Official Pu of the day

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.


User avatar
Apr 15th, '17, 13:59
Posts: 477
Joined: Aug 19th, '15
Location: on the road

Re: Official Pu of the day

by kuánglóng » Apr 15th, '17, 13:59

Tead Off wrote:
I just returned from Yunnan and drank a lot of tea with a lot of people that know puerh well. These are people with money who have all the connections to get some of the top teas. One guy had a 500g bag of gushu Shincha from Bing Dao. This was maocha, not yet pressed. The wholesale cost of the tea was 4000RMB=about $600 for 1kg. The leaves were absolutely beautiful, unbroken, and big. The taste was delicious.

What impressed me more was the gushu shincha from Menghai. Wow. Such a fruitiness and delight it was in my mouth. Very impressive tea. All the maocha I had there was better than I had ever gotten from any online seller, and for someone who does not like shincha, I was turned around by the quality. Most of these teas were beyond my budget but seeing what was available was eye opening. Unless we pay the price, there is little chance to drink on this level. But in Yunnan, you can find exceptional teas for less than what we pay online sellers, in most cases. Of course, not everyone can go there to buy.

It is rare that you can find unmixed gushu unless you are buying direct from the farmers and have a relationship with them. There is a lot of monkey business in the tea business. The Chinese have a lot of buyers taking the best of the best. Kyarazen's Wuyi articles are very informative about how the tea biz goes.

Another thing that I came face to face with in Kunming was how dry the climate really is. My nose bled for lack of humidity so when faced with buying Kunming stored cakes, dry storage is really dry storage so don't expect much aging to take place.

Also, to my surprise, most drinkers were using about 7g of tea per 100ml, and in the case of Bing Dao shincha, 10g!
Lovely story J. ... makes me want to pack up and get back there, especially these days (you know the story).
Back in the Himalayas I had the chance to sample some reserved, special invoices here and there but I'd guess when it comes to chinese teas the difference between the very best leaves and what ends up in the usual channels is even larger, maybe dramatically so in some cases.
Regarding the recent craze about BingDao I have a soft spot for teas from that area and I'm happy to sit on a couple kg of BingDao material; maybe not the best of the best but close and pretty darn tasty anyway :)

(Happily sipping some 2015 YS Bang Dong right now)

User avatar
Apr 15th, '17, 17:04
Posts: 251
Joined: Feb 9th, '16
Location: California

Re: Official Pu of the day

by stevorama » Apr 15th, '17, 17:04

Great to hear stories from Yunnan. About to go there myself.

2006 CNNP 7581 shou puer (from TealifeHK) this morning. Working on my large pot fu - brewed 8g to 210ml zini teapot.

2012 YS Spring Xi Kong sheng this afternoon. Very pleasant and smooth feelings.

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 02:10
Posts: 4584
Joined: Apr 1st, '09
Location: Bangkok

Re: Official Pu of the day

by Tead Off » Apr 16th, '17, 02:10

William wrote:
Tead Off wrote: I just returned from Yunnan and drank a lot of tea with a lot of people that know puerh well. These are people with money who have all the connections to get some of the top teas. One guy had a 500g bag of gushu Shincha from Bing Dao. This was maocha, not yet pressed. The wholesale cost of the tea was 4000RMB=about $600 for 1kg. The leaves were absolutely beautiful, unbroken, and big. The taste was delicious.

What impressed me more was the gushu shincha from Menghai. Wow. Such a fruitiness and delight it was in my mouth. Very impressive tea. All the maocha I had there was better than I had ever gotten from any online seller, and for someone who does not like shincha, I was turned around by the quality. Most of these teas were beyond my budget but seeing what was available was eye opening. Unless we pay the price, there is little chance to drink on this level. But in Yunnan, you can find exceptional teas for less than what we pay online sellers, in most cases. Of course, not everyone can go there to buy.

It is rare that you can find unmixed gushu unless you are buying direct from the farmers and have a relationship with them. There is a lot of monkey business in the tea business. The Chinese have a lot of buyers taking the best of the best. Kyarazen's Wuyi articles are very informative about how the tea biz goes.

Another thing that I came face to face with in Kunming was how dry the climate really is. My nose bled for lack of humidity so when faced with buying Kunming stored cakes, dry storage is really dry storage so don't expect much aging to take place.

