Genmaicha without the cha?


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Genmaicha without the cha?

Postby teaguru » Nov 10th, '08, 16:42

One of my favourite teas is genmaicha. I just love that wonderful popcorn taste. My father enjoys it too, but he asked me the other day if it was possible to get genmaicha without the sencha. I'd try roasting my own, but I doubt it'll taste the same...

Does anyone know where I could buy a bag of the roasted rice that's used in genmaicha?
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Postby Chip » Nov 10th, '08, 23:52

If you wan UnCha Genmai, break out a fry pan and some long grain rice. It is not hard to make genmai and it makes it taste that much better. Heat the pan up on high and put some rice in. Stay close by so you do not scorch the rice. Might take some practice, but it is not rocket science. You can then try different rices and roasts.

While you are at it get some barley and make some home made mugicha, delicious!

Both of these are very blendable with various Japanese teas.

Have fun! :D
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Postby teaguru » Nov 12th, '08, 17:08

I tried roasting some rice last night, and while it turned out quite brown, I didn't get the flavourful, blubbly looking rice that tpyical comes in the traditional genmai cha.

I'm thinking that I'm using the wrong kind of rice. I just pulled out some No Name brown rice from the cupboard and tossed it in the pan, but is there a specific type that traditionally used when roasting rice for genmai cha?
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Postby Pentox » Nov 12th, '08, 18:11

Huh, interesting that you would say to use long grain rice Chip. Japanese rice is exclusively short grain I believe.

I believe that genmai uses regular short grain Japanese rice. While true Japanese rice is very expensive and hard to get, California Calrose rice is much more cost effective and a decently close version to the Japanese rice.
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Postby Chip » Nov 12th, '08, 19:29

Actually, long or short ... I don't think that makes a difference. Sarah has been doing this longer, hopefully she will post.
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Postby kymidwife » Nov 12th, '08, 23:24

I've roasted several different types of rice so far, all with similar results. I will say that none of my rice looks exactly like what I've seen in genmaicha I've purchased, and I think that's more due to roasting techniques than to the rice itself.

Some of my experiences so far have been:

- Stovetop worked better than oven roasting

-Initially high temp to get started, then reduce heat to a medium to high-medium or the rice will burn

-I've used hard anozide nonstick and an iron skillet... both work but the nonstick gave the nicest browning

-Short grain and long grain seem to brown the same and taste the same

-Mixed long-grain wild with the dark grains mixed in will burn more easily than plain white rice... was very tasty but I had to watch it like a hawk during roasting

-Some of the grains of rice will "puff" similar to popcorn, which I find visually appealing in the finished product. and is also tasty to eat just after roasting

-If you want a really bold coffee-like taste, you want to roast your rice (or barley if you're doing mugicha) until it's on the verge of being scorched

-When you brew, alittle grain goes a long way... brews best for me if I use a tablespoon or two of medium-roast grain with a cup of boiling water in a larger ~ 6 cup decanter... let it steep until it starts to cool, then fill to the top with cool water and refrigerate until cold. The first infusion will be the strongest, and if too strong, just cut back on amount of grain the next time. Every time you pour a cup/glass out of the decanter, refill to the top with fresh water. I get at least 4 days of use with one batch of grains, and have continued it as long as 7 days with no deterioration. It gives lots of mileage!

Hope this helps...

Sarah
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Postby Chip » Nov 12th, '08, 23:29

Thanx a bunch, Sarah. I am still in the early stages of genmai firing. I want to get a few different typpes of rice, mainly for visuals. I have a brown that colors the water reddish, pretty intense. :oops: 8)

But the mugicha experiments are going great!
Last edited by Chip on Nov 13th, '08, 01:19, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby kymidwife » Nov 12th, '08, 23:35

Chip... keep me posted on your experiments. So far, I've just used rice I already had on hand, so I will use your feedback when its time to buy more.

I like the visuals of this stuff almost as much as the aroma and flavor. The dry grain looks great in my cannister, especially with the variegated textures of wild rice, short grain, and barley all together... and I think the swollen grains in the clear glass decanter in my fridge are interesting and pretty too... and the color of the infused liquer... luckily, I also like to drink it. LOL :lol:

Sarah
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Postby Chip » Nov 13th, '08, 01:22

kymidwife wrote:Chip... keep me posted on your experiments. So far, I've just used rice I already had on hand, so I will use your feedback when its time to buy more.

I like the visuals of this stuff almost as much as the aroma and flavor. The dry grain looks great in my cannister, especially with the variegated textures of wild rice, short grain, and barley all together... and I think the swollen grains in the clear glass decanter in my fridge are interesting and pretty too... and the color of the infused liquer... luckily, I also like to drink it. LOL :lol:

Sarah


And you do the same. The weird thing is, I have two bags of unopened genmaicha in the TeaFridge where they have been since Spring, both given to me by vendors. I am not motivated to open them, I am having too much fun going the rarely traveled route of making my own. It is a blast and I swear it tastes better for several reasons.

I need to get to an Asian store and pick up an assortment of rice.
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Postby teaguru » Nov 13th, '08, 16:44

Oh wow! Thanks so much for your help!

You said that you haven't gotten results like the genmaicha that you purchase. Does anyone know how they traditionally roast the rice? I'd love to try and get the nice brown bubbly stuff. It's just so yummy!

Also, do you think it's possible to turn roasted rice into a flour? It'd be really neat to try and cook with it!
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Postby kymidwife » Nov 13th, '08, 17:03

To be honest, I haven't had enough patience to slow-roast rice or barley in the oven... but I suspect a nice slow roast might produce more of the puffy rice you are seeking. I need to give that a try, but I am such an instant-gratification-seeker, I always just brown it on the stovetop. It tastes better to me than traditional genmaicha, so I haven't tinkered with the technique too much.

Let us know how your experiments turn out!

Sarah
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Postby battra » Nov 14th, '08, 04:22

Here is a recipe for making your own genmaicha (in japanese):
http://cookpad.com/recipe/191059
(Basically, they are just roasting brown rice in a frypan.)

According to wikipedia, they use to make a drnk from only roasted rice in Korea:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyeonmi_cha
and prepared roasted rice should be available in Korean grocery stores.
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Postby Chip » Nov 14th, '08, 09:46

Very interesting, Battra! I usually rinse rice before cooking, they do it before firing as well which makes some sense. The water would quickly evaporate while firing. The first steep of mugicha is a little murky, I guess I should try rinsing that and see what happens.

Heh, having Korean friends, "tea" is rarely tea at their house. :lol:
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Postby Abracadaver! » Nov 14th, '08, 15:16

If you want to be lazy (like me) and just buy the rice already toasted, Seven Cups should have it. I'm not sure if it's on their website, but I've bought it at their teahouse, so I bet if you just ask they will sell you some.
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Postby teaguru » Nov 14th, '08, 16:40

Abracadaver! wrote:If you want to be lazy (like me) and just buy the rice already toasted, Seven Cups should have it. I'm not sure if it's on their website, but I've bought it at their teahouse, so I bet if you just ask they will sell you some.


Good sir, you have me greatly intrigued. Is this the same rice that is used in Genmai Cha? Or is it different?

Thanks!
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