dong ding??


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

dong ding??

Postby stargazer » May 4th, '08, 11:00

Has anyone tried this tea?
Any recommendations where to order?
teaspring?
teafromtaiwan?
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Postby tenuki » May 4th, '08, 13:17

My hands down favorite is 'Legend of Tung Ting' from the ebay store Teahome. I drink Dong Ding every morning as my first tea, so I've had em all and often compared them side by side. :)

They ship pretty fast too and their tea is always fresh, I order from them every couple months (for Gao Shan's too) and have never been disappointed.
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Postby auggy » May 4th, '08, 13:30

My only experience with it was SpecialTeas.com's oolong sampler - it had a tung ting jade in it. I really liked it. And from what I understand, SpecialTeas isn't always the best as far as quality (right?) so I would think if it was good from them, it'd be really good elsewhere.
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Postby Victoria » May 4th, '08, 17:34

In honor of this thread I'm having some TeaSpring right now.
I have both TeaSpring and Teahome - both very good.
The TeaSpring is slightly less vegetal.
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Postby Chip » May 4th, '08, 18:20

Victoria wrote:In honor of this thread I'm having some TeaSpring right now.
I have both TeaSpring and Teahome - both very good.
The TeaSpring is slightly less vegetal.


They are extremely variable. I have had some that blew me away and others that were mediocre.

I currently have the TeaSpring offering as well...form EO.
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Postby Salsero » May 4th, '08, 18:35

My impression is that Dong Ding is the general denomination of a huge variety of teas for the same general area of Taiwan. Not as huge as Tie Guan Yin, but still enormous.
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Postby ABx » May 4th, '08, 18:56

Salsero wrote:My impression is that Dong Ding is the general denomination of a huge variety of teas for the same general area of Taiwan. Not as huge as Tie Guan Yin, but still enormous.
Dong Ding/Tung Ting is a particular mountain in Taiwan. Most gaoshan (high mountain) is denoted by the mountain that they come from - http://www.teafromtaiwan.com/Tea_Areas. ... 85536eaf0f

Hou De has some of the better stuff I've had, and Tea from Taiwan also has some great stuff.
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Postby Salsero » May 4th, '08, 19:08

ABx wrote:Hou De has some of the better stuff I've had, and Tea from Taiwan also has some great stuff.
I haven't had the Hou De except a 2006 Dong-Ding 'Hong Shui" that was deliciously crème brulee and yellow fruits. I liked the Tea from Taiwan a lot, very gaoshan character, light, intense, and floral.

The Teahome Legend of Tung Ting struck me as odd and I don't know if it's because of the degree of oxidation or the roasting. The small sample I had struck me as darker, fruity, and less lively than the Tea from Taiwan version. I think if I drank the Legend a bit more I could get into it, however. It's just that it was so different from what I was expecting. Tenuki's comment encourages me to go back to it with an open mind.
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Postby Chip » May 4th, '08, 19:20

ABx wrote:
Salsero wrote:My impression is that Dong Ding is the general denomination of a huge variety of teas for the same general area of Taiwan. Not as huge as Tie Guan Yin, but still enormous.
Dong Ding/Tung Ting is a particular mountain in Taiwan. Most gaoshan (high mountain) is denoted by the mountain that they come from - http://www.teafromtaiwan.com/Tea_Areas. ... 85536eaf0f

Hou De has some of the better stuff I've had, and Tea from Taiwan also has some great stuff.


There is a good parallel term use, Sal. I have read that it today refers to the general style of oolong from an ever increasing wider region. The popularity far outstripping supply...so the area is expanded. Very little of this oolong today is actually grown on Dong Ding.

This is what I read...this would also explain the extreme variability in the flavor profile of the brewed tea.

I am always willing to try a good one, but it can be pricey and then there is no guarantee it will be what I am looking for.
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Postby tenuki » May 4th, '08, 19:29

I agree Chip, as I understand it most of the Dong Ding today refers to stuff made in the style, not from the region. IMO most of it is substandard too, but hey, bad tea is still pretty good. :")

Here is a side by side comparison I did between Teaspring's Dong Ding (which I do not like and have had more than once) and Teahome's Legend of Tung Ting.
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Postby Chip » May 4th, '08, 19:37

tenuki wrote:I agree Chip, as I understand it most of the Dong Ding today refers to stuff made in the style, not from the region. IMO most of it is substandard too, but hey, bad tea is still pretty good. :")

Here is a side by side comparison I did between Teaspring's Dong Ding (which I do not like and have had more than once) and Teahome's Legend of Tung Ting.


Yeah, I have had too much mediocre Dong Ding that left me wondering why did I spend so much for it (or why didn't I get a sample first).

But when you get one that meets or exceeds your expectations...WOW...
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Postby tenuki » May 4th, '08, 19:42

Chip wrote:when you get one that meets or exceeds your expectations...WOW...


Hey, you are preaching to the choir, I have it every morning, it's my first tea pretty much to start the day. Unfortunately everyone has different definitions of good, so you have to slog through the crap to find your personal diamond.
Last edited by tenuki on May 4th, '08, 19:58, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Chip » May 4th, '08, 19:56

tenuki wrote:
Chip wrote:when you get one that meets or exceeds your expectations...WOW...


Hey, you are preaching to the choir their


You can sing too? :shock: :lol:
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Postby tenuki » May 4th, '08, 19:58

Chip wrote:
tenuki wrote:
Chip wrote:when you get one that meets or exceeds your expectations...WOW...


Hey, you are preaching to the choir their


You can sing too? :shock: :lol:


Yes, but me english is not good very.
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Postby ABx » May 4th, '08, 20:07

I haven't really encountered Dong Ding as a generic name, though I've heard a few convoluted things when it comes to naming. One thing I've heard recently is using "Dong Ding style" referring to the way that they used to roast their oolongs in Dong Ding some time ago. I've also heard some say that "Wulong" (vs "oolong") specifically refers to high mountain oolong from Taiwan (and specifically the qing xing cultivar). When it comes down to it I think that vendors don't strictly adhere to naming conventions.

One thing I have definitely encountered, however, is the different grading of tea. Higher grades seem to tend towards the lighter and more ephemeral, where the lower grades tend to be more up-front. Serenity Art's selection of 4 different grades of the same Dong Ding do help with this. Of theirs, my favorite is actually the 2nd grade more than the first, but I think each person will find their own favorite.

To my understanding, each farmer will usually create batches of different grades. The top grade will be made with select leaves in lower quantities and probably much more care, and then on down the line. The growing conditions and such will also likely dramatically change the characteristics. I'm sure there are many different farms on Dong Ding, and you'd probably need to get from a vendor like Hou De to know anything about what farm you're getting from.

I'm sure it's just like Wuyi yancha - the different ones you get can be dramatically different, but they're all from Wuyi mountain.

That's not to say that what you've heard is wrong, Chip, just that there's so much ambiguity and so many factors that I don't know if there's much way to tell without either more information or getting to intimately know the differences between gaoshan from different mountains and trying anything you're not sure of.
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