Also, to my surprise, most drinkers were using about 7g of tea per 100ml, and in the case of Bing Dao shincha, 10g!
TO, such a wonderful experience, I envy you so much! Thanks for sharing with us! :shock:
I totally agree with you, quality costs, always! Buying directly from Yunnan would be awesome, though connections in this case are essential, but us mere mortals need to rely on dealers :mrgreen: .. the Gushu material I bought here in Japan last year was quite delicious, probably not the peak of the productions, but still tasty and satisfying! Hope the same for this year's harvests.
AFAIK, those dealers buy directly from farmers, but knowing the truth isn't possible, so I need to rely exclusively on my nose and tongue .. and trust a-tiny-bit of course.
If I happen to buy more that what I originally planned (depends on price), will send you some!
Would love to try!

Because I am not a young man any longer, putting teas away for 20 years will probably not work in my case. :D What this means for me is to begin to drink those teas I have put away years ago, and to buy only older cakes that I can afford and enjoy. While I appreciated drinking the shincha in Yunnan, it is not something that I would be buying, just enjoying the moment and learning about current events. A younger person who is keenly interested in Puerh teas, should keep abreast of the new teas with an eye on the future and storage of cakes to be enjoyed in their prime. I was a latecomer to the game and missed more opportunities than I care to remember! Puerh is a vast subject and not easy to enter its gate. After all, it's a rich man's game now, but it is still possible to buy and enjoy teas at a more affordable level.

The good stuff will be more and more controlled and out of reach for those who cannot pony up the bread for it. I think it would be a smart idea to choose carefully and horde what one can afford. The Chinese have money and they like to spend it. The amount of Puerh one sees in Yunnan is staggering. Every street has at least one shop selling teas. You cannot escape it. The old saying of go where the money is definitely applies to China and its teas.

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 06:23
Posts: 1117
Joined: Jul 10th, '13
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Japan.

Re: Official Pu of the day

by William » Apr 16th, '17, 06:23

Tead Off wrote:
Would love to try!

Because I am not a young man any longer, putting teas away for 20 years will probably not work in my case. :D What this means for me is to begin to drink those teas I have put away years ago, and to buy only older cakes that I can afford and enjoy. While I appreciated drinking the shincha in Yunnan, it is not something that I would be buying, just enjoying the moment and learning about current events. A younger person who is keenly interested in Puerh teas, should keep abreast of the new teas with an eye on the future and storage of cakes to be enjoyed in their prime. I was a latecomer to the game and missed more opportunities than I care to remember! Puerh is a vast subject and not easy to enter its gate. After all, it's a rich man's game now, but it is still possible to buy and enjoy teas at a more affordable level.

The good stuff will be more and more controlled and out of reach for those who cannot pony up the bread for it. I think it would be a smart idea to choose carefully and horde what one can afford. The Chinese have money and they like to spend it. The amount of Puerh one sees in Yunnan is staggering. Every street has at least one shop selling teas. You cannot escape it. The old saying of go where the money is definitely applies to China and its teas.
This post should be framed! Such wise words!
I totally agree with you TO and understand your priorities; may this be a good reminder for future generations.
I think this reasoning somewhat apply also to factory 1 and older teapots: good ones are not cheap nowadays, but still available, and their price will probably increase in future because of the huge Chinese demand, which is growing every year more and more .. so it's better to smartly hoard now good teapots (and good teas!) before they're gone.

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 07:39
Posts: 4584
Joined: Apr 1st, '09
Location: Bangkok

Re: Official Pu of the day

by Tead Off » Apr 16th, '17, 07:39

William wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
Would love to try!

Because I am not a young man any longer, putting teas away for 20 years will probably not work in my case. :D What this means for me is to begin to drink those teas I have put away years ago, and to buy only older cakes that I can afford and enjoy. While I appreciated drinking the shincha in Yunnan, it is not something that I would be buying, just enjoying the moment and learning about current events. A younger person who is keenly interested in Puerh teas, should keep abreast of the new teas with an eye on the future and storage of cakes to be enjoyed in their prime. I was a latecomer to the game and missed more opportunities than I care to remember! Puerh is a vast subject and not easy to enter its gate. After all, it's a rich man's game now, but it is still possible to buy and enjoy teas at a more affordable level.

