Menghai reccomendations


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Menghai reccomendations

Postby Jeremy » Oct 30th, '08, 23:33

What are the essentials to have from Menghai factory for young and old sheng?

I have heard the 2005 peacock is good. Can anyone recommend?
Also whats the deal with the recipe numbers? I understand the code, but is a 2006 7532 supposed to taste the same as a 2007 when it is new?


Thanks
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Postby thanks » Oct 31st, '08, 01:17

That's the point of the recipes, to maintain a quality consistency through blending techniques. You'll hear different opinions on what are "must own" recipes, but I think the most universal recommendations are the 7542, the 8582, and in my opinion, the 7532. Not everyone will agree with 7532 as it's hard to find a good aged example of it in the west, but the few different batches I've had (801, 701, and one from 99) have all been excellent. In my opinion out of these, the only one that's absolutely strictly an "ager" is the 8582, as I don't care for the taste of it new at all. However it's delicious when aged properly. I don't really drink young sheng regularly except for samples anyway, but for those of you interested in a "drink now" tea, better can be had than the 8582 at a similar price I bet. Try to stick to the first batch cakes such as 801, 701, etc. as these use blended semi-aged tea either a year old, or a combination of one and two year old maocha (loose pu'er). They also use higher quality leaf for these productions as well.

As far as teas like the Peacock series, because these are not blended, then I'm guessing that their taste can vary greatly year to year. I've yet to try any of this years, and I've only had the chance of sampling and owning a solitary cake of the 05 Mengsong which I absolutely love (but is unfortunately no longer available for now), so I couldn't tell you if this years is worth it or not, or if my theory is correct. I will tell you that the Dayi Hong is worth it's price, as is the Silver Dayi releases of this year. The Silver Dayi is a rough, ragged, and wild tea, but when handled with care brings about an excellent rounded flavor profile, and later infusions prove to be deliciously sweet tobacco. My first session with this tea was absolutely awful, but the three after that proved absolutely excellent. The Dayi Hong is one of the best smelling teas I've had in the pu'er world at such a young age, made from Mengsong and Nannuo leaves it is an excellent tea. Strong, vibrant, yet later infusions boasting a mellow smooth rounded flavor. First few infusions show the Mengsong leaves fighting slightly with the Nannuo, but in a good way, and in the middle to end they blend together wonderfully.
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Postby Trioxin » Oct 31st, '08, 01:44

I'm currently drinking the Dayi Hong. Can't say it better than thanks just did. Its a very nice tea especially when considering the price. I'll maybe have to pick up a couple of more.
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Postby hop_goblin » Oct 31st, '08, 08:41

MengHai Dayi or Factory, I would recommend any of the older recipes. If they have been around, that means they are going to be around for a reason.. But yes, Thanks is correct. However, I would also buy first editions or first year recipes for example, in 06 I purchased a number of the 0622. ...You never know if these will become a great vintage plus just like books first editions are worth more.
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Postby thanks » Oct 31st, '08, 09:12

hop_goblin wrote:MengHai Dayi or Factory, I would recommend any of the older recipes. If they have been around, that means they are going to be around for a reason.. But yes, Thanks is correct. However, I would also buy first editions or first year recipes for example, in 06 I purchased a number of the 0622. ...You never know if these will become a great vintage plus just like books first editions are worth more.


This is also a good point. The 0622 is developed around the famous 92 fangcha recipe, and the 7532. It seems like a "can't miss" in my book. Dayi usually knows what they're doing.
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Postby shogun89 » Oct 31st, '08, 10:06

As I am sure you have seen me say before, you cant go wrong with the 2008 8582!
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Postby Jeremy » Oct 31st, '08, 10:21

What is Dayi? Isnt that just a brand label of Menghai?
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Postby Jeremy » Oct 31st, '08, 10:27

Also how can you tell what the batch numbers are?
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Postby thanks » Oct 31st, '08, 10:41

Jeremy wrote:What is Dayi? Isnt that just a brand label of Menghai?


Yes, 大益 (literally Great Benefit) is a brand of pu'er from the Menghai factory, but it's easier to say Dayi than Menghai as there are several "Menghai" labels out there. I haven't seen a release from the Menghai factory in a while that wasn't Dayi, so it's just a more specific way of saying Menghai.

