Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby thirst » Oct 8th, '13, 14:46

Thanks for the replies! I’ll just try things out, then. I was also concerned because I think I read somewhere that a new pot rather muddles the taste of a tea until you’ve steeped it enough, which would mean it would be a pretty long process to get it tasting normally and you’d always have to, er, reset the pot before trying it on a new category of tea. But maybe I’m just too impatient.

(Heh. If TS’ Dahongpao is indicative of other Wuyis, maybe it’s the exact opposite for me, as I didn’t like it that much.)

On a side note: Urgh. I may have ruined my pots, as I boiled them on a cloth to reduce vibration, of which dye has been released into the water. What was I thinking? Anyway, I’m just going to boil them again tomorrow and hope that the dye hasn’t been absorbed. :oops:
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby theredbaron » Oct 8th, '13, 15:31

thirst wrote:Thanks for the replies! I’ll just try things out, then. I was also concerned because I think I read somewhere that a new pot rather muddles the taste of a tea until you’ve steeped it enough, which would mean it would be a pretty long process to get it tasting normally and you’d always have to, er, reset the pot before trying it on a new category of tea. But maybe I’m just too impatient.

(Heh. If TS’ Dahongpao is indicative of other Wuyis, maybe it’s the exact opposite for me, as I didn’t like it that much.)

On a side note: Urgh. I may have ruined my pots, as I boiled them on a cloth to reduce vibration, of which dye has been released into the water. What was I thinking? Anyway, I’m just going to boil them again tomorrow and hope that the dye hasn’t been absorbed. :oops:



Don't be so paranoid. Pots are not that easily ruined. Just boil them normally again and whatever small particles of dye from the cloth will dissolve.
Personally, unless it's an old and dirty pot i don't boil them at all. I just give a pot a long steep with tea, make a few infusions i throw away, wash it a few times with boiling water, and start using it. It's more about getting over the years accumulated dirt, mold and bacteria out. The pot will develop then by itself.

All that "resetting" a pot is utter rubbish born out of the internet. If you have drunk for a while a particular category of tea in one pot, and then switch to another, for a brief time there may be a few ghosts of the old one, but with use that will soon disappear.

Don't believe too much on what is said on the internet.

I have, for example, a few pots i use when i travel and just want to take one small pot and cups around, and in those i drink all sorts of tea from.

As to dahongpao - it is very difficult to judge here what you may have drunk. Most of what is sold on the net as "dahongpao" is very low quality tea. Top quality dahongpao is very difficult to get, almost unobtainable, and very very expensive (that means easily at least a hundred if not several hundred dollars per 100 g). But if you ever have the chance to drink one - it is maybe the best tea there is.
You are better off finding OK Rou Gui or Shui Shien, which is by far preferable to bad dahongpao.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby thirst » Oct 8th, '13, 15:58

Thank you, that brightened my mood. :D

The Dahongpao was a 29$/100g 2012 one from Teaspring, haha. Will order other Wuyis some time – guess I shouldn’t give up on them that quickly :D
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby theredbaron » Oct 8th, '13, 17:53

thirst wrote:Thank you, that brightened my mood. :D

The Dahongpao was a 29$/100g 2012 one from Teaspring, haha. Will order other Wuyis some time – guess I shouldn’t give up on them that quickly :D



Top quality Wu Yi teas are very difficult to get, very rare, and very expensive. I recently started a topic on affordable Yancha which are very pleasant:

viewtopic.php?f=3&t=19014

Also Yancha, by the way, benefit from aging, but different from Sheng Pu Erh, they do not benefit from high humidity, and should be kept dry.

Just don't worry too much about your pots. Just start using them. At the beginning be mindful with your movements so that you don't break them. Especially important is that you always keep a finger on the lid when you carry them somewhere so it does not fall off.
When you pour tea, keep the handle between thumb and middle finger, and the index finger on the little knob on the lid - the most simple way. No need to try to be flashy and curl you index finger inside the handle and hold the knob on the lid with your thumb - when a pot is small you might burn your knuckle badly ;)

I prefer to keep things as simple as possible - no cluttering of the tea space with smelling cups, filters, etc. Just pot and cups, waste water container, tea boat, tea spoon, and pinch in case the spout gets stuffed.

The more you use them the whole mechanical procedure becomes internalized and instinctive. The pots will develop with use, and so will your tea drinking.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby Devoted135 » Oct 9th, '13, 11:27

theredbaron wrote:No need to try to be flashy and curl you index finger inside the handle and hold the knob on the lid with your thumb - when a pot is small you might burn your knuckle badly ;)


Some very good advice on this page. :) I'm just curious, why do you consider this method "flashy?" Maybe it's just my small hands, but this has been my go-to position*, and it feels a lot safer than your recommended method.


*One exception is my smallest pot, a 50mL with a curlicue handle that you can't actually get a finger through. Boy do I worry about snapping that handle off every time!
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby theredbaron » Oct 9th, '13, 11:41

Devoted135 wrote:
theredbaron wrote:No need to try to be flashy and curl you index finger inside the handle and hold the knob on the lid with your thumb - when a pot is small you might burn your knuckle badly ;)


Some very good advice on this page. :) I'm just curious, why do you consider this method "flashy?" Maybe it's just my small hands, but this has been my go-to position*, and it feels a lot safer than your recommended method.


*One exception is my smallest pot, a 50mL with a curlicue handle that you can't actually get a finger through. Boy do I worry about snapping that handle off every time!