The good stuff will be more and more controlled and out of reach for those who cannot pony up the bread for it. I think it would be a smart idea to choose carefully and horde what one can afford. The Chinese have money and they like to spend it. The amount of Puerh one sees in Yunnan is staggering. Every street has at least one shop selling teas. You cannot escape it. The old saying of go where the money is definitely applies to China and its teas.
This post should be framed! Such wise words!
I totally agree with you TO and understand your priorities; may this be a good reminder for future generations.
I think this reasoning somewhat apply also to factory 1 and older teapots: good ones are not cheap nowadays, but still available, and their price will probably increase in future because of the huge Chinese demand, which is growing every year more and more .. so it's better to smartly hoard now good teapots (and good teas!) before they're gone.
Personally, I've never been a collector of teapots. I appreciate them, but really don't have the desire for them. Ultimately, it's the tea we drink that we really concentrate on. The rest is kind of an ego trip, in a sense. Oddly enough, I didn't see anyone in Yunnan using Yixing for Puerh or Hongcha. The gaiwan is king and there are locally made pots that were occasionally used by some people. Glass is also popular, but I'm sure there are those who do use Yixing, I think. :lol:

I'm sure what you say is true about the demand for Yixing and the eventual scarcity of Factory 1 pots. But there are zillions of them. For me, if I wanted to collect something truly valuable and scarcer than Yixing, and often more affordable, it would be Qing porcelain teapot. Many beauties out there, and all hand painted. This to me is really collectible, but this is said by an old antique dealer that was trained in museum quality Asian arts. Yixing is more or less 'cookie cutter' craft. This is not meant to be demeaning but realistic. It was one of the last things that became popular in the 20th century. No one wanted it except for the really early Ming/Qing examples. For me, I like using Yixing for tea and own several, but not collecting it. Too ordinary for my tastes. How many pair of Nikes should one own. They are tools, not art for me. Of course, opinions differ and that's what makes people, people. 8)

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 08:12
Posts: 1117
Joined: Jul 10th, '13
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Japan.

Re: Official Pu of the day

by William » Apr 16th, '17, 08:12

Tead Off wrote: For me, I like using Yixing for tea and own several, but not collecting it. Too ordinary for my tastes. How many pair of Nikes should one own. They are tools, not art for me. Of course, opinions differ and that's what makes people, people. 8)
I guess this means I value ordinary teapots then :lol:
Different people, different preferences .. otherwise the world would be so boring! 8)

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 09:47
Posts: 4584
Joined: Apr 1st, '09
Location: Bangkok

Re: Official Pu of the day

by Tead Off » Apr 16th, '17, 09:47

William wrote:
Tead Off wrote: For me, I like using Yixing for tea and own several, but not collecting it. Too ordinary for my tastes. How many pair of Nikes should one own. They are tools, not art for me. Of course, opinions differ and that's what makes people, people. 8)
I guess this means I value ordinary teapots then :lol:
Different people, different preferences .. otherwise the world would be so boring! 8)
I wasn't implying you should not be interested in whatever you take a fancy to. I was only talking about my view and I'm not signing up converts. :D

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 09:51
Posts: 1117
Joined: Jul 10th, '13
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Japan.

Re: Official Pu of the day

by William » Apr 16th, '17, 09:51

Tead Off wrote:
William wrote:
Tead Off wrote: For me, I like using Yixing for tea and own several, but not collecting it. Too ordinary for my tastes. How many pair of Nikes should one own. They are tools, not art for me. Of course, opinions differ and that's what makes people, people. 8)
I guess this means I value ordinary teapots then :lol:
Different people, different preferences .. otherwise the world would be so boring! 8)
I wasn't implying you should not be interested in whatever you take a fancy to. I was only talking about my view and I'm not signing up converts. :D
Yeah it was clear TO, absolutely!
Hearing different opinions and feelings is always so interesting :D

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 12:07
Posts: 1871
Joined: Mar 22nd, '08
Location: Shanghai

Re: Official Pu of the day

by chrl42 » Apr 16th, '17, 12:07

Tead Off wrote:
William wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
Would love to try!

Because I am not a young man any longer, putting teas away for 20 years will probably not work in my case. :D What this means for me is to begin to drink those teas I have put away years ago, and to buy only older cakes that I can afford and enjoy. While I appreciated drinking the shincha in Yunnan, it is not something that I would be buying, just enjoying the moment and learning about current events. A younger person who is keenly interested in Puerh teas, should keep abreast of the new teas with an eye on the future and storage of cakes to be enjoyed in their prime. I was a latecomer to the game and missed more opportunities than I care to remember! Puerh is a vast subject and not easy to enter its gate. After all, it's a rich man's game now, but it is still possible to buy and enjoy teas at a more affordable level.