As for batch numbers, I'm afraid I couldn't give you a super specific explanation, just what I've already typed is what I know. Like I said, usually the first batch of a year (for example first batch of this year, the 801) will usually contain semi-aged tea that is of high quality. The second batch and on (802, 803, etc.) will usually contain tea picked this year that is of slightly lesser quality. The collector interest in first batch productions only is such that you will see a large price increase every year for first batch teas, while second and on barely increase and are actually hard to get rid of. If you want proof just looking at the selection of Menghai Dayi teas from Yunnan Sourcing and Dragon Tea House from 07 to 08, noting batch numbers and price is fascinating. I've never had a second batch or on with recent teas, so I couldn't tell you if there's a huge difference between them.
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Postby taitea » Oct 31st, '08, 10:51

Could someone post all the subdivisions of Menghai? I'm a little confused by all the nomenclature. I thought Menghai was a factory, but that is just one particular branch of the Menghai company?


(Also, repeat the above questions for any of the big pu brands out there...)
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Postby thanks » Oct 31st, '08, 10:56

taitea wrote:Could someone post all the subdivisions of Menghai? I'm a little confused by all the nomenclature. I thought Menghai was a factory, but that is just one particular branch of the Menghai company?


(Also, repeat the above questions for any of the big pu brands out there...)


Basically when all of the pu'er tea factories were becoming privatized in the 90's, Menghai adopted Dayi as a name to show it was no longer a state owned company. That's basically it. Dayi and Menghai can be used separately or together to mean the same thing.

Also this from the Menghai Wikipedia page helps illustrate this concept more clearly.

"Menghai Tea Factory previously produced its teas under the zhōngchá label of the state-run China National Native Produce & Animal by Products Import & Export (CNNP), but registered its own brand, Dayi in June 1989, and began producing exclusively under this label in 1996. While some Menghai labels contain other more prominent labels, such as the Menghai peacock, the Dayi brand is always found on these labels as well."
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Postby Jeremy » Oct 31st, '08, 11:12

The zongcha label has some very prized collectable cakes. I am in the midst of reading clouds book encyclopedia of puerh, this explains alot of the old terminology. But for the new I think it is somewhat lacking.

Oh, BTW, I noticed scott lists the batch numbers on YS.

Thanks guys. I still need some help refining my next order.

Im not sure if i wanna do a big sample order of zixi from houde

Or if i wanna do a barage of samples of the formulas you guys gave from menghai. Sampan has some 94 and 90 versions of the 7542!

Oh the choices! :twisted:
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Postby Jeremy » Oct 31st, '08, 11:14

typo Xi-Zhi from houde
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Postby hop_goblin » Oct 31st, '08, 11:21

Jeremy wrote:The zongcha label has some very prized collectable cakes. I am in the midst of reading clouds book encyclopedia of puerh, this explains alot of the old terminology. But for the new I think it is somewhat lacking.

Oh, BTW, I noticed scott lists the batch numbers on YS.

Thanks guys. I still need some help refining my next order.

Im not sure if i wanna do a big sample order of zixi from houde

Or if i wanna do a barage of samples of the formulas you guys gave from menghai. Sampan has some 94 and 90 versions of the 7542!

Oh the choices! :twisted:


I have tasted a few of Sampan Teas and they were good. In fact, I reviewed the 94 if you are interested.

http://ancientteahorseroad.blogspot.com ... beeng.html
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Postby Salsero » Oct 31st, '08, 12:43

There are so many factories, the biggest are not necessarily the best, and it seems that I hear about a new one every time I turn around! Thanks just mentioned a wonderful sounding Bu Lang cake from Hai Lang Hao, a factory I had never heard of. Oh, and some enterprises aren't factories at all but contract with a factory to produce their products.

I know Mike Petro's site has a list of factories, but it is old, limited in scope, and cumbersome, so it reads almost like a random collection of information.

Is there any way that we could start some kind of annotated list of factories? Or maybe even better, a thread of best factories or interesting factories that our members have experience with? Or biggest factories or favorite factories or factories to avoid.

Maybe it's a poorly conceived idea, but this thread about just Menghai has been enormously helpful for me and I guess I would like to learn more.
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