stone pressed vs. atom crushing hydraulic pressed pu


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stone pressed vs. atom crushing hydraulic pressed pu

Postby puerhking » Jul 9th, '08, 16:10

now that i have tried a few stone pressed pu's it seems to me that they are much more mild...and therefore more approachable. is this because i can get more whole leaves or is there more to this mystery?

do tell.
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Re: stone pressed vs. atom crushing hydraulic pressed pu

Postby hop_goblin » Jul 9th, '08, 17:20

puerhking wrote:now that i have tried a few stone pressed pu's it seems to me that they are much more mild...and therefore more approachable. is this because i can get more whole leaves or is there more to this mystery?

do tell.


well, its not entirely a mystery.. There are 2 reasons for this. 1. Stone pressed beengs allow more air which lets the leaves breath, while Tie beengs or "Iron pressed" compress them to holy beat hell. This does not facilitate aging very effeciently meaning it takes longer for the air and humidity to do their magic.. 2. It has to do with the brewing itself. When you break apart a stone pressed beeng, the leaves are more in tact so when you brew you generally brew with much larger pieces. However, with Iron beengs, people generally will break up the leaves as a consequence of trying to pry them out. As with any tea, more fragments, the more bitter a tea can become. Try steeping tie beengs with less leaf with a lower steeping time or adjust either of the two. I hope this helps!

Cheers
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Postby puerhking » Jul 9th, '08, 18:00

yes.....yes this makes perfect sense. thanks for the reply. it is so much more pleasant to pull apart a stone pressed bing....looking for the best next leaf to pry apart.....oh wait i need to balance those with a bud.....lol.
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Postby hop_goblin » Jul 9th, '08, 18:05

puerhking wrote:yes.....yes this makes perfect sense. thanks for the reply. it is so much more pleasant to pull apart a stone pressed bing....looking for the best next leaf to pry apart.....oh wait i need to balance those with a bud.....lol.


Anytime!
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Re: stone pressed vs. atom crushing hydraulic pressed pu

Postby bearsbearsbears » Jul 11th, '08, 13:11

puerhking wrote:now that i have tried a few stone pressed pu's it seems to me that they are much more mild...and therefore more approachable. is this because i can get more whole leaves or is there more to this mystery? do tell.


I haven't found much correlation between compression and mildness or approachability. But, Hop's point about the "wholeness" of the leaf stands true. Broken leaves = stronger flavor.

hop_goblin wrote:<snip>Tie beengs or "Iron pressed" compress them to holy beat hell. This does not facilitate aging very effeciently meaning it takes longer for the air and humidity to do their magic. <snip>


There are actually 3 types of compression: stone-pressed, hydraulic-pressed, and hyrdaulic pressed molded tea, or tie bing. Tie bing refers to a particular kind of high compression molded cake that has flat edges and hobnails. Most hydraulic pressed teas are not as highly compressed as tie bing and nearly all take on the traditional qi zi shape. Probably over 95% of all non-Xiaguan cakes are hydraulic pressed qi zi cakes.

Also, many companies claim to stone press their tea but do not. They just steam it longer and hydraulic press it to a lower compression.

Stronger compression became valued because not only was it faster and more economical, but it also kept the pu'er cake more intact over time. Aging in humid environments loosens leaves from the cake. For example, famous antique cakes like Tongqing and Tongxing of the 1920s-40s now weigh only 300-320g, sometimes less; some 30g-57g of tea was lost over time because of the loosening of the leaves. 1950s-1970s guang yun gong bing, which were tie bing, have not lost nearly as much leaf, and probably won't. They're still very tightly compressed.

I've even seen my production of cakes loosen some in wet storage, and my cakes were somewhat tightly compressed with hydraulics. I've got some chunks of it in wet storage in a jar, and a good portion of leaves have already loosened, some 3% of it by weight.
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Re: stone pressed vs. atom crushing hydraulic pressed pu

Postby bearsbearsbears » Jul 11th, '08, 13:13

One more thing:

hop_goblin wrote:This does not facilitate aging very effeciently meaning it takes longer for the air and humidity to do their magic.


Wet stored tie bing age nearly as fast as hydraulic tea. Dry or drier stored tie bing...not so much!
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Postby puerhking » Jul 11th, '08, 15:15

hey thanks b's b's b's for the detailed info on that. so one can make a pretty good argument that it is good to have both and if your going to age a long time or wet store hydraulic would be better...eh?
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