Chinese Restaurant Tea

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Aug 7th 20 8:31 pm
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Chinese Restaurant Tea

by lavendershampoo » Aug 7th 20 8:31 pm

When I was growing up, I’m 53 now as a reference, I loved the tea at Chinese restaurants! I remember is was loose and I’ve been told it was Oolong but the Oolong’s I’ve tried are too mild or smoky (not a fan). The closest thing I could find was Bigelow bagged tea. Any recs for similar in loose?

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Aug 13th 20 3:48 pm
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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by sneakers » Aug 13th 20 3:48 pm

There are many oolongs, along the spectrum from black to green, and each one tastes different. I've had a highly-prized oolong that tasted like mud that I wouldn't buy again. Chinese restaurants us a generic, cheap oolong. I've found a similar taste in Black Dragon Formosa Oolong from SilverTips Tea.

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by bagua7 » Aug 27th 20 6:50 am

It's what the Cantonese call Bolay tea. Usually cheap maocha (puerh pre-processing phase). Not certainly oolong is what you get in a Chinese restaurant!

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Aug 27th 20 7:06 am
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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by sneakers » Aug 27th 20 7:06 am

bagua7 wrote: It's what the Cantonese call Bolay tea. Usually cheap maocha (puerh pre-processing phase). Not certainly oolong is what you get in a Chinese restaurant!
Probably right. I'm not familiar with the taste of maocha.

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by Bridgette » Aug 27th 20 2:27 pm

lavendershampoo wrote: When I was growing up, I’m 53 now as a reference, I loved the tea at Chinese restaurants! I remember is was loose and I’ve been told it was Oolong but the Oolong’s I’ve tried are too mild or smoky (not a fan). The closest thing I could find was Bigelow bagged tea. Any recs for similar in loose?
Hey there, you might enjoy this oolong that we recommend as a Chinese Restaurant tea.
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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by LeoFox » Aug 28th 20 2:16 am

lavendershampoo wrote: When I was growing up, I’m 53 now as a reference, I loved the tea at Chinese restaurants! I remember is was loose and I’ve been told it was Oolong but the Oolong’s I’ve tried are too mild or smoky (not a fan). The closest thing I could find was Bigelow bagged tea. Any recs for similar in loose?
A common chinese restaurant tea is cheap ripe pu-erh mixed with chrysanthemums. Here is a description:

https://www.teasenz.com/chinese-tea/chr ... ecipe.html

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by Lyuluck » Aug 31st 20 2:58 am

Oolong tea is good for the stomach, especially after you are over 50

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by 12Tea » Sep 3rd 20 3:01 pm

Bridgette wrote: Hey there, you might enjoy this oolong that we recommend as a Chinese Restaurant tea.
I actually have some of this at home :) It's pretty good. The flavour is somewhere between a dark oolong and an aged white tea.

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by 12Tea » Sep 3rd 20 3:02 pm

bagua7 wrote: It's what the Cantonese call Bolay tea. Usually cheap maocha (puerh pre-processing phase). Not certainly oolong is what you get in a Chinese restaurant!
Actually Tie Guan Yin is a very common Chinese restaurant tea here in Europe. The other ones are:
  • ripe puerh (bolay)
  • chrysanthemum tea
  • chrysanthemum + ripe pu erh blend

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by bagua7 » Sep 24th 20 5:09 am

The thing is that the OP hasn't mentioned his location. This is problematic. In Australia, where I live, cheap bolay. You dine in Taipei and it's a totally different game:

http://taipeiexpat.com/cha-for-tea/

;)

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by SmallSmallTea » Sep 25th 20 6:31 am

When i was younger, often hear Luk Pou, Pou Lei, Kuk Pou being ordered. Oh! Not to forget Heong Pin and Tork Shou Heong which is rather famous too.

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Re: Chinese Restaurant Tea

by sneakers » Sep 25th 20 6:08 pm

SmallSmallTea wrote: When i was younger, often hear Luk Pou, Pou Lei, Kuk Pou being ordered. Oh! Not to forget Heong Pin and Tork Shou Heong which is rather famous too.
You live somewhere where you get choices :D The tea served in every Chinese restaurant I've been in here (NYC area) is just called "tea," so we don't know exactly what we're getting. I think the OP has plenty of ideas to test out now.