. Ideas?


I'd say thank you to this one for helping to teach you to remember to make a seat for the lid, and squish it and reclaim the clay. They're getting better fast, but still, I'd not plan on keeping any yet, because you're still on the steep part of the learning curve, and you've learned what you can from making this one. It won't be long before they'll start being potential keepers, and then you'll have the trouble of deciding which ones to keep!

I don't in any way mean to be discouraging, and I look forward to watching your progress.

(disclaimer: I spent months working on the wheel in the ceramics studio, and only fired one planter in all that time--but I learned from every one of those bowls that I destroyed, and the one that I kept was pretty nice.)
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby wyardley » Apr 23rd, '13, 12:07

Watch videos online to see how they form the lid and the lip for the lid. It's not the same for every pot shape, but you should be able to find some that are pretty close.

It's been a while, but I think in many cases you actually put a flat piece across the top, then another, then cut out the lip and opening. You will probably want to make several equal size, equal thickness circles for the top, bottom, lid, and lip. It really is quite difficult (the only time I got to try, I gave up completely in frustration).

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dKqwuS-UHkk
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jOcrwGAff8s

Notice also how she has a clay slug on top of the banding wheel.

If you order more from CCA, check out the step by step poster (BK 956) on this page.
http://www.chineseclayart.com/ChineseCl ... _books.asp

The hardness of the material is also important - too hard or too soft, and you won't be able to work it right. My memory of how to tell that the texture's right is a bit fuzzy. You can experiment with using a hair dryer on it to soften it a bit.
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » Apr 23rd, '13, 23:54

I just got a new video in the mail and it's been very helpful. Can't wait to try some of the new stuff out on the next pot.

Today, I had a long day at work (proofs not working out...ugh, and I sort of hate working with differentials) - I was excited to get home and work on the base of my teapot!:

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Which I completed. The video I got in the mail has all kinds of obvious (but not obvious) things like: don't use slip to seal up something you're just going to carve off later well DUH! The next time I make a base I'll get that right.

Also, making and empty hollow "clay pod" is *essential.* It's what helps keep it round! I think that's (one) of my problems. I'm intimidated by the process. Butt now that I've seen 3 people do it in videos I think I can try.

Here is what I did with the top, I was able to add a lip:

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but it came at a price:

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Now, the handle is too low! And the spout is at the wrong angle (not flush with the body... would not pour smooth)

I want to add, that though I didn't photograph them my spout holes were really nice. In fact, I will take a photo before I recycle it, just to compare to later.

So between all these flaws I decided, debunix is right, not to suffer making a lid for a not-round pot. I'll start a new one. For now, it gets to sit on the shelf for a awhile before it gets recycled.

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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby AdamMY » Apr 27th, '13, 14:51

I am going to miss Kalamazoo.... Especially their Institute of Arts. I mean check out this kiln:

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Kalamazoo institute of arts Anagama kiln by Adam Yusko, on Flickr

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Kalamazoo institute of arts Anagama kiln by Adam Yusko, on Flickr

I was the small producer from the class this year, due to schedule things I couldn't make it to class or studio nearly as much as I wanted. But I have 8 pices going into this bad boy, and spent the morning working with both Wadding, and Splitting and moving Pine wood.
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby paul haigh » Apr 27th, '13, 17:58

Scrape shelves, kiln wash, wadding, loading, split and stack wood... The joys of firing are probably also found in labor camps. The experience is addictive, cuts, burns, and muscle strains included.

I am about to start loading my kiln as well. I am thankful that the weather is good- loading in NH in February for 18 hours... Not as addictive.

Have fun!
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby GreenwoodStudio » Apr 27th, '13, 18:46

Nice dragon! Now let's see you tame it :wink:
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » Apr 27th, '13, 19:30

I hope you take some photos when it's lit-- and good for you learning the firing process!
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » May 1st, '13, 03:08

I know it's small but I had already cut the pieces for it before I decided to work larger for a bit.

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Today's attempt.


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Dirty nails are dirty.

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I still need to do the lid for this one. Should be fun. Next one is going to be at least 150ml. But, I liked getting the shape.


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Can't get a moment alone...
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » May 2nd, '13, 09:22

I made the lid. And I tried to draw on it a bit. Naturally that too will take practice.

Still, I think I'll fire this one just to see how it functions if I try to brew with it!

When I get 5 decent pieces I'll go and fire them. Any tips on that process? I'm going to pay a art center to do it for me... "1100C - 1200C" is not specific enough... But that's what I was told. What cone should I ask for?

I'm planning on letting everything dry for about two weeks to avoid any moisture issues.

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Can you tell what this is?

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Bold lines are better like sumi-e... but the clay fights back!

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I'm proud of this aspect... everything is aligned correctly!
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby GreenwoodStudio » May 2nd, '13, 11:10

I like the kitty! 2 weeks is plenty of time for drying, and a tip for future reference is to hold the piece up to your cheek. If it feels colder then room temp. it's still evaporating water off and needs to dry more. Sounds like your clay is a cone 5-6 (not 05-06) so it's a mid-range body.
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » May 4th, '13, 02:17

GreenwoodStudio wrote:I like the kitty! 2 weeks is plenty of time for drying, and a tip for future reference is to hold the piece up to your cheek. If it feels colder then room temp. it's still evaporating water off and needs to dry more. Sounds like your clay is a cone 5-6 (not 05-06) so it's a mid-range body.



Thanks for the tip. The long wait is also to try and get me to only send the best work.

I did another pot tonight and I'm getting faster! Just two hours.

I tried to make a "fu dog" lid pull, but that needs more work....

Thanks!

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This is the yellow "duan ni" clay from china clay arts... it's much nicer than the green or the "purple" -- for some reason it seems to be easier to work with... or maybe it was just the way I reduced the clay from slip... dunno.

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I like this better than a plain ball, but I need to make a less goofy lion.

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Can't wait to burnish this one... the bamboo tools really help keep it smooth, also I now have TWO towels to keep my hands from getting sloppy.
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby futurebird » May 5th, '13, 01:45

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New handle, new spout. Complete!

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I really like this ligher clay!

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What should I work on next?

:?:

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Saying hello and goodbye today... may they be better teapots in their next lives...
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Re: Amateur Hour (Non Artisan Member Made pots and cups)

Postby GreenwoodStudio » May 5th, '13, 09:59

Those clays are very expensive to be learning with. You should check into domestic commercial blends. You can get 50 lbs. for about $20-25 and try finding a company who will ship in a USPS flat rate box.

Also, I don't believe the clays from that company are genuine. They are most likely just loaded with stains to achieve the color. Personally I would not drink any tea that came into contact with that bare clay. Just an FYI
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