Can a white tea be too old.


White and yellow teas are among the most subtle.

Can a white tea be too old.

Postby J. » Jan 31st, '09, 09:26

A few months ago, I've bought 4 tea flowers with Yin Zhen.
I infused the first one this morning. After having drinked the tea, I saw the package and it was writed "Best before january 2009!"

So my question is "Are white teas short lived (we can keep it only one year) or were my flowers old?"

Thanks
Jean-Benoît
User avatar
J.
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Jan 22nd, '

Postby Beidao » Jan 31st, '09, 11:21

White tea is not the most short lived, but not the least either. It does not live for as long as black tea.
User avatar
Beidao
 
Posts: 524
Joined: Apr 10th, '
Location: Sweden

Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '09, 11:36

That is a tough call. It depends on so many factors, but it is likely well past prime.

I am not a fan of the "best by" system. This is very subjective. I prefer to know the actual harvest info and work from there, but that is a discussion for another day ... :D
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby J. » Jan 31st, '09, 12:11

Ok, if I understand well this tea remains consumable but the "expiracy date" could explain a kind of lack of taste.
User avatar
J.
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Jan 22nd, '

Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '09, 12:14

Correct ... maybe, but you generally need to use a lot of leaf for whites since it is so light. You should try more leaf before giving ip on it.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby gingkoseto » Jan 31st, '09, 12:36

Shelf life of white tea is comparable to most high mountain green teas, but it depends on many factors, especially storage conditions.

I agree with Chip that the expiration date doesn't tell much. It seems that many products are labeled in this way with an expiration date unexplainable. A Japanese green tea I got also has the expiration date of Jan. 30, 2010. Normally a tea will be labeled as having 12-18 month shelf life. 12 months is more realistic, but some merchants want to label it longer. Both white tea and Japanese green tea are produced in spring. Either 12 or 18 months, I don't understand why they expire in a January. But I guess, a tea expiring in Jan. 2009 was produced in spring 2007, and a tea expiring in Jan. 2010 was produced in spring 2008
User avatar
gingkoseto
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24th, '
Location: Boston, MA

Postby Shelob » Jan 31st, '09, 13:05

Chip wrote:That is a tough call. It depends on so many factors, but it is likely well past prime. :D


Silver Needles from our host Adagio is an excellent selection for white tea 8)
The leaves are gorgeous, very fluffy and the liquor is delightful. It has always been 'fresh tasting' to me. Why not try it, you won't be disappointed :!: :wink:
User avatar
Shelob
 
Posts: 475
Joined: Sep 29th, '
Location: Floating blissfully in a bowl of Matcha

Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '09, 13:43

gingko wrote:Shelf life of white tea is comparable to most high mountain green teas, but it depends on many factors, especially storage conditions.

I agree with Chip that the expiration date doesn't tell much. It seems that many products are labeled in this way with an expiration date unexplainable. A Japanese green tea I got also has the expiration date of Jan. 30, 2010. Normally a tea will be labeled as having 12-18 month shelf life. 12 months is more realistic, but some merchants want to label it longer. Both white tea and Japanese green tea are produced in spring. Either 12 or 18 months, I don't understand why they expire in a January. But I guess, a tea expiring in Jan. 2009 was produced in spring 2007, and a tea expiring in Jan. 2010 was produced in spring 2008

OK, the current system just ... ummm, sucks, IMAO. Your points are all valid, Gingko, and I could add about a dozen more. :roll:
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby Victoria » Jan 31st, '09, 14:34

I guess in your case it would be hard to tell if you haven't tried them before. When you have tried or own the bag, you can tell when it is getting old. I don't go by those dates for most dry goods anyway. If may be "best" or "better by" but it still may be good.

I would try Chip's suggesting of add more leaf. If you are not happy with it then,
toss it. You might try contacting the vendor - they might surprise you and replace the bag.

Good luck!
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby olivierco » Jan 31st, '09, 15:05

I think that Ippodo has the shortest "best before" dates: 120 days for matcha and 150 days for sencha, bancha and gyokuro.
They also recommend that the tea should be consumed within two weeks after opening the package.

More informations here
User avatar
olivierco
 
Posts: 3375
Joined: Feb 8th, '0
Location: France

Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '09, 15:07

olivierco wrote:I think that Ippodo has the shortest "best before" dates: 120 days for matcha and 150 days for sencha, bancha and gyokuro.
They also recommend that the tea should be consumed within two weeks after opening the package.

More informations here


Ippodo does NOT nitro flush, thus the short shelf life. :cry:
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby olivierco » Jan 31st, '09, 15:16

Chip wrote:
olivierco wrote:I think that Ippodo has the shortest "best before" dates: 120 days for matcha and 150 days for sencha, bancha and gyokuro.
They also recommend that the tea should be consumed within two weeks after opening the package.

More informations here


Ippodo does NOT nitro flush, thus the short shelf life. :cry:



They add some oxygen absorbers to their tea.
Many other shops don't and nevertheless give "best before" dates of over one year.
User avatar
olivierco
 
Posts: 3375
Joined: Feb 8th, '0
Location: France

Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '09, 17:16

olivierco wrote:
Chip wrote:
olivierco wrote:I think that Ippodo has the shortest "best before" dates: 120 days for matcha and 150 days for sencha, bancha and gyokuro.
They also recommend that the tea should be consumed within two weeks after opening the package.

More informations here


Ippodo does NOT nitro flush, thus the short shelf life. :cry:



They add some oxygen absorbers to their tea.
Many other shops don't and nevertheless give "best before" dates of over one year.

...which seems too long considering.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby J. » Feb 1st, '09, 17:07

Chip wrote:Correct ... maybe, but you generally need to use a lot of leaf for whites since it is so light. You should try more leaf before giving ip on it.


I was speaking about "flowers" made with tea.
I had 4 and during this weekend it drunk 2 with my family and 2 with friends (one liking green japanese teas, another only earl grey in bags and two others knowing nothing about tea).
So well, white teas are light but really subtle. The one I tried had a real apricot flavour.


About japanese teas, I only buy some in september hoping it's the latest harvest (sencha from july).

Thanks for the answers, you confirmed what I tought.
User avatar
J.
 
Posts: 80
Joined: Jan 22nd, '

Postby Chip » Feb 1st, '09, 17:26

Oh, the flowers, they can be inferior quality tea anyway. I did have the Adagio flower and it was better ...
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22177
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation