Brewing Darjeeling Black Tea

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.

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Mar 29th 15 2:47 am
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Re: Brewing Darjeeling Black Tea

by Tead Off » Mar 29th 15 2:47 am

Drax wrote:Ahhh, thanks, I see. It's true, I never paid much attention to teas from Darjeeling. I thought they were usually on the high end of the oxidation scale. Good to know it's otherwise!
I"m a little surprised you weren't familiar with Darjeelings. They are some of the best teas!

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Mar 29th 15 3:17 pm
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Re: Brewing Darjeeling Black Tea

by Drax » Mar 29th 15 3:17 pm

Tead Off wrote:
Drax wrote:Ahhh, thanks, I see. It's true, I never paid much attention to teas from Darjeeling. I thought they were usually on the high end of the oxidation scale. Good to know it's otherwise!
I"m a little surprised you weren't familiar with Darjeelings. They are some of the best teas!
Definitely a misconception on my part... and from the sounds of it, one that will a pleasure to rectify! :mrgreen:

Feb 12th 19 10:27 pm
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Re: Brewing Darjeeling Black Tea

by laraz » Feb 12th 19 10:27 pm

I heard once that first flush Darjeelings are really not blacks, as they're semi-oxidized (looking at the ones i just bought I can confirm that they look greenish), and that doing them gong-fu (or chinese style) would give really nice results. Autumn Darjeelings are more robust and closer to your usual black tea, so I assume gong fu would bring out a lot of astringency and bitterness. I will try gong fu on my new spring darjeeling and report back.
I also bought an autumn Nepali black (Jun Chiyabari) that also looked semi-oxidized, and after preparing it western and loving it, I looked up their website, and they actually recommended chinese style. Nepali teas are usually closer to Darjeeling, but this particular garden are setting themselves apart.