Let's talk Nilgiri

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.


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Nov 9th, '08, 16:33
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by geeber1 » Nov 9th, '08, 16:33

V, that was a nice article. I think a field trip is in order!

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Nov 9th, '08, 17:19
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by Victoria » Nov 9th, '08, 17:19

Hehe, that's what I was thinking!
:)

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Nov 9th, '08, 17:40
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by Cinnamon Kitty » Nov 9th, '08, 17:40

That was a fascinating article! Good find. I particularly liked the link to their Flickr page with all the pictures of the tea plantations. Absolutely gorgeous.

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Nov 9th, '08, 18:43
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by caligatia » Nov 9th, '08, 18:43

I've gotta say, the handmade Nilgiri really isn't doing much for me. It's a gorgeous-looking tea, and it tastes fine, but there's nothing about it that makes me crave cups of it. I'm going to try brewing it longer and see what happens, but I suspect this will be going in my "to trade" pile...

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Nov 9th, '08, 19:35
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by geeber1 » Nov 9th, '08, 19:35

Salsero wrote:
geeber1 wrote: Parkside Estate Amber Oolong: This one is comparable to the Glendale Handmade from TeaSource, in fact, I can't tell the difference between them.
It is entirely possible that the vendors source it from the same wholesaler and it actually is the same tea.

********
Oops, my bad, I didn't notice these are different estates. I thought Parkside was vendor. Please ignore my ignorance!

:shock: Sal, I would never put your name and ignorance in the same sentence. You're one of the most knowledgeable people on this forum. :)

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Nov 9th, '08, 19:37
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by geeber1 » Nov 9th, '08, 19:37

caligatia wrote:I've gotta say, the handmade Nilgiri really isn't doing much for me. It's a gorgeous-looking tea, and it tastes fine, but there's nothing about it that makes me crave cups of it. I'm going to try brewing it longer and see what happens, but I suspect this will be going in my "to trade" pile...

Cal, at least you gave something different a try. With so many different varieites of tea out there, you sure can't fall in love with all of them. I might be willing to trade something with when you get to that point. (hint, hint)

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Nov 9th, '08, 19:44
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by geeber1 » Nov 9th, '08, 19:44

Victoria wrote:If interested I also found this interesting information on the Nilgiri
Glendale Estate
-

http://www.glendale-tea.com/glendale-estate.html

Fascinating reading I thought, since we own and love their tea.

:)

Wow, I wasn't able to open the image gallery on Firefox and just did in Explorer. What a beautiful place! I loved the train!

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Nov 9th, '08, 21:32
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by Salsero » Nov 9th, '08, 21:32

geeber1 wrote: Wow, I wasn't able to open the image gallery ... What a beautiful place! I loved the train!
I always think of those narrow gauge railroads as part of the English legacy in India, connecting remote parts of the sub-continent, like the train sequences in Ghandi and for that matter in Earth, the second part of Deepa Mehta's great trilogy, Fire, Earth, Water.

Speaking of water, how about those bathrooms!

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Nov 9th, '08, 21:47
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by geeber1 » Nov 9th, '08, 21:47

Yeah, they were pretty nice! There were so many photos of them that I wondered if they were trying to convince us westerners that they actually HAVE bathrooms!

I'm going to have to check out the movies you mentioned.

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Nov 11th, '08, 12:15
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by Victoria » Nov 11th, '08, 12:15

Image

Image

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Nov 11th, '08, 12:16
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by Victoria » Nov 11th, '08, 12:16

Yay post NUMBER 100!!!! This thread is the first to reach 100 posts in Black Tea Forum History! Nilgiri Teas really deserve to be known, as many of these lovlies are
right up there with prized Darjeelings IMHO.

The above pics are clickable!!
This is a beautiful tea and the price is so reasonable!at $3.00 an oz.
But I recommend getting the beautiful tin - 3 oz for $10.00

I am so happy I just restocked!!!

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Nov 11th, '08, 13:03
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by geeber1 » Nov 11th, '08, 13:03

V, great photos! You really captured how lovely this tea is.

And props for making history and being #100! :)

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Nov 11th, '08, 19:48
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by Chip » Nov 11th, '08, 19:48

Happy 100th! Could not have happened to a better topic. Just found my sample of Nilgiri. Now I am looking for my sample from Georgia (not USA).

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Nov 11th, '08, 21:29
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by geeber1 » Nov 11th, '08, 21:29

Right now I'm enjoying a cup of 332 Nilgiri Thiashola TGFOP1 from Specialteas, courtesy of Sarah.

It's very good, bold without being bitter, and has that bit of citrus-y aftertaste that is so great about Nilgiri teas. Thanks, Sarah!

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Nov 11th, '08, 23:36
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by kymidwife » Nov 11th, '08, 23:36

Geeber... glad you are enjoying. After trying a sample of Glendale Handmade, I was shocked at the difference between it and the Thiashola... which is much darker, bolder, and more like a traditional black tea (a very good black tea).. rather than the more Darjeeling/Oolong character of the Glendale. I was worried no one would like mine!

nilgiri insecurity :lol:

Sarah

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