Jenaer Teapot


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Jenaer Teapot

Postby SereniTea » Oct 31st, '05, 22:33

Hi...
I am thinking about buying one of these teapots. Can they be heated directly on a gas stove? Or do you need a kettle to heat the water and then pour it into the teapot? Thanks!
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Postby Marlene » Oct 31st, '05, 23:29

Unless you're talking about the kettle, you need to heat up the water and pour it into the pot.
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Postby floridahawk » Nov 1st, '05, 09:44

Oh, and just so you know, do not put any porcelain on the stove. My roommate did this and ruined a teapot I didn’t even have for a week. Needless to say, he bought me a new teapot. I would have thought that not putting porcelain directly on a heating source would have been obvious, but apparently not.
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Postby Marlene » Nov 1st, '05, 14:28

Oh jeez! Duh!
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Postby JamesBeach » Nov 29th, '05, 23:03

Now, this may not be suggested and follow at your own risk, but I heat my Luna teapot (a Jenaer product) directly on the heating element of a hot plate, which is basically a portable and enclosed unit of what is built into your typical electric stove. I bring it from the temperature of our cold Oregon tap water to boiling. There have been no problems, and of course the pot has not shattered. It does take a little longer than an electric tea kettle, but is more convenient in my opinion.

Jenaer's teapots should be made of tempered glass, which is made to withstand high temperatures and endure a lot of flexing. For example, I have a tempered glass desk top that holds an 80 or so pound 21" CRT without issue. From my limited but logical understanding of how heat energy is conducted, heating the teapot itself should be *less* stressful than suddenly pouring 212 degree water into it -- the difference being a gradual temperature climb contrasted to an immediate one. And these teapots can, without worry, be filled with boiling water from a cold state (i.e., not preheated) without worry.

So you should be okay, but still it's at your own risk. There may be some fundamental difference between my hot plate and the way heat is delivered via an ordinary electric stove or a gas range, thought I personally doubt it.
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