Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.


Oct 31st, '15, 10:25
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Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by alix » Oct 31st, '15, 10:25

Do you know yuchi wild from Taiwan? it's mi favourite!!!

I found only from Taiwan tea craft shop....do you know other??????

Oct 31st, '15, 16:56
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by Alucard » Oct 31st, '15, 16:56

Wild Elephant from Taiwan Sourcing. I have not done a side-by-side comparison and have not had Yuchi in several months, drank wild elephant today.

http://taiwanoolongs.com/collections/20 ... pring-2015

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Nov 2nd, '15, 13:07
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by hopeofdawn » Nov 2nd, '15, 13:07

It's a favorite of mine as well--I've never tasted anything else quite like it.

Nov 9th, '15, 17:32
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by alix » Nov 9th, '15, 17:32

sun moon lake = yuchi wild?????

Nov 9th, '15, 19:04
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by Alucard » Nov 9th, '15, 19:04

alix wrote:sun moon lake = yuchi wild?????
Are you referring to the area or a tea? Some refer Ruby #18 tea as sun moon lake.

Yuchi might be grown in that area. You'll need to check with the vendor.

Nov 10th, '15, 02:20
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by alix » Nov 10th, '15, 02:20

No...i think the same taste?

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Nov 10th, '15, 02:58
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by 茶藝-TeaArt08 » Nov 10th, '15, 02:58

Just to clarify...

Yuchi is a short hop from Sun Moon Lake...but Sun Moon Lake definitely does not equal "Yuchi Wild."

There are various teas referred to under the name Taiwan Wild Tea. Sometimes this refers to formerly, but no longer, cultivated wild bushes of either Japanese colonial Assam tea trees that have grown untended or to other untended wild black tea trees of the #18 Hong Yu/紅玉(Red Jade) or the #21 Hong Yun/紅韻(Red Rhyme).

Both Hong Yu and Hong Yun are teas originating from the T.R.E.S. in Taiwan and one even has to buy their seedlings from official nurseries in order to grow these teas. There is however a true Taiwan wild tea tree strain that is generally referred to as Shan Cha/山茶(Mountain Tea) or sometimes, and more distinctly 紫色芽/zi se ya(Purple Sprout). I have gone on wild tea tree searches in the mountains surrounding Yuchi and with some Betel Nut chewing, ragged tea farmers and found one true Shan Cha tree...and it is very different from the other varieties...noticeably in the leaf. I've even drank a rare rolled wulong tea made from Taiwanese Indigenous Shan Cha, which was not bad; though, I prefer its red tea version.

Shan Cha also varies greatly from the Camellia Sinensis Assamica tea plant and from Camellia Sinensis Sinensis. There is a paper (I will attempt to dig it up and post it here.), a deep study, published on Taiwan indigenous wild tea plants that purports to show that the genetic differentiation of true, indigenous Taiwan wild tea is very distinct from other tea trees, even more distinct than Sinensis is from Assamica...hinting there may be a "Camellia Sinensis Formosensis" strain. This is noted in the flavor profiles of these teas. TTC's (Philip's) Shan Cha is truly of the Taiwan wild tea tree varietal and has a distinct flavor profile from other Taiwanese red teas. Genuine Shan Cha is even still very little known and not drunk often even in Taiwanese domestic market or Chayi/茶藝 tea circles. Though its popularity is growing. I sell Taiwanese Shan Cha from our private tea room and people always remark on the difference of Shan Cha from #8, #18, and #21 red tea tree strains. It is an accessible, rich, and pleasantly sweet tea that can have sugars occurring almost like the sweet in candied yams with a full-bodied mouthfeel and a clean and warming chaqi/茶氣. Shan Cha noticeably differs from #18 in that it lacks the notable dark cherry or currant fruit notes and differs from #21 in that it lacks the peppery pop of #21 red tea. Shan Cha is also, generally speaking, noticeably different from the #8 Assam strain in its sweetness.

Blessings!

Nov 10th, '15, 07:48
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by thirst » Nov 10th, '15, 07:48

Is this really either wild rather than brought to Taiwan and forgotten or a Camellia sinensis variety rather than something else? I thought tea was indigenous to around the Yunnan-Myanmar-Tibet border region and was spread from there, this seems quite far away.

Nov 11th, '15, 07:28
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by alix » Nov 11th, '15, 07:28

茶藝-TeaArt08 wrote:Just to clarify...

Yuchi is a short hop from Sun Moon Lake...but Sun Moon Lake definitely does not equal "Yuchi Wild."

There are various teas referred to under the name Taiwan Wild Tea. Sometimes this refers to formerly, but no longer, cultivated wild bushes of either Japanese colonial Assam tea trees that have grown untended or to other untended wild black tea trees of the #18 Hong Yu/紅玉(Red Jade) or the #21 Hong Yun/紅韻(Red Rhyme).

Both Hong Yu and Hong Yun are teas originating from the T.R.E.S. in Taiwan and one even has to buy their seedlings from official nurseries in order to grow these teas. There is however a true Taiwan wild tea tree strain that is generally referred to as Shan Cha/山茶(Mountain Tea) or sometimes, and more distinctly 紫色芽/zi se ya(Purple Sprout). I have gone on wild tea tree searches in the mountains surrounding Yuchi and with some Betel Nut chewing, ragged tea farmers and found one true Shan Cha tree...and it is very different from the other varieties...noticeably in the leaf. I've even drank a rare rolled wulong tea made from Taiwanese Indigenous Shan Cha, which was not bad; though, I prefer its red tea version.

Shan Cha also varies greatly from the Camellia Sinensis Assamica tea plant and from Camellia Sinensis Sinensis. There is a paper (I will attempt to dig it up and post it here.), a deep study, published on Taiwan indigenous wild tea plants that purports to show that the genetic differentiation of true, indigenous Taiwan wild tea is very distinct from other tea trees, even more distinct than Sinensis is from Assamica...hinting there may be a "Camellia Sinensis Formosensis" strain. This is noted in the flavor profiles of these teas. TTC's (Philip's) Shan Cha is truly of the Taiwan wild tea tree varietal and has a distinct flavor profile from other Taiwanese red teas. Genuine Shan Cha is even still very little known and not drunk often even in Taiwanese domestic market or Chayi/茶藝 tea circles. Though its popularity is growing. I sell Taiwanese Shan Cha from our private tea room and people always remark on the difference of Shan Cha from #8, #18, and #21 red tea tree strains. It is an accessible, rich, and pleasantly sweet tea that can have sugars occurring almost like the sweet in candied yams with a full-bodied mouthfeel and a clean and warming chaqi/茶氣. Shan Cha noticeably differs from #18 in that it lacks the notable dark cherry or currant fruit notes and differs from #21 in that it lacks the peppery pop of #21 red tea. Shan Cha is also, generally speaking, noticeably different from the #8 Assam strain in its sweetness.

Blessings!
Interesting!!!! So there are 8, 18, 21 and true wild shan cha?
Do you drink yuchi wild from TTC? I like so much this taste!!! I'm searching other similar!!!
Do you know jing yang Ltd from Taiwan? He produce t-18 organic black tea (buds)...it's Good tea? But the taste, i understand it is different of wild shan cha

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Nov 12th, '15, 21:21
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by 茶藝-TeaArt08 » Nov 12th, '15, 21:21

thirst wrote:Is this really either wild rather than brought to Taiwan and forgotten or a Camellia sinensis variety rather than something else? I thought tea was indigenous to around the Yunnan-Myanmar-Tibet border region and was spread from there, this seems quite far away.
Yeah, it's hard to say. Honestly, Shan Cha is a great tea and it is really not even all that available domestically in Taiwan and/or often drank in Chayi circles...yet. The talk is that Shan Cha is truly an indigenous strain to Taiwan. #18 is a blend of Burmese Assam and Shan Cha from T.R.E.S. When you drink the Burmese strain and the Shan Cha separately and then drink a #18 the connection is very clear. There is a T.R.E.S. tea research station up the way from the matchmaker's temple at Sun Moon Lake.
Interesting!!!! So there are 8, 18, 21 and true wild shan cha?
Do you drink yuchi wild from TTC? I like so much this taste!!! I'm searching other similar!!!
Do you know jing yang Ltd from Taiwan? He produce t-18 organic black tea (buds)...it's Good tea? But the taste, i understand it is different of wild shan cha
In answer to your question...No, #8,#18,#21, and Shan Cha are not the only red teas. There are so many hidden, niche teas in Taiwan in all kinds of unknown terroirs...so it's actually hard to say all that is out there. Even after 15 years, I am constantly surprised.

There is an amazing red tea made organically from the Muzha Tie Guan Yin strain (鐵觀音紅茶) that is one of my favorite Taiwanese red teas. Then there are also the small leaf red teas, usually grown at high elevation and made, generally speaking, from the Qing Xing cultivar (I had a particularly good version of the type of red tea grown at high elevation in the Lishan area). Then there are also the red teas made from the Jin Xuan cultivar, not to mention the mixed-varietal red teas. #8, #18, #21 (though the Shan Cha tree I found was at 1000 feet in Yuchi) are all large leaf varietals that are grown in the lower elevations and have a very distinct characteristic to them when compared to the Jin Xuan and Qing Xin red teas.

Yes, I have had #18 red tea that was produced from the buds and it was a really nice tea. In fact, I just ordered a kilo of young bush, #18 red tea to sell in our tea room.

Blessings!

Nov 15th, '15, 16:17
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by alix » Nov 15th, '15, 16:17

茶藝-TeaArt08 wrote:Just to clarify...

There is a paper (I will attempt to dig it up and post it here.), a deep study, published on Taiwan indigenous wild tea plants that purports to show that the genetic differentiation of true, indigenous Taiwan wild tea is very distinct from other tea trees, even more distinct than Sinensis is from Assamica...hinting there may be a "Camellia Sinensis Formosensis" strain.

Blessings!
Very interesting....I think is important read this paper!
I will attempt to dig it up in teachat

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Nov 19th, '15, 16:12
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by 茶藝-TeaArt08 » Nov 19th, '15, 16:12

Very interesting....I think is important read this paper!
I will attempt to dig it up in teachat
Yeah, I'm still trying to find the paper and will post it here once I have located it!

Blessings!

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Nov 19th, '15, 21:24
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by kyarazen » Nov 19th, '15, 21:24

alix wrote:
Very interesting....I think is important read this paper!
I will attempt to dig it up in teachat
there are some "big tree"/"gushu" tea trees in taiwan, pretty much up north actually. assumed to be sinensis assamica

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Jan 15th, '16, 16:41
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by 135F2 » Jan 15th, '16, 16:41

Could anyone please advise on how to properly store Shan Cha/山茶 black tea? Also, how long can it be stored for before the tea goes stale? Thank you!

Jan 15th, '16, 17:43
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Re: Yuchi wild (Taiwan)

by puyuan » Jan 15th, '16, 17:43

There have been "puerh" bings made of shancha, even. An online store from New Zealand (which I can't locate) had some for sale, but the price was high.

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