Western Brewing Recommendations


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby hobnob » Aug 6th, '13, 12:40

Hi

I've done lots of reading on here but still have a few questions about brewing oolongs western style.

As I understand, for western brewing you use about 2grams of tea per mug (standard mug holds roughly 200 - 250ml which is about 7.5oz)

I've also read to use a teaspoon or 1 gram per mug - personal preferences come into play of course.

1) What's a 'normal' amount of tea per standard mug/cup? Does this vary from oolong to oolong?

2) How many infusions can I expect per brew?

3) Do you put the lid on the teapot/brewing utensil/jug whilst brewing?

4) Which oolongs lend themselves to more infusions western style brewing?
Any recommendations? I like the greener oolongs (especially mountain ones and the buttery ones) but am not averse to mid roast either.

Thanks
hobnob
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Jul 14th, '
Location: The U of K

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby everyman » Aug 7th, '13, 11:14

Everyone has their preferences. I like strong tea.

With a good (read expensive) Oolong - Wuyi's are my favorite - I will only brew gongfu style in a gaiwan or pot.

BUT. I like a good (read BIG) cup of tea to kick start my mellon in the morning. I buy cheaper versions of my favorite teas and brew it "western style". So to your question which teas are good for western style, my answer is lesser quality/cheaper teas. I lean towards Seven Cups middle grades for that. (They call them Premium, and their better grade is usually called Imperial)

Using a small coffee cup (200 ml) not a Starbucks universe-swallowing mug, I use the following formula.

3 grams. First infusion, 3 minutes. Second infusion, 6 minutes. I don't get a strong enough cup to do a third infusion.

I don't use a lid but give it a try. Experimenting is half the fun. Sometimes I go to bed thinking, Yeah tomorrow I'm going to try __________.

Again, it's all personal taste. Some of Seven Cups teas are particularly strong and I adjust the grams down a bit. Some of the cheaper teas are weak and I adjust it up a bit. Usually no more than 1/2 a gram.

Hope that helps as a starting point.

Andrew
User avatar
everyman
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Feb 23rd, '
Location: Harrisburg, PA

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby hobnob » Aug 8th, '13, 05:41

It sure does! Thank you for your help :)
hobnob
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Jul 14th, '
Location: The U of K

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby everyman » Aug 8th, '13, 10:44

One more tip.

Use an infuser cup. Stainless mesh open top type dohickey.

Tea balls and other gizmos that are fully enclosed don't allow the tea to expand and make the most contact with the water.

Andrew
User avatar
everyman
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Feb 23rd, '
Location: Harrisburg, PA

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby hobnob » Aug 8th, '13, 13:28

Thanks. I've got a glass teapot (lost the lid) and a pitcher style small jug (lidless). I use both to brew.

I've also got a ceramic infuser mug, a glass gaiwan and a white gaiwan. Haven't used any of these to brew yet.

I can happily say that I stopped using the metal ball a while ago :P
hobnob
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Jul 14th, '
Location: The U of K

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby Joel Byron » Aug 8th, '13, 17:12

Ceramic infuser mugs can work well for western style brewing. They are usually larger capacity and have thick walls, so they retain heat well for the longer infusion times. I've got one at one of my workplaces that I use occasionally.
User avatar
Joel Byron
 
Posts: 110
Joined: Jan 19th, '

Re: Western Brewing Recommendations

Postby hobnob » Aug 9th, '13, 10:33

Good point about heat retention. I bought mine for work too, at home I always use my teapot or jug.
hobnob
 
Posts: 22
Joined: Jul 14th, '
Location: The U of K


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation