Pu-Erh Mint

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.


Apr 8th, '06, 13:42
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Location: San Francisco, CA
Contact: kodama

Pu-Erh Mint

by kodama » Apr 8th, '06, 13:42

I found that on its own (especially as an evening thing) my cooked Yunnan Tuocha Pu-Erh goes well 2:1 with dried mint. Smooth like pu-erh and with a slightly lighter flavor. I love it.

The one catch - the mint tea is only good for two steepings before it looses its flavor, the pu-erh can do at least 7, so the mint wears off.

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Apr 14th, '06, 17:06
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Location: Portland, OR
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by illium » Apr 14th, '06, 17:06

Dried Chrysanthemum flower is traditionally used to balance the flavours of black and pu er teas. They last much longer than mint will!

Apr 14th, '06, 17:56
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by kodama » Apr 14th, '06, 17:56

Great! I just bought some.

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Apr 17th, '06, 22:04
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by jogrebe » Apr 17th, '06, 22:04

Just add more mint once it looses its flavor if you like mint puerh, the old mint leaves won't cause any harm, they'll just take up space.

Apr 18th, '06, 00:34
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by kodama » Apr 18th, '06, 00:34

I use a small yixing - so a single Crys. bud wipes out the pu-erh flavor. Not my thing.

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Apr 23rd, '06, 05:31
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by illium » Apr 23rd, '06, 05:31

haha they are powerful little flowers.. usually you would only use them in a larger pot, and only a single bud or two tops. in an small yixing.. you could try breaking them down into hald buds or something of that nature.. another option would be to hold them in a strainer, and pour the brewed pu er through the flowers, only giving them an instant to brew into the flavour.. might be just the right touch to set the balance!

you could also try some wolfberry. (the little red rasin looking things that generally accompany chrysanthemum and rock sugar in a chinese tea pot)..

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