Yixing pots from a shipwreck.


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Yixing pots from a shipwreck.

Postby cheaton » Nov 6th, '08, 15:36

I wonder if these would really be good for brewing considering they've been soaking up seawater for 150 years....

http://www.mingwrecks.com/sales/yixing.html
User avatar
cheaton
 
Posts: 147
Joined: Aug 12th, '

Postby trallis » Nov 6th, '08, 15:59

if i wasnt in a horrible financial situation right now i'd get one in a second.

i don't think i could ever brew tea in it though.. what an incredible collectors item
User avatar
trallis
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Oct 15th, '

Postby trallis » Nov 6th, '08, 16:03

and by the way wow it looks like they did their homework on yixings, considering they are not tea hobbyists at all, their knowledge is impressive
User avatar
trallis
 
Posts: 55
Joined: Oct 15th, '

Postby shogun89 » Nov 6th, '08, 16:12

There is an article in AOT mag #2 that talks about bringing these pots up from the wreck. Some say they will not be good for brewing as it may produce a rough tea but many experts disagree.
User avatar
shogun89
 
Posts: 1636
Joined: Feb 15th, '
Location: Pennsylvania

Postby Victoria » Nov 6th, '08, 16:46

Wow interesting. I wonder.
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby Salsero » Nov 6th, '08, 16:56

shogun89 wrote: There is an article in AOT mag #2 that talks about bringing these pots up from the wreck.
Wow, General, you are turning into a resident expert! Thanks.
User avatar
Salsero
 
Posts: 5214
Joined: Dec 21st, '
Location: Gainesville, Florida

Postby heavydoom » Nov 6th, '08, 17:15

question : since the pots and the lids were strewn all over the place, i presume, how would they know what lid would fit which pot of similar shape? some to me, based on the pics, look to me that they had the wrong lid on them.

also, the salt water must have affected the physical/chemical nature of the clay after all these years.
User avatar
heavydoom
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Jun 1st, '0
Location: The Golden Horseshoe

Postby shogun89 » Nov 6th, '08, 17:27

heavydoom wrote:question : since the pots and the lids were strewn all over the place, i presume, how would they know what lid would fit which pot of similar shape? some to me, based on the pics, look to me that they had the wrong lid on them.

also, the salt water must have affected the physical/chemical nature of the clay after all these years.


Thanks Sal, Its the one reading that I actually do. And Heavy, the pots lids would most likely not be thrown about because when the pots where packed for the trip they where all put together in pots with natural padding between them like grass or something so though the grass would have decomposed the lids would most likely have stayed with their pots. But not to say the pots could have goten mismatched during the salvage.
Last edited by shogun89 on Nov 6th, '08, 18:39, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
shogun89
 
Posts: 1636
Joined: Feb 15th, '
Location: Pennsylvania

Postby Drax » Nov 6th, '08, 18:09

I saw this too, but thought I'd just go w/ something a bit more normal :D

I wouldn't be too worried about the salt water affecting the pots. I'm not a master of material science, but I can't imagine what the water would be doing to the clay. Especially since we're probably talking about pretty cold water, being at the bottom of the ocean.

At least, nothing different than decades of brewing tea in it wouldn't do. If anything, some salt may have gotten embedded into the pots and maybe it would take a couple brews (or soaking in unsalted water) to get rid of it. But... other than that...?
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2554
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Postby shogun89 » Nov 6th, '08, 18:35

The pots are cleaned when they come up using (I think) a electrolysis and a saline solution.
User avatar
shogun89
 
Posts: 1636
Joined: Feb 15th, '
Location: Pennsylvania

Postby hop_goblin » Nov 6th, '08, 18:56

I have read that some believe they never make good tea.
User avatar
hop_goblin
 
Posts: 1949
Joined: May 22nd, '
Location: Trapped inside a bamboo tong!

Postby betta » Nov 7th, '08, 16:19

Logically, brine composed mainly of sodium salt and sodium is one of elements with the smallest molecule size. So basically it can penetrate anything if it is given enough time (especially over years). I think the taste of brewed tea in those pots will be somewhat "weird" at the beginning of the usage due to this.
Theoretically it is possible to get rid of these mineralisation (precipitation and crystallisation of salt) effect. What the archaelog cleaned there is only the outer surface, but what remained in the micropore of the pot requires intensive cleaning and patience.
User avatar
betta
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Jan 30th, '

Postby hop_goblin » Nov 8th, '08, 00:33

betta wrote:Logically, brine composed mainly of sodium salt and sodium is one of elements with the smallest molecule size. So basically it can penetrate anything if it is given enough time (especially over years). I think the taste of brewed tea in those pots will be somewhat "weird" at the beginning of the usage due to this.
Theoretically it is possible to get rid of these mineralisation (precipitation and crystallisation of salt) effect. What the archaelog cleaned there is only the outer surface, but what remained in the micropore of the pot requires intensive cleaning and patience.


Thanks for the analysis! Great!
User avatar
hop_goblin
 
Posts: 1949
Joined: May 22nd, '
Location: Trapped inside a bamboo tong!

Postby Drax » Nov 8th, '08, 09:49

hop_goblin wrote:Thanks for the analysis! Great!


I don't agree. I could write several pages explaining the principles of dissolving ionic solids and reversible crystal formation, but I don't think anybody really cares about that stuff.

Bottom line for me is that $320-$800 is a lot to pay for a pot, even if it's 150 years old. I'm sure plenty of antique collectors are drooling over the possibilities, whether they would brew tea in it or not.
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2554
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Postby betta » Nov 8th, '08, 10:58

Drax wrote:
hop_goblin wrote:Thanks for the analysis! Great!


I don't agree. I could write several pages explaining the principles of dissolving ionic solids and reversible crystal formation, but I don't think anybody really cares about that stuff.

Bottom line for me is that $320-$800 is a lot to pay for a pot, even if it's 150 years old. I'm sure plenty of antique collectors are drooling over the possibilities, whether they would brew tea in it or not.


I don't know exactly what the collector after from these pots. I hope kyleshen in this forum could help us with this part; he's the expert.

Dissolving ionic solids and reversing crystal formation could be done easily. That's what we learn in highschool. However I hope you'd take into account the capillary effect in the deposition. A capillary condensation (and thus also deposition) will create hysteresis, not all of the deposited molecule could be easily removed out of pores. Otherwise we don't have to replace any adsorbent after some TON.
User avatar
betta
 
Posts: 521
Joined: Jan 30th, '

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation