Pu-erh tea, does it contain oxalate?

One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

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Re:

by kyarazen » Jul 23rd 14 1:49 am

bonescwa wrote:Hmm you're right. I hate renal physiology lol. But tea catechin or polyphenols being some kind of chelator for calcium is one thing, antioxidants somehow helping renal tubular cells to dissolve calcium oxalate crystals is another.

tea catechins/polyphenols are antioxidants themselves..

in kidney stone treatment there are a myriad of practices with varying efficacies with different people. one is direct EDTA infusion into the ureter. the other is EDTA in the oral administration form. both are not 100% working methods but there are people that report curative properties. the mechanism is just to chelate calcium..

tea polyphenols should be able to do the same, but it will be a competing reaction, considering tea contains both polyphenols and oxalate (which contributes to stone formation), and the ratiometric content could be suggestive why green tea is always more recommended, and black tea is prohibited (more oxidized) .

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by bonescwa » Jul 23rd 14 4:42 am

But in real life, I've never seen anyone prescribe that. You just give them pain meds and make sure they're not too big to pass, in which case you need to get urology involved. But other than that, I think direct infusion of edta into the ureter is far too invasive to be a practical clinical treatment. This turned into me venting about the current atmosphere of academia.

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Re:

by entropyembrace » Jul 23rd 14 5:25 am

bonescwa wrote:But in real life, I've never seen anyone prescribe that. You just give them pain meds and make sure they're not too big to pass, in which case you need to get urology involved. But other than that, I think direct infusion of edta into the ureter is far too invasive to be a practical clinical treatment. This turned into me venting about the current atmosphere of academia.
That's the immediate treatment when you already have kidney stones, yes. But if you get kidney stones it's highly likely that you will get them again in a few years if you don't make dietary changes. That's when the Dr's give you a list of foods and drinks you should and should not have.

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Re: Pu-erh tea, does it contain oxalate?

by LoveChai » Oct 5th 21 9:42 pm

Rui wrote: The urologist has warned me not to drink a lot of black tea as it contains oxalate which helps forming the type of kidney stones I seem to get every few years. He also said that white, yellow and green teas are fine for me to consume.

Although I no longer drink much black tea usually my favourite tea is Pu-Erh in both raw and cooked forms.

Does anyone know if Pu-Erh tea also has high levels of oxalate? Any information on this would be great.

Many thanks.

Rui
The oxalate intake from daily consumption of black teas is modest when compared to the amounts of soluble oxalate that can be found in common foods. Also, oxylates bind to calcium so if you have milk in your tea the oxylate level is reduced.

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Re: Pu-erh tea, does it contain oxalate?

by parang » Oct 24th 21 9:34 pm

I am sensitive to oxalate, eg when I eat sorrels, I can feel the pain in my joints later that day or the next. But I drink large amounts of pu-erh without any ill effects (often full cream milk and butter). I assume most oxalate present in fresh tea or mao cha is transformed into something else by the end of natural ripening and/or composting process, or it is really thanks to the dairy, or both, I don't know.

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Re: Pu-erh tea, does it contain oxalate?

by Teasenz » Oct 28th 21 8:09 am

The tea plant contains a natural amount of oxalate. So this means that any kind of tea (green, white, oolong, pu erh etc) will contain this. We're talking about a few mg per 1kg of tea. I don't know how much of those milligrams end up in a brewed cup of tea.

Assuming you use 3 gram of tea per session. We are talking about 15mg of oxalate.
Compare this to 1000mg of oxalate in 100g portion of spinach, and it's kinda nothing.

Of course, I would still advice to reduce tea intake if you've issues with kidney stones.

source:
https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/1249526 ... %2Fg%20tea.
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