Can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

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Jun 10th, '12, 20:13
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Can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by novel » Jun 10th, '12, 20:13

]hi im an absolute noob to the world of drinking tea.
i got some tie guan yin in china from family.

can someone provide me information about the specific brand of tea i have? all i can tell from the packaging is its from anxi.

i uploaded an image of the front and back of the box.
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Jun 10th, '12, 23:21
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by gingkoseto » Jun 10th, '12, 23:21

The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.

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Jun 10th, '12, 23:58
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by Poohblah » Jun 10th, '12, 23:58

gingkoseto wrote:The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.
So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?

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Jun 11th, '12, 05:41
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by TwoDog2 » Jun 11th, '12, 05:41

Poohblah wrote: So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?
A little poking around on baidu didn't really reveal a brand under that name. I am guessing it is just generic packaging from a retailer/wholesaler who bagged/boxed a large batch themselves

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Jun 11th, '12, 12:02
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by gingkoseto » Jun 11th, '12, 12:02

Poohblah wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.
So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?
That can be roughly translated into classical collection, usually used on antiques or books, but has been more and more adopted as one of the flowery words for tea, especially puerh. :mrgreen:

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Jun 11th, '12, 12:57
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by Poohblah » Jun 11th, '12, 12:57

gingkoseto wrote:
Poohblah wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.
So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?
That can be roughly translated into classical collection, usually used on antiques or books, but has been more and more adopted as one of the flowery words for tea, especially puerh. :mrgreen:
Ah. That makes sense, thank you! :D I was a little bit confused at first, I was thinking 典 as in 詞典 and 藏 as in 躲藏, which doesn't make too much sense.

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Jun 14th, '12, 04:50
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by TwoDog2 » Jun 14th, '12, 04:50

gingkoseto wrote: That can be roughly translated into classical collection, usually used on antiques or books

That definitely adds to the generic aspect of the packaging - I will watch for that next time I see a packaging retailer at a market

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Jun 17th, '12, 08:39
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by MarshalN » Jun 17th, '12, 08:39

You can pretty much ignore all packaging for TGY - 99% of the time it's generic and means nothing.

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Jun 18th, '12, 00:20
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by TwoDog2 » Jun 18th, '12, 00:20

MarshalN wrote:You can pretty much ignore all packaging for TGY - 99% of the time it's generic and means nothing.
TGY and most Chinese tea. Packaging/labels have lost all meaning.

My favorite disparity are the reds people label as jin jun mei... pretty much any fujian red gets tossed in that category these days.

Jun 26th, '12, 00:14
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Re: Can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by cfcoo » Jun 26th, '12, 00:14

包装上应该有厂家。至于日期是建厂日期。

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Jun 26th, '12, 00:45
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Re: Can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by TwoDog2 » Jun 26th, '12, 00:45

cfcoo wrote:包装上应该有厂家。至于日期是建厂日期。
translation: The packaging should have a factory name and production date.

Really? You are Chinese, you should know better than that. Packages like this are totally meaningless. Stuffing TGY into intentionally misleading packages is a national past time.

Jul 10th, '12, 15:34
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by iovetea » Jul 10th, '12, 15:34

Poohblah wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.
So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?
i think the last days i read somewhere on yahoo than dian in dian hong means tea from yunan.

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Jul 10th, '12, 23:40
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Re: can someone identify this tie guan yin for me?

by Poohblah » Jul 10th, '12, 23:40

iovetea wrote:
Poohblah wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:The box doesn't seem to have any brand information on it. It seems a generic gift box for Tie Guan Yin.
So then what does the 典蔵 diǎn cáng in the bottom picture mean?
i think the last days i read somewhere on yahoo than dian in dian hong means tea from yunan.
You're right that "dian hong" does refer to Yunnanese black teas. However, that phrase is 滇紅 diān hóng, meaning "Yunnan red [tea]", not 典紅 diǎn hóng, which might mean something like "scholarly/canonical red", if it were an actual phrase.

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