The good stuff will be more and more controlled and out of reach for those who cannot pony up the bread for it. I think it would be a smart idea to choose carefully and horde what one can afford. The Chinese have money and they like to spend it. The amount of Puerh one sees in Yunnan is staggering. Every street has at least one shop selling teas. You cannot escape it. The old saying of go where the money is definitely applies to China and its teas.
This post should be framed! Such wise words!
I totally agree with you TO and understand your priorities; may this be a good reminder for future generations.
I think this reasoning somewhat apply also to factory 1 and older teapots: good ones are not cheap nowadays, but still available, and their price will probably increase in future because of the huge Chinese demand, which is growing every year more and more .. so it's better to smartly hoard now good teapots (and good teas!) before they're gone.
Personally, I've never been a collector of teapots. I appreciate them, but really don't have the desire for them. Ultimately, it's the tea we drink that we really concentrate on. The rest is kind of an ego trip, in a sense. Oddly enough, I didn't see anyone in Yunnan using Yixing for Puerh or Hongcha. The gaiwan is king and there are locally made pots that were occasionally used by some people. Glass is also popular, but I'm sure there are those who do use Yixing, I think. :lol:

I'm sure what you say is true about the demand for Yixing and the eventual scarcity of Factory 1 pots. But there are zillions of them. For me, if I wanted to collect something truly valuable and scarcer than Yixing, and often more affordable, it would be Qing porcelain teapot. Many beauties out there, and all hand painted. This to me is really collectible, but this is said by an old antique dealer that was trained in museum quality Asian arts. Yixing is more or less 'cookie cutter' craft. This is not meant to be demeaning but realistic. It was one of the last things that became popular in the 20th century. No one wanted it except for the really early Ming/Qing examples. For me, I like using Yixing for tea and own several, but not collecting it. Too ordinary for my tastes. How many pair of Nikes should one own. They are tools, not art for me. Of course, opinions differ and that's what makes people, people. 8)
Good point, the best example was Yixing had no 'tributary kiln (官窑..dunno how to translate)', which was specially designed for the emperor..Jingdezhen had it though. But Qianlong still had a vast intrest in Yixing teapot..so you can find many yixings in the forbidden city or other officials' houses in Beijng..just didn't overwhelm Jingdezhen that's it. 'Jingdezhen porcelain, Yixing clayware' was quite famous term during Qing dynasty..it seems as long as teapot goes...yixing still owned a crown.

It's true the Yunnanese don't use yixing to drink tea..heck those ethnics when did they were rich enough to order to buy one back then :mrgreen: Cantonese and Fukkinese loved Yixing bcos they had $$ thanks for the ocean that these areas were the only allowed to trade with West in Qing. Southern Chinese used yixing to brew laocha bcos this teapot is quite good at retaining heat..it seems Gaiwan is most popular among Gushu lovers..both among tea drinkers and tea shops.

User avatar
Apr 16th, '17, 12:38
Posts: 1117
Joined: Jul 10th, '13
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Japan.

Re: Official Pu of the day

by William » Apr 16th, '17, 12:38

chrl42 wrote:
Good point, the best example was Yixing had no 'tributary kiln (官窑..dunno how to translate)', which was specially designed for the emperor..Jingdezhen had it though. But Qianlong still had a vast intrest in Yixing teapot..so you can find many yixings in the forbidden city or other officials' houses in Beijng..just didn't overwhelm Jingdezhen that's it. 'Jingdezhen porcelain, Yixing clayware' was quite famous term during Qing dynasty..it seems as long as teapot goes...yixing still owned a crown.

It's true the Yunnanese don't use yixing to drink tea..heck those ethnics when did they were rich enough to order to buy one back then :mrgreen: Cantonese and Fukkinese loved Yixing bcos they had $$ thanks for the ocean that these areas were the only allowed to trade with West in Qing. Southern Chinese used yixing to brew laocha bcos this teapot is quite good at retaining heat..it seems Gaiwan is most popular among Gushu lovers..both among tea drinkers and tea shops.
Food for thoughts ..
Nice post Chrl, interesting insights as always! :D

User avatar
Apr 18th, '17, 17:53
Posts: 1117
Joined: Jul 10th, '13
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Japan.

Re: Official Pu of the day

by William » Apr 18th, '17, 17:53

Having some gentle wild DaXue Shan from last year's harvest, along with my breakfast.
I always feel flavors of pineapple/green apples/mango when drinking this tea .. unusual but lovely!

