Multi Functionable Tea Scoop


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Postby Beanbean » Apr 3rd, '08, 19:34

I have a small metric scale and now that I know to use approximately 2.5 grams of tea per 6-8 ounces of water, I will be using the scale to make tea. I just made my first cup of Golden Monkey using the "level teaspoon" method and ended up with only 1.2 grams of tea in the pot. Needless to say, I had a rather anemic and disappointing cup of tea. :( My next cup will be better!
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Postby GeoffK » Apr 3rd, '08, 20:13

insanitylater wrote:my family already finds it weird i check water temperature i couldn't imagine their reaction to me taking out a scale each time and weighing tea


I felt like a total tea geek taking out my scale in front of company....and then they tasted the cup of tea I made... Absolutely perfect.

If you're already checking water temp then how much more is it to check you have the exact amount of tea you need ;)
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Postby soapy » Apr 3rd, '08, 21:46

I'm awaiting for my new variable temp kettle (utiliTEA)

generally I don't' bother with the scale and just use 1-2 tsps of tea depending on which I'm using time of day and strength/weakness I'm in the mood for...

someone want to show me or come make me a perfect cup -o-tea! :lol:

only been doing this an undetermined amount of time..... :oops: :roll:
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Postby tenuki » Apr 3rd, '08, 22:39

<lighthearted rant>
My opinion on this topic and other similar ones is that all these devices remove you from direct observation and thought about the tea leaves, the water and the brewing process itself and are therefore a Bad Idea™ if you are searching for a perfect cup of tea. As far as I'm concerned it's the equivalent of my local coffee shop replacing hand pull machines and smart, well trained baristas who occasionally make mistakes along with their brilliant successes with machines that accurately measure, time and produce a thoroughly mediocre cup of coffee every single time.

Seriously, I read these posts and imagine people totally ignoring the tea for some darn numbers on a machine. Stop it!

When I brew a tea, I take a good look at the leaves, sniff them, give them a quick rinse, look at the leaves again, swirl them around in the heated container and sniff them again, taste the rinse water, then brew based on my direct and careful observations. I can't imagine using a scale or fancy measuring spoon and thinking that was better...

You people probably wander around the living room looking for the remote to turn off the TV and walk past the TV's power button 5 or 6 times before you find it, am I right?

Making tea is an art not a science IMHO.
</lighthearted rant>
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Postby GeoffK » Apr 3rd, '08, 23:06

tenuki wrote:<lighthearted rant>
Making tea is an art not a science IMHO.
</lighthearted rant>


Totally fair point. But for the new tea fan using tools to get consistent results really really helps to be able to develop the senses to be able to be more artistic about tea.

If you can reliably make good tea then you know when things aren't right and you can adjust.
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Postby Mary R » Apr 3rd, '08, 23:23

Pentox wrote:Who ever knows what goes on in the mind of Mary?


Heh...I totally walked into that one. :P
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Postby osadczuk » Apr 3rd, '08, 23:37

Mary R wrote:Not to go entirely off topic, but how do you like those adjustable spoons? I almost bought one when I was setting up my kitchen, but read a report (most likely from Cook's Illustrated or Alton Brown...but I'm not 100% anymore) that they were very problematic.


They were my obligatory purchase at a Pampered Chef party years ago (before I discovered the joy of stoneware). I actually like mine quite a bit, but I only use them for non-liquids and if I will be measuring several ingredients. Or if I'm measuring out of small boxes, specifically baking soda. The small one is the perfect size/shape for a baking soda box. It's my "go to" measurer for home-made anti-acids.
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Postby Space Samurai » Apr 3rd, '08, 23:42

If people prefer to make tea by feel, that's fine. I see your point of view, it is valid, and I understand. But what rankles me is when they take the stance, light-hearted or otherwise, that the use of precise instruments is not only inferior, but misguided as well.

tenuki wrote:Seriously, I read these posts and imagine people totally ignoring the tea for some darn numbers on a machine. Stop it!


