2003 Dayi Yiwu Arbor Pu-erh Tea Cake Sampler


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

2003 Dayi Yiwu Arbor Pu-erh Tea Cake Sampler

Postby taitea » Oct 15th, '08, 12:07

2003 Dayi Yiwu Arbor Pu-erh Tea Cake Sampler

So I have been tasting the sheng samples I got from puerhshop lately, and this one in particular has caught my attention. I find it tastes nothing like any of the other samples I got. In fact, it tastes more like shu than sheng to me.

"It went into aging in a dry storage that delivered a taste of a good aged green Pu-erh. "

Does the dry storage account for the difference in taste? I thought that was the normal way to store sheng...

Is this typically what an aged sheng would be approaching in terms of taste? I'm still trying to grasp how a properly aged sheng will differ from shu. Apperently they will be quite different?

Edit: I'm also wondering if I should be brewing this in my sheng pot, seeing as it is so different from my other shengs.
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Postby tenuki » Oct 15th, '08, 13:38

I've got that cake, now you've peaked my interest, maybe I'll break it out of storage and try it and let you know. real aged shen does taste more like shu than shen (shu is trying to taste like aged shen obviously, and failing usually).
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Postby Wesli » Oct 15th, '08, 17:41

That cake is a wonderful example of a wet-stored sheng. It takes on some of the characteristics of a dry-stored aged sheng at an early age, but it does so imperfectly.

Shu and aged sheng are closer in taste than young and aged sheng. As Tenuki said, shu is trying to imitate aged sheng. You'll have to analyze the tastes of many samples of each to see what's really going on.

You can get away with brewing it in a young sheng pot. I have a pot for aged, which I don't use for young sheng, but I would probably throw this one in there.

Did you like it?
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Postby Salsero » Oct 15th, '08, 18:23

Wesli wrote: That cake is a wonderful example of a wet-stored sheng.
I think Jim must have said dry-stored when he meant wet-stored. It's easy to slip when you write many product descriptions. I once found a shu listed as sheng which he promptly fixed once I pointed it out. Drop him a note. If it's an error, he will appreciate your help.
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Postby shogun89 » Oct 15th, '08, 18:29

Yeah that cake sure does look like a wet storage cake. 2003 and that thing is dark and muddy looking.
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Postby Victoria » Oct 15th, '08, 18:38

Dayi Yiwu could also = Da Ye wuyi, one of my favorite wuyi.
So, I'm interested.
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Postby tenuki » Oct 15th, '08, 18:45

Victoria wrote:Dayi Yiwu could also = Da Ye wuyi, one of my favorite wuyi.
So, I'm interested.


lol.

DaYi is an old brand that Menghai is reviving
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Postby heavydoom » Oct 15th, '08, 18:59

apparently there is a market for wet stored green pu. i have a cake like that, a wet stored one, and the funkiness is there, just like a well aged raw pu. my cake is from 2003 though. personally, i don't like this wet stored format of pu. i much prefer a cake that has been aged well over 20 years.
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Postby Salsero » Oct 15th, '08, 19:05

heavydoom wrote: personally, i don't like this wet stored format of pu. i much prefer a cake that has been aged well over 20 years.
If it is done well, it can yield a nice compromise between expensive old stuff and not very interesting young stuff. I have had a couple good experiences ... none that I would pay that kind of money for however!
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Postby eanglin » Oct 15th, '08, 19:11

Wet stored? I really want to try this now...*Sits on hands*

Has anyone tried this brick?- 2003 Longfeng Pu-erh Tea Brick
http://www.puerhshop.com/index.php?main ... ucts_id=27

It also has me intrigued, and its a lot closer to my budget.
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Postby Victoria » Oct 15th, '08, 19:17

tenuki wrote:
Victoria wrote:Dayi Yiwu could also = Da Ye wuyi, one of my favorite wuyi.
So, I'm interested.


lol.

DaYi is an old brand that Menghai is reviving


Ha!
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Re: 2003 Dayi Yiwu Arbor Pu-erh Tea Cake Sampler

Postby hop_goblin » Oct 15th, '08, 19:33

taitea wrote:2003 Dayi Yiwu Arbor Pu-erh Tea Cake Sampler

So I have been tasting the sheng samples I got from puerhshop lately, and this one in particular has caught my attention. I find it tastes nothing like any of the other samples I got. In fact, it tastes more like shu than sheng to me.

"It went into aging in a dry storage that delivered a taste of a good aged green Pu-erh. "

Does the dry storage account for the difference in taste? I thought that was the normal way to store sheng...

Is this typically what an aged sheng would be approaching in terms of taste? I'm still trying to grasp how a properly aged sheng will differ from shu. Apperently they will be quite different?

Edit: I'm also wondering if I should be brewing this in my sheng pot, seeing as it is so different from my other shengs.


I actually recieved this sample sometime back.. I haven't had the chance to taste it.. I will soon and give you my impressions laterz.
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Postby shogun89 » Oct 15th, '08, 19:51

eanglin, I haven't had it so take this with a grain of salt. It does not look at all impressive to me, Looks like just tea fanning compose it and I hate to say it but for $7 for that size your not going to be getting anything special. But hey, its cheap and if your interested, go for it.
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Postby thanks » Oct 15th, '08, 20:02

Hey five years is not that long. This seems like a perfect candidate to dry store as it most likely hasn't lost it's complexities. Imagine it, guys. In only another 3-5 years this tea has the potential to be tasting really amazing. I need to try a sample of this!
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Postby taitea » Oct 15th, '08, 21:16

Well, at $99 a cake I don't think it would be financially wise to get your hopes up... I believe that at that price, it better be good!

Did you like it?


Yes. The other shengs that I tasted all tasted way too similar to each other and seemed like they would only be worth drinking in order to see what potential they had. On the other hand, this particular sample had what I always wanted from shu, without the blatant yuckiness.

In short I would say this Dayi Yiwu was somewhere in the sweet spot between a shu and a sheng, maybe slightly closer to the shu side of things. I would definitely be interested in teas like this if I could find them at a reasonable price. I guess that's why people buy young!
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