Best Way to make Yunnan Gold??


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Best Way to make Yunnan Gold??

Postby Emoney » Jan 17th, '06, 01:12

I'm new to loose leaf teas. FedEx just dropped off my ingenuiTea, Black Savant Tea sampler, and Green Tea sampler packages from Adagio. Since I'm a coffee drinker, I should like the black teas a lot, right?

I tried the Yunnan Gold, and even though I saw the temperature and steep time on the tin it came in, I didn't see any info on how much loose tea I should spoon in for each cup of water. I nearly boiled water and sifted half of the sampler tin in the ingenuiTea and poured the water over it. I let it steep for 5 minutes, but I think it was too long, or maybe I put in too much tea. It was pretty stout.

Instead of endless experimentation, I thought that someone on this forum would know how to make a great cup of black tea. So, what is the formula I use, and does it change for each type of tea (black, green or white etc.)?

Thanks in advance.
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Tea

Postby Snow on Cedar » Jan 17th, '06, 03:12

Yes, it does change by tea type.

You have the 16 oz (smaller) IngenuiTEA I suppose? If so, then you used WAY too much tea...that sample tin should make you about 10 cups of tea! Here is Adagio's guidelines:

black teas
taste best when prepared with boiling water, and steeped for five minutes. Recommended ratio is one teaspoon of leaves per cup of water. The only black tea that deviates from this rule is our Darjeeling Symphony no. 1. This is a delicate First Flush tea that grows high along the slopes of the Himalayas. This tea will taste best when prepared with cooler water (180F) and steeped for three minutes.

green teas
taste best when prepared with water that is cooler-than-boiling (180F) and steeped for three minutes. Recommended ratio is one teaspoon per cup of water for the relatively heavy Japanese greens (Sencha) and slightly more for the light Chinese greens (Pi Lo Chun). Remember to use cooler-than-boiling water. Otherwise your tea will taste bitter. If using a kettle, water is ideal when it begins to emit a 'rumble' sound. If using a microwave, look for the tiny air bubbles forming. These are good signs that your water is ready.

In the future, if you decide to order other types of teas, refer to http://www.adagio.com/info/preparation.html for additional info on your teas...

Enjoy!
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Yunnan Gold steep time

Postby jashnew » Feb 3rd, '06, 12:54

I'm a big fan of Yunnan Gold. Its hands down my favorite tea. I have ordered it from several tea sites and Adagio has some of the best. I truly feel that 5 minutes is way too long for a high quality black tea like Yunnan Gold. 3-4 minutes is long enough. When a black tea hits that 5 minute mark it can become too bitter and loose its sweetness. You know you made a good cup of Yunnan Gold when it taste peppery and sweet. It should also have a clean aftertaste. My advice is try steeping it for 3 minutes, 4 minutes, and then 5 minutes and see what you like best.
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Postby TeaFanatic » Feb 18th, '06, 01:14

LadyArden wrote: Typical things that make tea bitter: Using too much tea and letting the leaves steep too long. So maybe use less, and only let it steep as long as it says on the tin.


I have never understood why using too much tea makes tea bitter. Can anyone explain why this is the case? Wouldn't that mean that using twice as many tea leaves for iced tea would make the iced tea bitter? I'm confused...
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Postby Joe » Feb 18th, '06, 10:21

Agreeing with jashnew on lowering the steeping time. Except i go even less to 2-3 minutes. But then again, that's coming from some one who's darkest tea besides yunnan gold is pouchong.
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Postby Warden Andy » Mar 17th, '06, 22:15

TeaFanatic wrote:
LadyArden wrote: Typical things that make tea bitter: Using too much tea and letting the leaves steep too long. So maybe use less, and only let it steep as long as it says on the tin.


I have never understood why using too much tea makes tea bitter. Can anyone explain why this is the case? Wouldn't that mean that using twice as many tea leaves for iced tea would make the iced tea bitter? I'm confused...


If you lower the brewing time with more tea leaves, it won't make it bitter. If it did make it bitter, Gongfu brewing would be much different. But they are talking about more leaves and the same brewing time. I think the reason it becomes bitter is because more tannins would be released into the water with more leaves and a longer brewing time.
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Postby MarshalN » Mar 19th, '06, 23:56

TeaFanatic wrote:
LadyArden wrote: Typical things that make tea bitter: Using too much tea and letting the leaves steep too long. So maybe use less, and only let it steep as long as it says on the tin.


I have never understood why using too much tea makes tea bitter. Can anyone explain why this is the case? Wouldn't that mean that using twice as many tea leaves for iced tea would make the iced tea bitter? I'm confused...


All teas are bitter (caffeine is bitter) and when the tea is properly brewed, the slight bitterness is part of the taste. When you add too much tea, then the bitterness becomes the overpowering taste in the tea. Just lower steeping time if you add more leaves.

I brew black tea gong-fu style (as I do all teas) and steep it for only about 5 seconds the first brew, maybe 10 seconds for the second brew, etc.
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Yunnan Gold, Temperature, Time

Postby jonsinger » Mar 23rd, '06, 14:19

Like a few of the other responders, I have to disagree with Snow on Cedar. My sweetie and I have consistenly found that Yunnan Gold wants to be brewed with water at 200 degrees F, for about 3 and a half minutes. Hotter water gives a flavor that isn't as nice; brewing it much longer, even at 200, makes it bitter. Adjust the amount of leaf to suit your taste. (I like it stronger than most people seem to.) I don't bother to boil the water and cool it back down, but that seems to be a common practice.

You can, no surprise, reduce the temperature and increase the time. I've brewed Yunnan overnight in water at room temperature, for example, with fairly reasonable results.

The highest grade of Yunnan Gold (occasionally available from imperialtea.com) is a different animal; brew it in a Yixing pot or a gaiwan, and be prepared to practice a lot before you get it right. Brew it the ordinary way, and it just won't measure up. (Voice of experience speaking here.)

Cheers --
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Postby yresim » Mar 23rd, '06, 18:30

How odd that so many people have found this tea bitter when brewed for 5 minutes.

I've been steeping 1 tsp/cup at 212 for 5 minutes, and I haven't found one single trace of even the slightest bitterness. It tastes very malty, like black pepper without the kick, and is extremely strong, but also extremely smooth.

Which is why I've enjoyed it so much.

Perhaps it is a matter of different water quality or something...

~Yresim~
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Postby marz910 » Mar 23rd, '06, 20:29

I find it to be very smooth and brew it for 4mins. at 180-212 temp. with between 1-2 tsp per 10-12 ozs cup.
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Using the ingenuiTea

Postby teame » May 9th, '06, 22:59

The temperature at which you can steep tea with the ingenuiTea can vary greatly depending on how long you boil the water. If you pull it out of the microwave shortly after water starts to boil, the temperature will be around 185-190 degrees (at sea level) when you insert the thermometer. It takes about 20 seconds of a hard boil to get the water up near 212.

Try your teas at both ends of this range and see which one suits your tastes best!
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