There seems to be this assumption that those of us with digital equipment are mindless slaves to them, when in reality they are just tools. A spoon is a tool; a scale is a more precise tool. Obviously if I use three grams of tea and the result is poor or mediocre, I don't keep using three grams; I adjust. Science and art can exist in a balance.

Also, there is often an idea that keeping it simple is more traditional. According to Okakura Kakuzo, early Chinese tea drinkers had something like 23 different items in their tea equipage.
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Postby Beanbean » Apr 3rd, '08, 23:53

Yeah, I'm not looking for a "perfect" cup of tea. I'm looking for a cup of tea that brings me pleasure. If I start with a particular measurement of X tea and it doesn't make me happy, I'll adjust. No biggie.
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Postby tenuki » Apr 4th, '08, 00:02

Space Samurai wrote:If people prefer to make tea by feel, that's fine. I see your point of view, it is valid, and I understand. But what rankles me is when they take the stance, light-hearted or otherwise, that the use of precise instruments is not only inferior, but misguided as well.


It was a rant against myself too. I own 2 digital scales, 3 tea measuring spoons, 3 tea thermometers, 2 sand timers, a tea digital timer, a iphone timer, and am talking about creating a computer program to keep track of brewing history. So I obviously agree with you up to a point.

I just thought we needed a counterpoint. :)
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Postby scruffmcgruff » Apr 4th, '08, 00:02

Space Samurai wrote:If people prefer to make tea by feel, that's fine. I see your point of view, it is valid, and I understand. But what rankles me is when they take the stance, light-hearted or otherwise, that the use of precise instruments is not only inferior, but misguided as well.

tenuki wrote:Seriously, I read these posts and imagine people totally ignoring the tea for some darn numbers on a machine. Stop it!


There seems to be this assumption that those of us with digital equipment are mindless slaves to them, when in reality they are just tools. A spoon is a tool; a scale is a more precise tool. Obviously if I use three grams of tea and the result is poor or mediocre, I don't keep using three grams; I adjust. Science and art can exist in a balance.

Also, there is often an idea that keeping it simple is more traditional. According to Okakura Kakuzo, early Chinese tea drinkers had something like 23 different items in their tea equipage.


+1
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Postby tenuki » Apr 4th, '08, 00:16

Space Samurai wrote:Also, there is often an idea that keeping it simple is more traditional. According to Okakura Kakuzo, early Chinese tea drinkers had something like 23 different items in their tea equipage.


The idea I have is that keeping it simple is simpler... ;) I certainly wouldn't stand for anything traditional in my house!
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Postby Pentox » Apr 4th, '08, 01:05

Personally I view my scale as a tool to help me judge weights of teas and to give me a starting point for trying something. When I got a silver needle for the first time I had no idea what approx vol/size 5g was. So my scale helped me. Once I got a good eye for that I moved on to adjusting it to my preference, it's a tool, I don't rely on it, but it's a good starting point.
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Postby tenuki » Apr 4th, '08, 03:50

Mary R wrote:Not to go entirely off topic, but how do you like those adjustable spoons? I almost bought one when I was setting up my kitchen, but read a report (most likely from Cook's Illustrated or Alton Brown...but I'm not 100% anymore) that they were very problematic.

So I put my $6 towards a traditional set of spoons. And somewhere in the middle of writing this, I realize I wasted about 15 minutes of my life researching a $6 product. What the heck was I thinking?


People measure stuff when they are cooking?!?! Ah, _that's_ what all those fractions in the cookbook meant... ;)
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Postby soapy » Apr 4th, '08, 06:58

I purchased my spoons at a party a couple years ago now.. I love them! Never had an issue with them...I use them both especially for the smaller increments of spices & herbs which actually lead me to thinking why not for the different teas as a guide but a scoop
I don't' want to weigh out my teas I just want to drink them....maybe why I don't like some of them...
I can't find people to give them away too either....oh well

buy the way when my kids loose the remotes I get up and use the dials!!! I'm certainly not lazy! (I do see your point though ) ;o)
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