Huigan and Qi

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

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Aug 22nd 17 4:50 pm
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by TORamarn » Aug 22nd 17 4:50 pm

kyarazen wrote:
its just some of the "psychoactives" in tea. i crudely classify them as psychoactives but they are just substances that neurologically affect us. different people have different sensitivity and metabolism of these compounds, to some, they are more sensitive, and to some, less sensitive.
I also feel exactly the same.

teas with "qi" may probably contain higher levels neurostimulatory components than others "without", and we probably cannot say without, just that the levels are not stimulating enough for that individual :lol:
Since I started feeling or sensing the "qi", I can detect it in every tea I drink.

So far I found that the weakest qi are, surprisingly, those yanchas from THAT famous brand. :o I don't know why, but they were very weak - almost none.

This reminds me that I really have to try Lipton yellow teabag to see if I can feel any qi in it... :wink:

Aug 22nd 17 6:18 pm
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by theredbaron » Aug 22nd 17 6:18 pm

kyarazen wrote:
Bok wrote: But you’ll notice it no matter what if you drink tea with qi before going to bed – active dreams and restless sleep!
its just some of the "psychoactives" in tea. i crudely classify them as psychoactives but they are just substances that neurologically affect us. different people have different sensitivity and metabolism of these compounds, to some, they are more sensitive, and to some, less sensitive.

teas with "qi" may probably contain higher levels neurostimulatory components than others "without", and we probably cannot say without, just that the levels are not stimulating enough for that individual :lol:

One should however not mistake "Qi" with being teadrunk, meaning a simple overdose of caffeine - which can easily happen, and which i find not very nice.
But in the end, i guess everything comes down to natural science, even if we cannot (yet, or at times) measure certain effects.

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Aug 23rd 17 2:49 am
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by tingjunkie » Aug 23rd 17 2:49 am

theredbaron wrote: One should however not mistake "Qi" with being teadrunk, meaning a simple overdose of caffeine
Qi is subjective, but I've never heard teadrunk being defined as anything to do with caffeine.

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Aug 23rd 17 4:15 am
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by kyarazen » Aug 23rd 17 4:15 am

TORamarn wrote: Since I started feeling or sensing the "qi", I can detect it in every tea I drink.

So far I found that the weakest qi are, surprisingly, those yanchas from THAT famous brand. :o I don't know why, but they were very weak - almost none.

This reminds me that I really have to try Lipton yellow teabag to see if I can feel any qi in it... :wink:
it depends on the tea's cultivation condition, processing and roasting.

i've noticed two spectrums in tea "qi" perceptions, although i'm not ready to publish a dissertation on "Qi" despite having approached it from all possible aspects from martial arts, to food, to incense, to psycho actives, to objects, to ghost and spirits (if they really exist).

but just to simply matters, there are some teas that obviously create a sense of "presence" that you can feel it "arising", and subsequently "moving it", the origins can be most easily felt upwards from the gastrointestinal regions, almost like a dantian qi rising feel. the other is an upward accumulation to the higher head regions.

however there are also some teas that instead of "arising", they descend, and "fade away". t his is also a type of "qi", and is one of the types that i'm personally quite interested in. one classical examples is the tea made by the taoist priest at horse head cliff's taoist temple. it gives a 意念化无 feeling, and the taoist priest also mention that tea, is not a beverage, it is an antidote to "poison".

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Aug 23rd 17 5:48 pm
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by TORamarn » Aug 23rd 17 5:48 pm

kyarazen wrote: however there are also some teas that instead of "arising", they descend, and "fade away". t his is also a type of "qi", and is one of the types that i'm personally quite interested in. one classical examples is the tea made by the taoist priest at horse head cliff's taoist temple. it gives a 意念化无 feeling, and the taoist priest also mention that tea, is not a beverage, it is an antidote to "poison".
That's very interesting. I've had teas that stay low (comparatively), or teas that move down the legs. But I can't recall any tea that has qi moving down and fades or dissipates out of my body.

Aug 23rd 17 7:34 pm
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Re: Huigan and Qi

by fdrx » Aug 23rd 17 7:34 pm

I might be wrong, but this description makes me think of a classA bingdao i have been able to try in the past: after 7 hours, once the effects started to fade, i suddenly realized how severly "affected" i was during all this time .
This, and a quick and narcotic yibang i have, and of course some strong bulangs & yiwus (no necessary to describe), are the most agressive effects i have personally experienced with young shengs. Definitely not for every day...