Have a nice day everyone!

User avatar
Apr 19th, '17, 05:49
Vendor Member
Posts: 2929
Joined: Aug 28th, '12
Location: Hong Kong
Contact: jayinhk

Re: Official Pu of the day

by jayinhk » Apr 19th, '17, 05:49

stevorama wrote: Great to hear stories from Yunnan. About to go there myself.

2006 CNNP 7581 shou puer (from TealifeHK) this morning. Working on my large pot fu - brewed 8g to 210ml zini teapot.

2012 YS Spring Xi Kong sheng this afternoon. Very pleasant and smooth feelings.
What did you think? That's one of the first shu pus created for the HK market, and stored the way shu pu here has been stored since the 70s (just a little dryer)! I like the sweetness and sweet flavors that comes from dry storage, but that's a classic recipe and always reliable.

User avatar
Apr 19th, '17, 10:57
Posts: 251
Joined: Feb 9th, '16
Location: California

Re: Official Pu of the day

by stevorama » Apr 19th, '17, 10:57

jayinhk wrote:
stevorama wrote: Great to hear stories from Yunnan. About to go there myself.

2006 CNNP 7581 shou puer (from TealifeHK) this morning. Working on my large pot fu - brewed 8g to 210ml zini teapot.

2012 YS Spring Xi Kong sheng this afternoon. Very pleasant and smooth feelings.
What did you think? That's one of the first shu pus created for the HK market, and stored the way shu pu here has been stored since the 70s (just a little dryer)! I like the sweetness and sweet flavors that comes from dry storage, but that's a classic recipe and always reliable.
Very pleasant and smooth. Obviously a bit drier storage compared to your others. I think a good version of this style. I tend to prefer a smaller leaf grade. Like your 2001 CNNP 7572. That's more humid stored I think too. Ginseng fragrance, yumm.

User avatar
Apr 20th, '17, 15:57
Vendor Member
Posts: 2929
Joined: Aug 28th, '12
Location: Hong Kong
Contact: jayinhk

Re: Official Pu of the day

by jayinhk » Apr 20th, '17, 15:57

stevorama wrote:
jayinhk wrote:
stevorama wrote: Great to hear stories from Yunnan. About to go there myself.

2006 CNNP 7581 shou puer (from TealifeHK) this morning. Working on my large pot fu - brewed 8g to 210ml zini teapot.

2012 YS Spring Xi Kong sheng this afternoon. Very pleasant and smooth feelings.
What did you think? That's one of the first shu pus created for the HK market, and stored the way shu pu here has been stored since the 70s (just a little dryer)! I like the sweetness and sweet flavors that comes from dry storage, but that's a classic recipe and always reliable.
Very pleasant and smooth. Obviously a bit drier storage compared to your others. I think a good version of this style. I tend to prefer a smaller leaf grade. Like your 2001 CNNP 7572. That's more humid stored I think too. Ginseng fragrance, yumm.
Glad you're enjoying it! I like 7572 a lot, especially South China dry storage. I have some 2007 on the site that is lovely, and the tongs of 2007 7572 I have next to me are developing lovely aromas since the heat and humidity are here early this year!

Just broke off the first sample of my dry storage 7572s to try. Smells quite good (raisin and cocoa) from the rinse and it's seen less than a year of HK dry storage. Brewing in a Fang Yuan Pai zisha lidded cup that was made for the HK market.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BTHsx5JlRkR ... e.hk&hl=en

Fueled by 7572, I just bought:

2012 Xiaguan FT XiaoTai 100g tuos, x 10 (1 kg)
2016 Xiaguan Nanzhao 454g cakes x 5 (2.27kg)
2016 Xiaguan Cang'Er 500g cakes x 5 (2.5kg)
2014 Xiaguan Cang'Er 250g tuos x 10 (2.5kg)
2013 Xiaguan Nanzhao 200g tuos x 10 (2kg)

Total weight: 10.27kg

That should get me through the weekend I think!

User avatar
Apr 22nd, '17, 00:23
Posts: 251
Joined: Feb 9th, '16
Location: California

Re: Official Pu of the day

by stevorama » Apr 22nd, '17, 00:23

jayinhk wrote:That should get me through the weekend I think!
Better get drinking, that's a lot of tea!!

Drank the 2013 Theasophie Mu Yu shou pu er this morning. Still my favorite younger shou pu er.

+ Post Reply