Pu-Erh for beginners?

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby apache » Jul 16th, '13, 07:07

Or rinse it three or four times.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby genushumanusalice » Jul 16th, '13, 23:11

I rinsed it a couple of times so will definitely try breaking it up and airing it out. I'll also try a few others and see how they compare.

I wish I knew someone who was an established pu-erh drinker, to have someone to drink tea with and learn but at the same time it is probably also interesting to navigate it myself without being influenced by someone else's taste.

Thanks for the tips :)

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby Exempt » Jul 16th, '13, 23:47

genushumanusalice wrote:I wish I knew someone who was an established pu-erh drinker, to have someone to drink tea with and learn


Don't we all. With puerh, I find the more I learn the less I know :lol:

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby shah82 » Jul 17th, '13, 00:02

There are definitely shu with very good aromas and no funk.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby Tead Off » Jul 17th, '13, 02:51

Exempt wrote:
genushumanusalice wrote:I wish I knew someone who was an established pu-erh drinker, to have someone to drink tea with and learn


Don't we all. With puerh, I find the more I learn the less I know :lol:

You can also say the more you know, the less you learn.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby genushumanusalice » Jul 22nd, '13, 21:52

I'm trying a sample of a different ripe tea this morning. This time 2006 Dayi V93 and I like it much better. I'm no good at articulating tasting notes yet but I can say that I'm very pleased that I didn't give up on ripe tea all together after my first iffy experience. Although I still think I prefer raw to ripe, sipping on this tea is a wonderful experience and very calming. Thanks for encouraging me to get lots of samples, I better understand why now :)

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby mr mopu » Jul 23rd, '13, 15:04

genushumanusalice wrote:I'm trying a sample of a different ripe tea this morning. This time 2006 Dayi V93 and I like it much better. I'm no good at articulating tasting notes yet but I can say that I'm very pleased that I didn't give up on ripe tea all together after my first iffy experience. Although I still think I prefer raw to ripe, sipping on this tea is a wonderful experience and very calming. Thanks for encouraging me to get lots of samples, I better understand why now :)
Dayi is pretty bsafe for shou cha. The Jade luster or thick ripe cakes are good ones also. I have some tasting notes on them if you want. pm me and I will send a link for you.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby genushumanusalice » Jul 23rd, '13, 20:40

I'm not surprised to learn it is a safe tea. I have made a commitment to myself to get through the samples I have before buying anymore tea so will hold off on your suggestions until then. Thanks for the tips though, I may contact you later if that is ok?

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby mr mopu » Jul 23rd, '13, 20:42

genushumanusalice wrote:I'm not surprised to learn it is a safe tea. I have made a commitment to myself to get through the samples I have before buying anymore tea so will hold off on your suggestions until then. Thanks for the tips though, I may contact you later if that is ok?
That would be fine I have a few teas in the cupboard . not only Dayi but some others as well.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby Poseidon » Jul 23rd, '13, 21:59

is it just me or is pu-erh tea really difficult to understand. I get trying things but its very hard to commit without really understanding what the hell you are actually getting. I'm assuming this: Get some sheng and some shu and see what you enjoy most out of the two. Then branch out from there. Can someone let me know if this is the correct way to do it? I don't mean to hijack the thread but i didn't want to start another thread of the same question.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby genushumanusalice » Jul 23rd, '13, 22:05

No problem Poseidon, I made this thread hoping that it could provide some information to other people starting out too. Sorry I can't offer you any more tips, I'm fumbling around in the dark myself too still :)

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby mr mopu » Jul 23rd, '13, 22:07

Poseidon wrote:is it just me or is pu-erh tea really difficult to understand. I get trying things but its very hard to commit without really understanding what the hell you are actually getting. I'm assuming this: Get some sheng and some shu and see what you enjoy most out of the two. Then branch out from there. Can someone let me know if this is the correct way to do it? I don't mean to hijack the thread but i didn't want to start another thread of the same question.
The Menghai "red rhyme" started it all for me. When I learned to brew it right I was hooked and went on from there. I started with shu and am slowly working on sheng.

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby Poseidon » Jul 23rd, '13, 22:28

mr mopu wrote:
Poseidon wrote:is it just me or is pu-erh tea really difficult to understand. I get trying things but its very hard to commit without really understanding what the hell you are actually getting. I'm assuming this: Get some sheng and some shu and see what you enjoy most out of the two. Then branch out from there. Can someone let me know if this is the correct way to do it? I don't mean to hijack the thread but i didn't want to start another thread of the same question.
The Menghai "red rhyme" started it all for me. When I learned to brew it right I was hooked and went on from there. I started with shu and am slowly working on sheng.

So would you recommend someone starting out in the pu's to try shu first? Im looking to snag some samples soon and want to know where to start. Can pu-erh's be good if its not super old? What would you recommend for someone coming from primarily oolong and greens?

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby mr mopu » Jul 23rd, '13, 22:41

Poseidon wrote:
mr mopu wrote:
Poseidon wrote:is it just me or is pu-erh tea really difficult to understand. I get trying things but its very hard to commit without really understanding what the hell you are actually getting. I'm assuming this: Get some sheng and some shu and see what you enjoy most out of the two. Then branch out from there. Can someone let me know if this is the correct way to do it? I don't mean to hijack the thread but i didn't want to start another thread of the same question.
The Menghai "red rhyme" started it all for me. When I learned to brew it right I was hooked and went on from there. I started with shu and am slowly working on sheng.

So would you recommend someone starting out in the pu's to try shu first? Im looking to snag some samples soon and want to know where to start. Can pu-erh's be good if its not super old? What would you recommend for someone coming from primarily oolong and greens?

The "Red Rhyme " is similar to an aged oolong. As for the "green" tea I would recommend this link.http://www.ebay.com/itm/Snowy-Mountain- ... 5d3f7cc24f

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Re: Pu-Erh for beginners?

Postby Teaism » Jul 24th, '13, 01:39

genushumanusalice wrote:I wish I knew someone who was an established pu-erh drinker, to have someone to drink tea with and learn but at the same time it is probably also interesting to navigate it myself without being influenced by someone else's taste.


The best way to learn is to be true to yourself. A good tea taste good , clean, flavourful and hygenic. Hardly that you required to rinse so many times or air it for good tea. When you taste a good tea, recognise it. When you taste a bad tea reject it. I serve the good and best tea to people of all ages and experiece and most of them say it is good. A bad tea is bad, looks bad, feel bad and taste bad. Unless we cheat ourself to say it is good. This happen many times even with advance and experience drinkers , maybe because they got it cheap or they are tenaciously oblivious.

I always tell new tea drinker, don't get cheated twice, once by vendor and then by yourself. This is a good thinking to approach the tea for beginner.

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