Humidity for Aging Puerh


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby William » Jul 26th, '13, 14:30

In your opinion, is more important humidity or temperature?
I mean, is better a certain humidity value, for example 60%, and the temperature that can fluctuate between 15 C° and 30 C°, due to the normal seasonal cycle, or a certain temperature value, for example 20 C°, and the humidity that can fluctuate between 50% and 75% ?
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Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby tst » Jul 26th, '13, 16:35

Both are equally important IMO.

Neither should be overly restricted as both affect the aging process.
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Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby Exempt » Jul 26th, '13, 17:03

tst wrote:Both are equally important IMO.

Neither should be overly restricted as both affect the aging process.

+1
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Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby William » Jul 26th, '13, 17:33

I asked this thinking about the concept of absolute humidity and relative humidity.
I often read that the ideal conditions for a reasonably ripe Pu-erh tea is the classic formula 30° C - 70%.
Therefore, from the table I posted, it corresponds to 21 grams of water per cubic meter of air, which is broadly equivalent to a big closet.
Very similar values ​​we can find them at 35° C - 50% (19.6) or 25° C - 80% (18.2).
But is it really necessary to have 21 grams of water, in order to mature our Pu-Erh?
If instead we wanted to reduce by half this value, for example 10 grams of water per cubic meter, would be 20° C - 60% (10.3) or 25° C - 50% (11.4).
After all, our goal is to mature our Pu-Erh making sure to prevent the growth of any molds, so we should try to maintain the value of absolute humidity as low as possible?

Image
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Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby Exempt » Jul 26th, '13, 17:51

William wrote:I asked this thinking about the concept of absolute humidity and relative humidity.
I often read that the ideal conditions for a reasonably ripe Pu-erh tea is the classic formula 30° C - 70%.
Therefore, from the table I posted, it corresponds to 21 grams of water per cubic meter of air, which is broadly equivalent to a big closet.
Very similar values ​​we can find them at 35° C - 50% (19.6) or 25° C - 80% (18.2).
But is it really necessary to have 21 grams of water, in order to mature our Pu-Erh?
If instead we wanted to reduce by half this value, for example 10 grams of water per cubic meter, would be 20° C - 60% (10.3) or 25° C - 50% (11.4).
After all, our goal is to mature our Pu-Erh making sure to prevent the growth of any molds, so we should try to maintain the value of absolute humidity as low as possible?

Image

That's a very useful chart. According to my reading over the past year I average between 12-17 grams of water per cubic meter. I think there has to be a happy medium. While 20c 100%rh is a similar amount of water to 65c 10%rh I'm sure they would have very different effects on tea. I think the best environment for tea is one a human could comfortably live in. For me this is about 25c 70%rh. Of course, my local humidity isn't 70%rh so I have to boost it. The temperature is natural.

Basically what I'm saying is I don't think you should aim for as low a humidity as possible, there has to be a happy medium
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Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby William » Jul 26th, '13, 18:07

Exempt wrote:
William wrote:I asked this thinking about the concept of absolute humidity and relative humidity.
I often read that the ideal conditions for a reasonably ripe Pu-erh tea is the classic formula 30° C - 70%.
Therefore, from the table I posted, it corresponds to 21 grams of water per cubic meter of air, which is broadly equivalent to a big closet.
Very similar values ​​we can find them at 35° C - 50% (19.6) or 25° C - 80% (18.2).
But is it really necessary to have 21 grams of water, in order to mature our Pu-Erh?
If instead we wanted to reduce by half this value, for example 10 grams of water per cubic meter, would be 20° C - 60% (10.3) or 25° C - 50% (11.4).
After all, our goal is to mature our Pu-Erh making sure to prevent the growth of any molds, so we should try to maintain the value of absolute humidity as low as possible?

Image

That's a very useful chart. According to my reading over the past year I average between 12-17 grams of water per cubic meter. I think there has to be a happy medium. While 20c 100%rh is a similar amount of water to 65c 10%rh I'm sure they would have very different effects on tea. I think the best environment for tea is one a human could comfortably live in. For me this is about 25c 70%rh. Of course, my local humidity isn't 70%rh so I have to boost it. The temperature is natural.

Basically what I'm saying is I don't think you should aim for as low a humidity as possible, there has to be a happy medium


You misunderstood me, my intent would not be to maintain the relative humidity as low as possible, because this would go beyond a certain level, against oxidation itself. My intent would be to identify what is the best amount of absolute humidity; for example, if we set the ideal amount at 9 grams of water per cubic meter, it would correspond to 70% of humidity and 15° C.
William
 
Posts: 456
Joined: Jul 10th, '
Location: Italy, EU.

Re: Humidity for Aging Puerh

Postby Exempt » Jul 26th, '13, 18:20

William wrote:
Exempt wrote:
William wrote:I asked this thinking about the concept of absolute humidity and relative humidity.
I often read that the ideal conditions for a reasonably ripe Pu-erh tea is the classic formula 30° C - 70%.
Therefore, from the table I posted, it corresponds to 21 grams of water per cubic meter of air, which is broadly equivalent to a big closet.
Very similar values ​​we can find them at 35° C - 50% (19.6) or 25° C - 80% (18.2).
But is it really necessary to have 21 grams of water, in order to mature our Pu-Erh?
If instead we wanted to reduce by half this value, for example 10 grams of water per cubic meter, would be 20° C - 60% (10.3) or 25° C - 50% (11.4).
After all, our goal is to mature our Pu-Erh making sure to prevent the growth of any molds, so we should try to maintain the value of absolute humidity as low as possible?

Image

That's a very useful chart. According to my reading over the past year I average between 12-17 grams of water per cubic meter. I think there has to be a happy medium. While 20c 100%rh is a similar amount of water to 65c 10%rh I'm sure they would have very different effects on tea. I think the best environment for tea is one a human could comfortably live in. For me this is about 25c 70%rh. Of course, my local humidity isn't 70%rh so I have to boost it. The temperature is natural.

Basically what I'm saying is I don't think you should aim for as low a humidity as possible, there has to be a happy medium


You misunderstood me, my intent would not be to maintain the relative humidity as low as possible, because this would go beyond a certain level, against oxidation itself. My intent would be to identify what is the best amount of absolute humidity; for example, if we set the ideal amount at 9 grams of water per cubic meter, it would correspond to 70% of humidity and 15° C.

Oh, ok I understand. Ideally I think 10-14 grams per meter is in the range of just keeping our tea alive but having very little change, 15-19 would be slow development/dry storage, and 20-24 grams would be quicker development/wetter storage. That's just my opinion though, and I have very little experience compared to the other people on teachat
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