Well, that's just me ;)

I have seen that quite often when people do elaborate tea presentations. I of course had to try that as well, but i have short and thick fingers. While pouring the tea my knuckle touched the side of the pot, got so badly burned, coz i of course couldn't just throw the pot out of my hands and break it... :lol:
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby Devoted135 » Oct 9th, '13, 13:33

theredbaron wrote:
Devoted135 wrote:
theredbaron wrote:No need to try to be flashy and curl you index finger inside the handle and hold the knob on the lid with your thumb - when a pot is small you might burn your knuckle badly ;)


Some very good advice on this page. :) I'm just curious, why do you consider this method "flashy?" Maybe it's just my small hands, but this has been my go-to position*, and it feels a lot safer than your recommended method.


*One exception is my smallest pot, a 50mL with a curlicue handle that you can't actually get a finger through. Boy do I worry about snapping that handle off every time!



Well, that's just me ;)

I have seen that quite often when people do elaborate tea presentations. I of course had to try that as well, but i have short and thick fingers. While pouring the tea my knuckle touched the side of the pot, got so badly burned, coz i of course couldn't just throw the pot out of my hands and break it... :lol:


Ahh, yes that makes sense. The finger size to pot handle size differential makes a big difference! :)
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby needaTEAcher » Oct 10th, '13, 14:58

theredbaron wrote:
thirst wrote:Thanks for the replies! I’ll just try things out, then. I was also concerned because I think I read somewhere that a new pot rather muddles the taste of a tea until you’ve steeped it enough, which would mean it would be a pretty long process to get it tasting normally and you’d always have to, er, reset the pot before trying it on a new category of tea. But maybe I’m just too impatient.

(Heh. If TS’ Dahongpao is indicative of other Wuyis, maybe it’s the exact opposite for me, as I didn’t like it that much.)

On a side note: Urgh. I may have ruined my pots, as I boiled them on a cloth to reduce vibration, of which dye has been released into the water. What was I thinking? Anyway, I’m just going to boil them again tomorrow and hope that the dye hasn’t been absorbed. :oops:


Don't be so paranoid. Pots are not that easily ruined. Just boil them normally again and whatever small particles of dye from the cloth will dissolve.
Personally, unless it's an old and dirty pot i don't boil them at all. I just give a pot a long steep with tea, make a few infusions i throw away, wash it a few times with boiling water, and start using it. It's more about getting over the years accumulated dirt, mold and bacteria out. The pot will develop then by itself.

All that "resetting" a pot is utter rubbish born out of the internet. If you have drunk for a while a particular category of tea in one pot, and then switch to another, for a brief time there may be a few ghosts of the old one, but with use that will soon disappear.

Don't believe too much on what is said on the internet.

I have, for example, a few pots i use when i travel and just want to take one small pot and cups around, and in those i drink all sorts of tea from.

As to dahongpao - it is very difficult to judge here what you may have drunk. Most of what is sold on the net as "dahongpao" is very low quality tea. Top quality dahongpao is very difficult to get, almost unobtainable, and very very expensive (that means easily at least a hundred if not several hundred dollars per 100 g). But if you ever have the chance to drink one - it is maybe the best tea there is.
You are better off finding OK Rou Gui or Shui Shien, which is by far preferable to bad dahongpao.



A few thoughts. First off, I have had legit wuyi rock tea once. It was divine. Lots of lower level but still nice teas out there, many of which I have been lucky enough to find, but I only had the real deal once (3rd gen).

A note on boiling and ruining. Pots get buried at sea for 100 years, pulled out, boiled, and used. I once had a lovely 70s jasmine green (Strange, eh?) out of a 100 year old shipwreck pot. Tasted great. Looked janky, but tasted great!!!

In terms of mixing and muddying, I have to admit that as I gain more experience and knowledge, I throw most of the rules out. I try to keep pots more or less categorized and paired, but it doesn't really matter. Just play with it and trust your tongue. If you notice a difference, or an unpleasant change, adapt and respond. Otherwise, just relax and enjoy!

Edit: changed da hong pao to wuyi rock tea. This is why I should't post when I'm in a hurry. Silly. :oops: Also, the jasmine green was 70s, not 80s. Again, I should be slower and more intentional!
Last edited by needaTEAcher on Oct 11th, '13, 11:40, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby needaTEAcher » Oct 10th, '13, 15:08

Found it! This is in Kuala Lumpur, at a Tea Expo (90% puerh, 10% other aged teas). Teapots everywhere!
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby thirst » Oct 13th, '13, 11:23

That thumb plus middle finger way of holding works beautifully and definitely makes for fewer burns! Thanks again for all the tips.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby TIM » Oct 17th, '13, 20:57

Image

吳亞彪, 飲泉壺. Black Iron Sand, ROC green clay.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby tingjunkie » Oct 17th, '13, 21:53

Drooling TIM! How big is that one?
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby TIM » Oct 18th, '13, 01:19

tingjunkie wrote:Drooling TIM! How big is that one?

Thanks Tingjunkie. Its about 100ml.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby Risdt » Oct 26th, '13, 10:07

Yixing factory 1 high fired hongni ba le.
Image
A Qing Shui Ni teapot from the early 90'ies.
Image

Both were acquired through origintea and are about 95ml. Been very happy with both of them :D The ba le serves for taiwanese gaoshan and the qsn will and has been used for all kinds of medium to high fire oolong.
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Re: Official/Different Yixing Show Off Topic!

Postby tingjunkie » Oct 26th, '13, 21:39

Nice Risdt! Given the current online Yixing market and prices, I think Origin Tea has some quality offerings. I'm looking forward to seeing what they turn up in the future. Please let us know how they perform once you've got some mileage with them!
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