a "Brewing The Perfect Cup of Green Tea" presentat


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a "Brewing The Perfect Cup of Green Tea" presentat

Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:41

am a huge green tea fanatic, and recently i applied to be a teacher at eht test prep giant Kaplan. for the interview, I will have to make a brief (5 minuites) presentation on a "how to" topic. i think i will discuss making a great cup of green tea. i know how to do this more or less, but wanted some input from the gurus and any armchair gurus as well. what are the crucial elements? what are some main points i should devote the bulk of my (brief) time to? any suggestions would be greatly appreciated. thanks!

Benjamin Allen
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:41

Benjamin--

Thanks for the post.

There are many factors that should be stressed in making a good cup of green tea, among the biggest would be water temperature (180 degrees), brewing time (about 3 minutes), amount of tea per cup (about 1.5 teaspoon) and quality of tea.

There are many more factors involved, as i'm sure you know, but there is not enough caffeine in green tea to keep your audience awake to name them all!

Hope this helps,

Chris
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:41

thanks for the advice, Chris. i had the presentation today, and i got the job! so my dorky knowledge of Green Tea minutiae has in fact come in handy!

thanks again.

Ben Allen
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:42

Ben--

Congrats!!!

Chalk up another benefit of green tea...

Now the next generation will ace their SATs ... thanks to our favorite beverage!

Always glad to help,

Chris
Adagio Maestro

Kaplan Grad
ps... minutiae = small or trivial details
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:42

Hello, I'm writing a story and I need to have some specifics on the price of green tea in Cambodia. As if it were a local monk purchasing bulk tea for the Wat's (Temple) consumption, can anyone help me out?
. Also is it government regulated? In what form does it come in, bags, boxes, What size, 1/4 kilo sacks, or what? Thank you.

Sincerely,
Mark D. Mooney
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:43

the most important thing on brewing a perfect cup of green tea as some green teas are so sensitive that 30 seconds makes a difference between a good cup of tea and a bitter nasty cup of tea. Both the brewing time and tempature are the most important things in brewing a good cup of tea. Water not above 180 degrees f and time very importans usually between 1 and a half to three minutes at most but depends on type of green tea more info call glens teas -n- things 406-755-8327 glen

Glens Tea -N- Things
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Postby teachat » Jun 7th, '05, 16:52

I applied (and qualified) for one of those test prep jobs once. Ben, I'll bet you could have screwed up a lot of the facts and still gotten the job if you were personable. Plus, bribing the interviewer with free tea is a sure bet.

Evan Draper
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Cold brew benefits

Postby Larry N Baker » Jul 26th, '05, 23:25

Does anyone know what is the nutrient profile of green teas brewed for several hours in water at room temperature [sun tea] in contrast to brewing it for afew minutes in water just below boiling temperature? Is cold brew anybetter or worse nutritionally?

Does lemon juice with its citric acid harm any tea nutrients?

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Postby PeteVu » Jul 27th, '05, 10:52

chemically speaking, considering the reaction, you have two things to consider: energy and time. basically heat relates to energy, and if you dont have enough energy, you will never make the cross over the activation energy barrier, or the inital energy hump required for the reaction to take place. From a molecular viewpoint, the water molecules have to gain enough energy, or speed/power, to run into the tea molecules and pull them off into the water. So in the most extreme circumstances of very low temperature, the activation energy will never be reached, and tea will never brew.
At room temperature, tea does brew, thus you know there is enough energy, but it is very far from the required activation energy. This is where time plays a larger role. Energy of a system is not completely uniform, some molecules gain more power when its more important with well timed bumps with other molecules. Although the NET or average energy is the same, some molecules are higher than others, which allows them to break the activation energy. thus, more time means a better chance that water molecules randomly gain the required energy to pull tea molecules and thus steep.
so instead of waiting, we can just increase the energy by using hot water and thus ensure that the net energy is already very near the activation energy, then time doesnt play a significant role, and thus the water molecules can easily bombard the tea molecules and steep quickly.
In other words, the way i see it, high energy or low energy, tea is gonna steep the same way eventually, and thus hot water or room temperature water will get you the same nutritional results, just hot water will get u there faster.
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