Kucha?


For general/other topics related to tea.

Kucha?

Postby Ljung93 » Jan 28th, '14, 09:44

Hey folks!

There is a very interesting alkaloid called theacrine, closely related to caffeine, with a range of beneficial effects, and contained in large quantities in a variety of tea called C. assamica var. kucha. There's not much info available online on this variety, but apparently it grows naturally in Meng Song. It is supposed to be very bitter. Look at this interesting blog post by Zhi Zheng:

http://www.zhizhengtea.com/puerblog/men ... itter-tea/

I also found this study, which states that theacrine has been found to be a minor component of C. sinensis, too:

http://www.o-cha.net/english/conference ... B-P-78.pdf

Now I'm thinking, could this not be what gives some teas from Bulang Shan that special bitterness? I've always wondered why the bitterness of those teas was so, not just strong, but different. I have also heard Lao Man E tea referred to as "kucha".

What do you think about this? Does tea from any other mountains have this kind of bitterness?
Ljung93
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Mar 11th, '

Re: Kucha?

Postby Teaism » Jan 28th, '14, 09:59

I find Hekai has this bitterness character. It is very interesting and dynamic type of bitterness. I am still playing with it before arriving at any opinion on this mountain tea. :D
Cheers!
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby fdrx » Jan 28th, '14, 10:20

I might be wrong, but I think ZhiZheng is talking about the Mengsong area in the south of the bulang moutain, jinghong county, not the northern menghai one.
fdrx
 
Posts: 208
Joined: Sep 2nd, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby Ljung93 » Jan 28th, '14, 10:36

Teaism - Great, cause I can't get enough of that bitterness! and I have yet to try any Hekai. :D

fdrx - Oh, I didn't realize there were more than one Meng Song. This would be quite interesting. I hope zhi zheng sees this thread!
Ljung93
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Mar 11th, '

Re: Kucha?

Postby Teaism » Jan 28th, '14, 10:37

fdrx wrote:I might be wrong, but I think ZhiZheng is talking about the Mengsong area in the south of the bulang moutain, jinghong county, not the northern menghai one.


Oh... I am floored again.

I thought the topic was on bitter tea rather than region. Kucha in Chinese mean bitter tea.
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby Teaism » Jan 28th, '14, 10:40

Ljung93 wrote:Teaism - Great, cause I can't get enough of that bitterness! and I have yet to try any Hekai. :D


Quite hard to get Chun Liao, true mountain tea nowadays. A lot are blended. If you can find a real Hekai it would be great. I like its bitterness. Very exotic, almost like Beidou no 1 excitement in yancha.
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 682
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby fdrx » Jan 28th, '14, 10:47

Oh, I didn't realize there were more than one Meng Song.

yes the south bulangshan teas can be very bitter! On this banna map you can find both areas: the famous one and the south bulang one "xiao mengsong" or "damenglong mengsong"... and don't worry about zhizheng, he knows all that and muuuch more :wink:
fdrx
 
Posts: 208
Joined: Sep 2nd, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby fdrx » Jan 28th, '14, 11:25

If you can find a real Hekai it would be great. I like its bitterness.

i have a guangbie laozhai like that, but i thinks that it's a kind of bitterness that should mellow rather quickly, i don't know, i haven't tried it for quite a while
Last edited by fdrx on Jan 28th, '14, 11:28, edited 1 time in total.
fdrx
 
Posts: 208
Joined: Sep 2nd, '1

Re: Kucha?

Postby Ljung93 » Jan 28th, '14, 11:28

Teaism wrote:
fdrx wrote:I might be wrong, but I think ZhiZheng is talking about the Mengsong area in the south of the bulang moutain, jinghong county, not the northern menghai one.


Oh... I am floored again.

I thought the topic was on bitter tea rather than region. Kucha in Chinese mean bitter tea.


Maybe the old trees growing in and around Bulang has a higher content of theacrine, making it more bitter.
Ljung93
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Mar 11th, '

Re: Kucha?

Postby Ljung93 » Jan 28th, '14, 11:33

"The tea trees of Lao Man E grow very large leaves with thick and furry buds. There are two varietals in this area, one gives bitter tea (Ku Cha 苦茶) and the other one gives sweet tea (Tian Cha 甜茶)."

From here:

http://articles.bannacha.com/index.php? ... /lao-man-e
Ljung93
 
Posts: 16
Joined: Mar 11th, '


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation