HK Tea Shop Recommendations

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby ChengduCha » Jun 17th, '13, 23:28

I just went to Lam Kie Yuen because it was close to my hotel and I was with someone who didn't care much about tea, so I didn't want to drag him through the tea shops of the city. :D

I went there during lunch time and the whole stuff was having lunch. One of their staff members came to ask me what I wanted and when I told her I'm looking to buy some pu erh, she tried to sell me some rather expensive loose shu, expecting a quick choice from me on the spot just by smelling it. :?

She obviously wanted to go back to her food and wanted me to make a very quick purchase, but I asked to try some of their sheng which she reluctantly agreed to.

The sheng was good enough for the money, so I bought some, but I wouldn't go there again.

If you're white expect a clueless tourist treatment.

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby gasninja » Jun 18th, '13, 00:03

That sucks. I think if I went to HK and couldn't spend at least one whole day shopping for tea my head would explode.

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby Tead Off » Jun 18th, '13, 00:17

gasninja wrote:That sucks. I think if I went to HK and couldn't spend at least one whole day shopping for tea my head would explode.

What would be worse is if you couldn't drink any tea for one whole day while being in Hong Kong. :D

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby Tead Off » Jun 18th, '13, 00:24

ChengduCha wrote:I just went to Lam Kie Yuen because it was close to my hotel and I was with someone who didn't care much about tea, so I didn't want to drag him through the tea shops of the city. :D

I went there during lunch time and the whole stuff was having lunch. One of their staff members came to ask me what I wanted and when I told her I'm looking to buy some pu erh, she tried to sell me some rather expensive loose shu, expecting a quick choice from me on the spot just by smelling it. :?

She obviously wanted to go back to her food and wanted me to make a very quick purchase, but I asked to try some of their sheng which she reluctantly agreed to.

The sheng was good enough for the money, so I bought some, but I wouldn't go there again.

If you're white expect a clueless tourist treatment.

In shops like this, I find it beneficial to ask them what is their best sheng. Then I ask them to brew some for me. This immediately tells me if their idea of good is similar to mine. It also shows them your serious about buying tea even if you don't buy their 'best' teas. It's an ice breaker. Some of these shops just have workers that are doing their job. They are not really into tea. It takes time to find shops that are knowledgeable and hospitable. A good shop will always invite you to sit and drink tea right away. It's part of the culture.

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby gingkoseto » Jun 18th, '13, 00:50

Tead Off wrote:In shops like this, I find it beneficial to ask them what is their best sheng. Then I ask them to brew some for me. This immediately tells me if their idea of good is similar to mine. It also shows them your serious about buying tea even if you don't buy their 'best' teas. It's an ice breaker. Some of these shops just have workers that are doing their job. They are not really into tea. It takes time to find shops that are knowledgeable and hospitable. A good shop will always invite you to sit and drink tea right away. It's part of the culture.

By "best", do you mean "the most expensive"? Otherwise, how is it possible to determine *the* best :mrgreen:

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby TIM » Jun 18th, '13, 01:04

gingkoseto wrote:
Tead Off wrote:In shops like this, I find it beneficial to ask them what is their best sheng. Then I ask them to brew some for me. This immediately tells me if their idea of good is similar to mine. It also shows them your serious about buying tea even if you don't buy their 'best' teas. It's an ice breaker. Some of these shops just have workers that are doing their job. They are not really into tea. It takes time to find shops that are knowledgeable and hospitable. A good shop will always invite you to sit and drink tea right away. It's part of the culture.

By "best", do you mean "the most expensive"? Otherwise, how is it possible to determine *the* best :mrgreen:


Tead 'best' means no dirty bubble :lol:

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby Tead Off » Jun 18th, '13, 02:27

TIM wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:
Tead Off wrote:In shops like this, I find it beneficial to ask them what is their best sheng. Then I ask them to brew some for me. This immediately tells me if their idea of good is similar to mine. It also shows them your serious about buying tea even if you don't buy their 'best' teas. It's an ice breaker. Some of these shops just have workers that are doing their job. They are not really into tea. It takes time to find shops that are knowledgeable and hospitable. A good shop will always invite you to sit and drink tea right away. It's part of the culture.

By "best", do you mean "the most expensive"? Otherwise, how is it possible to determine *the* best :mrgreen:


Tead 'best' means no dirty bubble :lol:

lol. That will get their attention!

Gingko-'best' is a term that many people use to describe their favorites. It is a poor term but it is used all the time. It is only for openers that I suggest such a thing and your response of 'most expensive?', is probably what many shops would start with. But the idea is to get their attention and go from there. Usually, I wouldn't even bother with a shop like Chengducha mentions if they show disinterest in serving me.

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Re: HK Tea Shop Recommendations

Postby jayinhk » Jul 9th, '13, 19:55

A lot of stores in HK have the 'cop and go' mentality and that's how many people buy their tea here. Walk in, tell them what you want, they weigh and bag it, you pay, and you're done. I wouldn't say you got tourist treatment at all. It entirely depends on the store.

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